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Posted August 24, 2019, by Geoff Hubbs (geoffrey [dot] hubbs [at] att [dot] net)

See Governor Mario M. Cuomo Bridge listing for pictures, etc.

Posted August 23, 2019, by Luke
Posted August 23, 2019, by Geoff Hubbs (geoffrey [dot] hubbs [at] att [dot] net)

I am 99% certain the truss portion dates to 1906 like the other ones (Lafayette Ave,etc) in the area over Amtrak

Posted August 18, 2019, by Luke
Ben's Bridge (New York)
Posted August 9, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

Thanks for Sharing!

Ben's Bridge (New York)
Posted August 9, 2019, by Geoff Hubbs (geoffrey [dot] hubbs [at] att [dot] net)

Pentax, probably an ME. Trains were my focus but I also liked bridges a props.

Ben's Bridge (New York)
Posted August 9, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

Geoff, what camera in 1975? NICE shot

Posted August 2, 2019, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The area seems too flat for this to have been a bore tunnel. Source?

Posted July 16, 2019, by Anonymous

This was a good resource, but the first 2 photos are f the Saunders Street Bridge, located a little further north in the Village.

Posted July 11, 2019, by Dave Frieder (drfrieder [at] aol [dot] com)

Leon Moisseiff was a consulting engineer for the Triborough bridge but the engineer of design was Allston Dana.

Posted July 3, 2019, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The 1953 quad shows this as a spur coming off the yard to the NW. It cuts across two lines, this one and another 100 yards to the NE. Same railroad.

Posted June 29, 2019, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

This may provide access to the navigation light on the point.

Posted June 25, 2019, by Anonymous

this bridge saved by demolition by the County in 2006-2007 by the residents of Toddsville and interested persons. Money was donated, the wooden boards wee replaced, barriers put there so only available as a walking,- wheelchair accessible- bridge. Can fish off it. Accessible from a turn off Greenough Road.

Posted June 24, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

Just a culvert, but about as good as it gets when off the street view NBI grid!

Posted June 8, 2019, by Joel Wyman (ponchoman49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge no longer exists as of 2019. Not sure why it was removed with little other than some rotted planks.

Posted June 7, 2019, by Geoff Hubbs (geoffrey [dot] hubbs [at] att [dot] net)

Watkins Glen State Park and Rainbow Bridge shown in photos are no where near here, but in Schuyler County

Posted June 4, 2019, by Tom Koller (Tk48states [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Found this stone tunnel today and was surprised at its height, can easily accommodate double stacks although I doubt any ever travel there.

Posted June 2, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

Predecessor Bridge?

Posted June 1, 2019, by Anonymous

=

Posted June 1, 2019, by Anonymous

*

Posted June 1, 2019, by Anonymous

*

Posted May 25, 2019, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Could be,Don.

Posted May 25, 2019, by Don

Sign next to the H&R Block bldg says Gowanda Veteran's Memorial Bridge.

Street view says September 2018. So, Labor Day?

Posted May 24, 2019, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Nice picture of the army tank.

Posted May 24, 2019, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks,Dana and Kay.Sounds logical to me.

Posted May 24, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

Posted a second Street View From Legion Drive, dated 2007. Would guess the Legion maintains flags. Nice touch.

Posted May 24, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

Street View from September 2018. Not sure of any reason other than patriotism. Good eye George.

Posted May 24, 2019, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I noticed flags on the bridge.Any significance with the flags on the bridge?

Posted May 9, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

You would have to see if county road records still exist for 1912 to get exact dates. I'm guessing it was completed in a few months.

Posted May 9, 2019, by Steven Griffith (Sgriffith_5555 [at] yahoo [dot] com )

When did they start building this bridge and how long did it take to complete is? Gaines Basin Truss Bridge.

Posted May 7, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

Community Really Embraced this Bridge

Posted May 7, 2019, by Joel Wyman (jwyman2242 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge has been closed for about 4 or more years with over grown grass on both approaches. It is to be replaced sometime this year but I was really hoping they would instead rehabilitate this one as these historical trusses are getting rarer by the year, especially one that is over 110 years old. The bridge itself looks in good shape other than peeling paint but the cement supports are getting rough. A re-hab like they did on Delta Dam would be easy enough.

Posted April 30, 2019, by Jim Courtright (jimcourt1 [at] verizon [dot] net)

This rolling lift bridge started out life with the CH&N railroad circa 1910. It's one of TWO bridges on the trestle going from Placida to Gasparilla Island - BOCA GRANDE. It was dismantled in 1988 and taken by barge to the current location in NY. The base and control tower are still intact; it's used as a fishing pier. The original location is approx: N26°49.714' W82°15.999'

There was a second bridge on this trestle, a swing bridge which has been dismantled. The base is still there, as is most of the trestle across the span. Its approx location is N26°48.965' W82°16.318'

The rail span was used to bring phosphate from "bone valley" to ships at a pier in Boca Grande. Later an oil shipment facility used the pier and trestle.

BRIDGEHUNTER documents a current bridge on the Boca Grande causeway. This is a bridge for vehicular traffic, and runs parallel to the old railroad trestle.

Posted April 29, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

Prep for replacement. 2 years

Posted April 9, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

Happened South by here on RT 63. New Bridge being built about 150 yards South. Hope its a by pass and not a replacement. Couldn't stop construction and traffic unsafe.

Posted April 8, 2019, by Anonymous

This isn't the Bayonne Bridge, though...

Posted April 7, 2019, by Nathan Delaplaine (ndelaplaine [at] gmail [dot] com)

Robert I can agree with what you just said. I’ll just ignore the trolls. Nowadays, I have decided to change my ways.

Posted March 24, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

modern non historic...…..

Posted March 21, 2019, by Brendan Delay (brendandelay [at] ameritech [dot] net)

Did Gordon Creek at one time run through both arches of this bridge?

It now runs through the northern arch in its channel. Did it ever run through

the southern arch? Maybe it was designed with two arches for additional

drainage in the event of flooding from the somewhat hilly terrain around it which

would have had more farm fields then rather than houses, apartment buildings and schools and wooded areas as now.

Was the creek later re-channeled to bring it through only one arch?

Posted March 20, 2019, by MFT (matsutwo [at] gmail [dot] com)

I lived right around the corner from there on Rock City Road for a few months back in 2006. Wish I was into bridges then, I could drove over and taken some photos with my now antiquated digital camera.

Posted March 19, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

Kahn Arch. Any others anyone knows of?

Posted March 19, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Sounds like he was an exceptional man!

Posted March 19, 2019, by Brendan Edward Delay (brendandelay [at] ameritech [dot] net)

Edward Delay kept track of and visited his grandfather's stone bridges.

He himself was trained as a dry wall stone mason and a cement block mason earlier in life.

Obituary Condolences

Edward Delay Obituary

Edward Vincent Delay SARATOGA SPRINGS - Edward Vincent Delay passed away on October 1, 2014. He was born in this city Feb. 28, 1932 to his father of the same name and Mary Donohue Delay, a legal stenographer who once worked for Senator Brackett, then for his nephew’s law firm, Brackett, Eddy and Dorsey. His grandfather, Patrick J. Delay of County Cork stock, in 1907 constructed the masterpiece Stone Arch Bridge over Geyser Brook for the Hudson Valley Railway as master mason for the Delaware & Hudson Railway; but 11 years later sacrificed his life to save his men from being crushed by the negligent movement of a steam locomotive on McArty Avenue viaduct in Albany. Patrick’s son, Edward V. Delay, at the time was the Ass’t Director of the War Trade Intelligence Bureau in Washington, D.C., later enlisting as a private, later promoted to Lieutenant, serving in the New York National Guard until 1925; returning to Saratoga as proprietor of the E.V. Delay Mfg. Co., which carried his family in prosperity through the depression and WWII. Residents may recall the 1948 Cadillac given to him on his 16th Birthday by his father. Edward married one of his Schenectady meter reading customers, Annie Gallagher, an honors nursing graduate of Leicester University, Certified Midwife and native of Belfast, N.I. Ten children followed, Timothy, Brendan, the late Neal, Mary, Frances, Erin, Moira, Kieran, Owen and Dermuid. Edward furthered the building skills of his Delay and Gaffney ancestors, building 42 homes in Syracuse, also initiating the volunteer effort to repaint the interior of the large Most Holy Rosary School. Sympathetic to the Spa City’s long decline, when working for the Anheuser Busch Corporation, he convinced it in the early 1980’s to purchase beer cans for its Baldwinsville brewery from the Ball Corporation plant in the Grande Industrial Park, and then even to mail its shipping invoices from the Saratoga Post Office, rather than Baldwinsville. On trips, he even took his personal mail from Syracuse to Saratoga to mail at the Broadway Post Office, buying stamps there. With resourceful imagination, in the early 1980’s he saved the dormant Spring Water Bottling Plant from liquidation, persuading Anheuser Busch to buy it for water as a beverage. He saved many jobs.

Posted March 19, 2019, by Brendan Edward Delay (brendandelay [at] ameritech [dot] net)

I wonder if the rail traffic and loads are lower than the 1950's when it was built?

Could it be the D & H markings are there because it is original paint, now 64 years old? Or maybe some paint patching was done in the interim. The bridge girders over Interstate 90 are suspended with high clearance for truck trailers, which means no accidents due to insufficient clearance or high trucks.

Posted March 19, 2019, by Brendan Delay (brendandelay [at] ameritech [dot] net)

When I visited this bridge in the late summer of 1992, it had a strong guardrail to protect railroad workers walking or doing maintenance. However, I did notice the rust on the metal components which were over the Genesee River, which would get humidity.

It was an amazing sight to look upward to view a locomotive pulling cars on that bridge, hundreds of feet suspended over the river.

The bridge lasted a very long time when we considered the dynamic loads over it.

Posted March 13, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein
Posted March 11, 2019, by Luke

Fourth

Posted March 11, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

3 of 4

Posted March 11, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

2 of 4

Posted March 11, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

1 of 4

Posted March 10, 2019, by justsayin

Circle E dinner in Hanncock GREAT place to eat if in area

Posted March 10, 2019, by Chris Bigham (thebigham69 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Look here at Google Maps:

https://goo.gl/maps/HHiqyTURAeB2

Posted March 10, 2019, by Chris Bigham (thebigham69 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

When the Rt. 17 expressway was built through the Hawk Mountain, the tunnel entrances were covered with rock.

Supposedly, baby rattlesnakes populate the hill in the Spring where the southern entrance of the tunnel was located.

Posted March 10, 2019, by Chris Bigham (thebigham69 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Supposedly a local boy scout or girl scout troop gives tours of the tunnel. The tunnel lining is in excellent shape and is easy to walk through.

This tunnel was built to bypass 3 switchbacks. When the tunnel opened, the switchbacks were abandoned. A few traces of the switchback grade remains today.

Posted March 10, 2019, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Geoff,the first 2 pictures are of the ST-Hudson River Bridge,not the railroad the bridge was listed under.Out of curiosity I looked the bridge up along with the pictures and found it.

Posted March 10, 2019, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Geoff,the first 2 pictures are of the ST-Hudson River Bridge,not the railroad the bridge was listed under.Out of curiosity I looked the bridge up along with the pictures and found it.

Posted March 10, 2019, by Geoff Hubbs (geoffrey [dot] hubbs [at] att [dot] net)

The first 2 photos are of the existing B&M-ST bridge outside of Mechanicville NY

Posted March 9, 2019, by Dave Frieder (drfrieder [at] aol [dot] com)

The Bayonne bridge opened on November 15th 1931. NOT 1932.

Posted March 8, 2019, by Bob Naske (naskebob [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge is still in use . It still has the identification sign facing I90 traffic that says "D&H RR". Amazing!!

Posted March 7, 2019, by Jeff Wieland (jjwieland [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nice shots of the Alco PA's.

Posted March 1, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

Thanks Daniel!

Posted March 1, 2019, by Daniel
Posted February 28, 2019, by Dana

Sat view shows a mystery bridge just upstream in Ellicott creek?

Posted February 28, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein
Posted February 28, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

Truck eater, AGAIN!

Posted February 25, 2019, by Brendan Delay (brendanedwarddelay [at] gmail [dot] com)

The south pier stones just under the ties have the mason's marks of Patrick J. Delay, my great-grandfather, who was a stone mason for the Delaware & Hudson Railway. He finished his career as the Boss Stone Mason. My father found the mason's marks in the early 1970's and I located them in 2015 and 2016. Here is an article about his construction of an arch interurban railroad bridge in Saratoga County in 1907.

THE DAILY SARATOGIAN, THURSDAY, MAY 23, 1907

HAVE SHIFTED GEYSERS

BROOK TO ANOTHER BED

-------------------------------------

Difficult task for Workman at

Formel Property

-------------------------------------

BUILDING TROLLEY CULVERT

-------------------------------------

Work Preparatory to Connecting Tracks on New Saratoga-Schenectady

Line-Many Visitors

The preparatory work for connecting the trolley tracks of the Delaware & Hudson on the Formel property, south of the village is going on rapidly. The building of an addition to the culvert over the Geyser’s Brook was the most difficult part of the undertaking. That part of the work is in charge of Patrick Delay, master mason for the Delaware & Hudson, and the foundation work is about completed. Soon the arch will spring into shape, when the filling into a level with the present tracks will be comparatively easy.

Many visitors have been attracted to the spot since the work started, and most of them wondered how Mr. Delay would get that swift running stream out of his way while building the culvert. A solid foundation for the south side of the culvert was secured by blasting into a ledge of slate rock which rises abruptly on that side of the stream. To secure an equally good foundation on the north side necessitated forcing the brook out of its natural channel and running it into a new one. This was accomplished by a sluiceway, built of stout plank and boards, about eight feed wide, three feet deep and a hundred feet long.

One end of the sluiceway was run a short distance into the eastern end of the old culvert, the water forced into it, this artificial channel, carrying the stream completely out of the workmen’s way, and discharging it about a hundred feet further down stream.

Recent rains have largely increased the volume of water, which rushed down the new wooden bed with an angry roar, as if resenting the liberties which Mr. Delay had taken with it, forming a foaming cataract, as it tumbled into its old channel and hurries on to join the Kayderossaras, about half a mile distant.

Posted February 25, 2019, by Brendan Delay (brendanedwarddelay [at] gmail [dot] com)

THE DAILY SARATOGIAN, THURSDAY, MAY 23, 1907

HAVE SHIFTED GEYSERS

BROOK TO ANOTHER BED

-------------------------------------

Difficult task for Workman at

Formel Property

-------------------------------------

BUILDING TROLLEY CULVERT

-------------------------------------

Work Preparatory to Connecting Tracks on New Saratoga-Schenectady

Line-Many Visitors

The preparatory work for connecting the trolley tracks of the Delaware & Hudson on the Formel property, south of the village is going on rapidly. The building of an addition to the culvert over the Geyser’s Brook was the most difficult part of the undertaking. That part of the work is in charge of Patrick Delay, master mason for the Delaware & Hudson, and the foundation work is about completed. Soon the arch will spring into shape, when the filling into a level with the present tracks will be comparatively easy.

Many visitors have been attracted to the spot since the work started, and most of them wondered how Mr. Delay would get that swift running stream out of his way while building the culvert. A solid foundation for the south side of the culvert was secured by blasting into a ledge of slate rock which rises abruptly on that side of the stream. To secure an equally good foundation on the north side necessitated forcing the brook out of its natural channel and running it into a new one. This was accomplished by a sluiceway, built of stout plank and boards, about eight feed wide, three feet deep and a hundred feet long.

One end of the sluiceway was run a short distance into the eastern end of the old culvert, the water forced into it, this artificial channel, carrying the stream completely out of the workmen’s way, and discharging it about a hundred feet further down stream.

Recent rains have largely increased the volume of water, which rushed down the new wooden bed with an angry roar, as if resenting the liberties which Mr. Delay had taken with it, forming a foaming cataract, as it tumbled into its old channel and hurries on to join the Kayderossaras, about half a mile distant.

Posted February 25, 2019, by Brendan Delay (brendanedwarddelay [at] ameritech [dot] net)

THE DAILY SARATOGIAN, THURSDAY, MAY 23, 1907

HAVE SHIFTED GEYSERS

BROOK TO ANOTHER BED

-------------------------------------

Difficult task for Workman at

Formel Property

-------------------------------------

BUILDING TROLLEY CULVERT

-------------------------------------

Work Preparatory to Connecting Tracks on New Saratoga-Schenectady

Line-Many Visitors

The preparatory work for connecting the trolley tracks of the Delaware & Hudson on the Formel property, south of the village is going on rapidly. The building of an addition to the culvert over the Geyser’s Brook was the most difficult part of the undertaking. That part of the work is in charge of Patrick Delay, master mason for the Delaware & Hudson, and the foundation work is about completed. Soon the arch will spring into shape, when the filling into a level with the present tracks will be comparatively easy.

Many visitors have been attracted to the spot since the work started, and most of them wondered how Mr. Delay would get that swift running stream out of his way while building the culvert. A solid foundation for the south side of the culvert was secured by blasting into a ledge of slate rock which rises abruptly on that side of the stream. To secure an equally good foundation on the north side necessitated forcing the brook out of its natural channel and running it into a new one. This was accomplished by a sluiceway, built of stout plank and boards, about eight feed wide, three feet deep and a hundred feet long.

One end of the sluiceway was run a short distance into the eastern end of the old culvert, the water forced into it, this artificial channel, carrying the stream completely out of the workmen’s way, and discharging it about a hundred feet further down stream.

Recent rains have largely increased the volume of water, which rushed down the new wooden bed with an angry roar, as if resenting the liberties which Mr. Delay had taken with it, forming a foaming cataract, as it tumbled into its old channel and hurries on to join the Kayderossaras, about half a mile distant.

Posted February 25, 2019, by Brendan Delay (brendanedwarddelay [at] gmail [dot] com)

When was the stone bridge laid down? At the same time as the abutment on the south side of the road, maybe? I wanted to look at it for mason's marks last August but the Kiwanis was hosting a concert in the adjacent park serving snacks and popcorn. I did buy some popcorn and drank some water from the Big Red Spring.

I wonder if the workmen on the bridge project drank some water from the spring?

Posted February 25, 2019, by Brendan Delay (brendanedwarddelay [at] gmail [dot] com)

THE DAILY SARATOGIAN, THURSDAY, MAY 23, 1907

HAVE SHIFTED GEYSERS

BROOK TO ANOTHER BED

-------------------------------------

Difficult task for Workman at

Formel Property

-------------------------------------

BUILDING TROLLEY CULVERT

-------------------------------------

Work Preparatory to Connecting Tracks on New Saratoga-Schenectady

Line-Many Visitors

The preparatory work for connecting the trolley tracks of the Delaware & Hudson on the Formel property, south of the village is going on rapidly. The building of an addition to the culvert over the Geyser’s Brook was the most difficult part of the undertaking. That part of the work is in charge of Patrick Delay, master mason for the Delaware & Hudson, and the foundation work is about completed. Soon the arch will spring into shape, when the filling into a level with the present tracks will be comparatively easy.

Many visitors have been attracted to the spot since the work started, and most of them wondered how Mr. Delay would get that swift running stream out of his way while building the culvert. A solid foundation for the south side of the culvert was secured by blasting into a ledge of slate rock which rises abruptly on that side of the stream. To secure an equally good foundation on the north side necessitated forcing the brook out of its natural channel and running it into a new one. This was accomplished by a sluiceway, built of stout plank and boards, about eight feed wide, three feet deep and a hundred feet long.

One end of the sluiceway was run a short distance into the eastern end of the old culvert, the water forced into it, this artificial channel, carrying the stream completely out of the workmen’s way, and discharging it about a hundred feet further down stream.

Recent rains have largely increased the volume of water, which rushed down the new wooden bed with an angry roar, as if resenting the liberties which Mr. Delay had taken with it, forming a foaming cataract, as it tumbled into its old channel and hurries on to join the Kayderossaras, about half a mile distant.

Posted February 25, 2019, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

https://www.hudsonvalley360.com/article/engineers-present-fe...

Appears there may be some interest in preserving the trusses for a decorative feature along the bridge. Based on the design, I believe the trusses may actually date to the mid 1880s, and be relocated from another location.

Posted February 24, 2019, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks to Luke for adding information on this one. Looks like it would make a really good trail bridge.

Posted February 24, 2019, by Justin (jpumps14 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Is there any information on this bridge or about its history? I cant seem to find anything about it.

Posted February 18, 2019, by Luke

Cut-and-cover, like most airport tunnels, and the same design as the-one-that-shall-be-referenced-but-not-named.

FYI there's another one at this airport for you to add, Dana :')

Posted February 18, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

Hmmmm tunnelesque?

Posted February 18, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein
Posted February 12, 2019, by Mary Noe (noem [at] stjohns [dot] edu)

Did J. P. Morgan Jr. purchase the stones from this bridge on or about 1913 to build the bridge in Glen Cove to his mansion on Morgan Island (East Island)?

Posted February 2, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

Dunkirk Dave, Early Spring!

Posted January 27, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Yes... This is a Rezner Bowstring!

Posted January 27, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

Art and Clark, ended up at Alfred U with a Couple Hours to wait. Drove over and site visited replacement bridge. Bank profile as well at Canisteo River Bridge exhibit EXTENSIVE flood control work but believe Art to be correct.

Posted January 25, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

So NYDOT is evaluating whether to repair or replace this, eh?

Well - and the towers in the pictures make me think this is the same bridge as in the article I'm posting - Friday's incident where a cruise ship was ripped from its moorings and drifted downriver only to get wedged underneath the bridge, can't have helped matters.

https://www.dailyfreeman.com/news/local-news/boats-break-loo...

Posted January 14, 2019, by Luke

Thanks, the erroneous scrap date stemmed from https://www.flickr.com/photos/albanygroup/16288863091/in/alb...

Posted January 14, 2019, by Skip Albright (skipskip [at] gmail [dot] com)

I walked this bridge into the 1970's. it wasnt removed until the 80's

Posted January 6, 2019, by JOHN MC GRATH (jmcg40 [at] aol [dot] com)

I saw on a 1888 map that there was a bridge on this location before the 1931 bridge was built, By any chance would you have a picture of that bridge, Thank You John

Posted January 4, 2019, by Dana

When was this deck style common? haven't seen many

Posted January 2, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

My favorite NYC bridge... Hey, it's a truss!

Posted January 2, 2019, by Chester Gehman (gehmanc2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

The Bridge Girl

Posted December 31, 2018, by Luke

Erected by the compnay's forces using plans from William Barclay Parsons/Parsons Bricknerhoff.

https://books.google.com/books?id=HAHQQxqfkRMC&pg=PA541&dq=L...

Posted December 31, 2018, by Frank Mussaw (Frankm1 [at] cableone [dot] net)

Any idea where I can find the name of the company that built the LC & M tunnels in Port Henry, NY.

Posted December 26, 2018, by Barry (bllauver33 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Has one of the trusses been removed? I can see only two leafs in the Google Earth photo.

Posted December 25, 2018, by Dexter Funhouse
Posted December 15, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

West Branch or East Branch?

Posted December 15, 2018, by nur_sagen.............

None of us can view that.

Also there's multiple postcards that show these bridges and directly mention Fish Creek:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/jnos363/4805184399 (I see you, Art S.)

http://dcmny.org/islandora/object/waterways%3A638

Posted December 15, 2018, by Mary Fassett

That is NOT the Fish Creek Bridge...this is..

/var/folders/d2/_47k6d0s17122q1kcmjjhhhw0000gn/T/com.apple.iChat/Messages/Transfers/SJW07-06-03-53.jpg

Posted December 11, 2018, by Daniel

Bolts, on a bridge built in 1882?

Posted December 10, 2018, by Chester Gehman (gehmanc2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Disaster at the second bridge--In February of 1922,a crew began dismantling the second railroad bridge. As the five workmen were loosening bolts, the entire western span gave way, crushing and killing two men and injuring two others. The job was abandoned until scrap prices rose in the pre-World War II period, when the job was finally finished.

Black Bridge (New York)
Posted December 10, 2018, by Luke

Thanks Chester.

Black Bridge (New York)
Posted December 10, 2018, by Chester Gehman (gehmanc2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge was never associated with the Canajoharie & Catskill RR. The C&C went belly-up in 1842, only made it to Cooksburg, just over the Albany County line and a long way from Canajoharie.

There never was a Catskill Mountain and Cairo RR. The Cairo RR, which ran from Cairo Junction on the Catskill Mountain RR to Cairo was chartered as a separate corporation in 1884 until it was merged with the CM under a reorganization in 1916.

Catskill Mountain Railroad 1882-1885

Catskill Mountain Railway 1885-1916

Catskill Mountain Railroad 1916-1919

Source: "Rip Van Winkle Railroads" by William F Helmer, Howell-North Books, 1970

Posted December 4, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Are you guys talking about this bridge?

https://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=n...

Posted December 2, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Found it! Picture 12 and 14!