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Posted January 21, 2020, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

This is now in use as part of the Lackawanna Trail although it is still owned by the railroad.

Story on trail bridges in Elmira with old picture:

https://www.stargazette.com/story/news/local/2019/06/19/elmi...

Posted January 21, 2020, by Joel Young (joel [dot] young [at] protonmail [dot] com)

The info needs to be revised. The original bridge was built in 1933, but it was replaced in 1961, which still stands today, though it was closed in 2011 to all traffic including pedestrians.

Posted January 12, 2020, by Joel Wyman (ponchoman49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Sadly this bridge was removed in late 2018 due to the neglect of the Western side abutment which crumbled further so the bridge was removed and the remains of the crumbled abutment lay next to it. They even removed the little Groton bridge that sat next to the joining road. A seriously tragic loss that could easily have been prevented by repairing the Western abutment! Apparently the 2008 branding of being a historical place meant nothing in this case!

Posted January 5, 2020, by Luke

That's because I used your duplicate entry to make an entry for an un-added bridge.

All of your imagery was of the Bridge Street Bridge, and Lock Street was part of the long-span concrete arch. (I recognize the latter as my goof.)

Posted January 5, 2020, by Douglas Butler

There is no evidence this bridge crossing the North Branch Little Salmon River now your coordinates is way off Luke

Posted January 4, 2020, by Luke

I converted the entry to be for an unadded bridge.

Posted January 4, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Mike,something doesn't seem right here.The map is wrong for the bridge and the wrong waterway is mentioned.By the way,i think you were answering my question about the bridge deck sitting in the grass.

Posted January 4, 2020, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Looks like it to my old eyes

Posted January 3, 2020, by Geoff Hubbs (geoffrey [dot] hubbs [at] att [dot] net)

No question that Bridge St and Lock St were two separate bridges, also photo 3 of 4 under Lock Street is the Bridge St Bridge

Posted January 2, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Am I seeing things or is part of the deck sitting in the grass behind where the bridge was?It shows up on street view.

Posted January 2, 2020, by Anonymous

So why it says open to traffic if the bridge street bridge is really removed ? Seems like a duplicate entry to me

Posted January 2, 2020, by Luke

Lock Street was removed in 89.

Posted January 2, 2020, by Anonymous

Bridge already added as lock street

Posted January 1, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

To the person who took the pictures of the aqueduct ruins while standing on the ice on the river reminds you of me.I would've done the same thing.Takes guts to do that.

Posted December 26, 2019, by Luke

Nice projection there, Freud. Millennials (1981Ė1996) were literally children when the bridge was removed.

Posted December 26, 2019, by Joe Yoman (ponchoman49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

"Eye sore"!!!! Sounds like a bunch of whining Millennial's that weren't able to drive their semi's over it. Give me a break!

Posted November 28, 2019, by Rick McOmber (rickvic8 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

In the movie "The Irishman" I believe this bridge is shown towards the end, but I could be wrong.

Posted November 28, 2019, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

I just posted a video that I have had for years. It is the Brooklyn Bridge in 1899, when it still had an elevated rail. The quality is poor, but it opens a fascinating window into the past. I'll try to post others, as I have lots of silent films with LOTS of cool bridges!

Posted November 27, 2019, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Wo....very cool Nathan

Posted November 26, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Found a couple more photos of this bridge. Looks like a Whipple Arch to me.

Posted November 26, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The 3 span bowstring that carried the highway at this location is noted on a different listing, but in examining photos of the highway bridge I discovered in historical photos there also was a bowstring on the dam itself. It is a different design bowstring, not the same builder.

Posted November 26, 2019, by Geoff Hubbs (geoffrey [dot] hubbs [at] att [dot] net)

The 1943 topos show the R-O-W north and south of the river, but not the crossing location.

Posted November 25, 2019, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

I can't find a map showing a railroad crossing the Salmon River in the vicinity. The 1895 topo shows something crossing the river here but there is no RR or road to the south.

Posted November 24, 2019, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This one definitely looks like it was constructed of secondhand railroad trusses.

Posted November 17, 2019, by Matt Lohry

I just found the clip youíre referring to on YouTube; that sure looks like the one! Eagle eye!

Posted November 17, 2019, by Anonymous

Isn't this the bridge that was filmed at the closing of Sesame Street episodes like in the 80s(all the kids and maybe Barkley walking across)?

Posted November 16, 2019, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The 1947 Central Park quad shows this as Mosholu Parkway's earlier alignment. The adjacent bridge dates to 1992.

Posted November 11, 2019, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Likewise Chet!

Though I sometimes think I should have stuck with ephemera. :^)

Cheers,

Art S.

Posted November 10, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Beautiful portals on this bridge. Hopefully they will someday decide to restore it.

Posted November 10, 2019, by Chester Gehman (gehmanc2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks, Art. And I enjoy the historical photos you manage to find and post of our favorite subject.

Chet

Posted November 10, 2019, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Chester, Thank you for adding the pictures.

Sincerely,

Art S.

Posted November 8, 2019, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Too bad it is being torn down. Was restoration considered?

Posted November 8, 2019, by Karen K Reay (kreay [at] vims [dot] edu)

A storm destroyed this bridge in November 2019 and it is being torn down. This is very sad for our family members who have lived there all their lives. Many other bridges were destroyed during this storm and some people lost their homes.

Posted November 6, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Historical article attached.

Posted November 2, 2019, by Arnold Restivo (arestivo01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Update: This bridge was recently closed in October 2018 from any and all bridge traffic. Some of the serious deficiencies noted by a state inspection are I beam stringers that are pretty compromised especially the load bearing flanges which are severely corroded with the steel actually delaminating. There are other deficiencies noted in the state's report and the cost to put the bridge back into operation is estimated to be close to $75,000.

This bridge was built in 1915 to replace a wooden arch covered bridge. The Pt. Ben bridge was built in response the increased commerce from the newly built NYO&W Railway Wawarsing Station. Since the canal in Wawarsing was abandoned in 1898, the Pt. Ben Bridge became the life line for local businesses and lodging establishments for several decades.

The Pt. Ben Bridge was originally built by NYS and transferred to town ownership during a time when NYS was experiencing a financial crisis. Being a municipality attempting to deal with a continuing economic milaze and opioid crisis, there are little monies available to save this valuable bridge.

I am putting out an All Points Bulletin, asking for any historical or photos of this potential landmark from anyone who can help me. It is my intention to apply to have this camelback bridge designated as a National Landmark.

I can be reached at 845.896.5760 or at arestivo01@gmail.com Please help me save this bridge from the torch. Arnold Restivo

Posted October 31, 2019, by Roger Deschner (rogerdeschner [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nice article in the New York Times about the demise of this bridge. Article provides quite a bit of its history.

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/29/nyregion/squibb-bridge-br...

Posted October 30, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Luke, I found the photo you added on the Beacon Historical Society Facebook page. I can't add a link because I do not have a Facebook account.

Posted October 30, 2019, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Chester & Luke,

Here is an example of a Cooper's bridge: https://www.eriecanal.org/CedarBay.html (its listed here and on Nathan's site as well). The design of the verticals is different on the other bridge; I expect the Churchill Street bridge is earlier.

Cooper used Phoenix Column sections in his design and I suspect that is the source of the 1862 date and builder as the Phoenix Columns have the Phoenix brand and patent date of 1862 on them.

Although I'm not 100% certain yet, in my opinion its an early 1870's version of Cooper's design possibly made by Melvin A. Nash.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted October 29, 2019, by Luke

The Facebook page I'd referenced (But have since lost the URL for.) for the builder referred to the SIA article as a source.

Build date came from the newspaper article, so I don't doubt that it's in error.

And given the time frame it would've been Phoenix Iron Works IIRC.

Posted October 29, 2019, by Chester Gehman (gehmanc2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Phoenix Bridge Company--1884-1901

(Directory of American Bridge-Building Companies)

Posted October 29, 2019, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Chester,

Great picture!

Based on the picture, Iíd say Nathan is right and itís a Cooper (he used Phoenix Columns in his design). If so, and based on Nathanís prior post, you are right that it was made within a few years of Tioronda.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted October 29, 2019, by Chester Gehman (gehmanc2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

The on-going discussion of this bridge's lineage reminded me of an article in the SIA Newsletter at the time of its removal. Clipped from the issue of Jan-Mar 1979, it is attached. While its build date is still in question, it does establish the builder as Phoenix Bridge.

Posted October 29, 2019, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Melissa,

It definitely did!

Tony,

I generally agree that it isnít a reliable source, I personally do my best to stay away from the media (though it is entertaining if they try to say my last name on air :^) ) but often the the older articles that Melissa finds are surprisingly accurate. Anyway, itís a starting point.

Chester,

Not a chance regarding the builder. I opened with that idea; Nathan promptly put a fork in it. Melissaís second picture confirmed that tubular arch design doesnít match Reznerís. Regarding build date, maybe. So far the newspaper article says 1862 but we have no idea regarding the source/accuracy.

Regards to all,

Art S.

Posted October 29, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I have found with newspaper articles that anytime a date or length is given it is more times than not questionable. I often think they get it from someone who doesn't really know or they "Guesstimate".

Posted October 29, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Art, I hoped another photo would help !

Posted October 29, 2019, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Nathan,

Melissa's new picture (Thanks Melissa!) does suggest Cooper and Phoenix Columns for the arch structure. However, the webbing is different than the other Cooper I am aware of.

The 1862 date comes from Melissa's article. Its possible the author of the article was bad at math and the bridge wasn't 116 years old in 1978...

When I first looked at Carlton, it was listed as 1898 here and in the official records. After a little homework, the correct date of 1888 was determined. So, for now, the only info we have points to 1862. If more info comes to light, it may confirm or contradict this date.

I suspect the webbing configuration will lead us to the maker.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted October 29, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Visually, Cooper is what popped into my head, but I don't believe those bridges were built that long ago either. The patent dates to 1872 with a few bridges predating that by about 1-2 years, so honestly I just don't think there is enough evidence to make any guess at this point, more information is needed. My opinion is its a bridge best listed as builder unknown for the time being. HAER Documentation cites that in New York State a variety of propriety designs were built in the late 1860s and early 1870s in the state.

Posted October 29, 2019, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Nathan,

It was listed as a Phoenix Bridge Co. I have significant doubts. I marked it as Rezner due to certain similarities but concede that it isn't. You know the patents and builders well, it strikes me as an early regional design (maybe early version of Cooper's work?). Who do you think it is?

Regards,

Art S.

Posted October 29, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This bridge was built in 1862. The first Rezner patent is 1867. Also, the top chord is polygonal. This does not match other Rezner design bridges. Also, Dr. William Boal Rezner served in the 6th Ohio Volunteer Cavalry as Chief Surgeon of his brigade. His service began in 1861 and lasted 4 years. And while I have not been able to determine when he began building bridges, I think its safe to question Rezner as builder of this bridge while he was serving in other capacities.

Posted October 18, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Art,

The process of bridging the Hudson River at New York City was a complex and difficult one, and many different proposals were made over the years. This photo depicts one of the more famous proposals by famous engineer Gustav Lindenthal, featuring his trademark braced chain suspension bridge design which he often proposed for any long-span crossing, despite it never gaining popularity. If you will refer to page 3 in this historical document available on my coverage at HistoricBridges.org for the George Washington Bridge, you will see a rendering for the as-built George Washington Bridge, with the proposed stone covering in place, which was later canceled, although the design of the bridge itself was not changed. The design as built was NOT designed by Lindenthal nor is it a braced chain design. https://historicbridges.org/newyork/georgewashington/gwb1.pd...

Posted October 18, 2019, by Geoff Hubbs (geoffrey [dot] hubbs [at] att [dot] net)

Yes Art, this bridge would have been at 57th Street NYC, over 120 blocks south of the current GWB location.

Posted October 17, 2019, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

I know that the GWB was designed for the piers to have a stone facing. Due to the depression that expenditure was delayed. After a while people liked it the way it was and the stone facing was never applied.

With that in mind, is this an early rendering of the GWB of a completely different bridge for a different location on the Hudson?

Regards,

Art S.

Posted October 3, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I don't know how anyone could think this is the most famous or beautiful bridge in New York except for the family who its named after. Looks like voters agree. https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/03/nyregion/cuomo-license-pl...

Posted September 29, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

Its there! Need to go back with a canoe. And extra batteries and Wild Pig Repellant. Approach from Swede Road. "Road" ends but drivable. Area is home to dangerous wild hogs. CAUTION!

Posted September 29, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

Danger! This area hosts a large population of Ferel Sus Scrofa. They Are LARGE and aggressive. Take Care, and do not go alone!

Posted September 28, 2019, by Michael Israel (misrael [at] airvuz [dot] com)

Here's a drone video of the bridge to really see what it looks like:

https://www.airvuz.com/video/New-Yorks-Bear-Mountain-Bridge?...

Posted September 16, 2019, by Geoff Hubbs (geoffrey [dot] hubbs [at] att [dot] net)

This is a duplicate of Parker Street Bridge BH 26287

Posted September 13, 2019, by Anonymous

old picture

Posted September 13, 2019, by Ken Alger (kalger [at] tds [dot] net)

This bridge was demolished and built anew during 2018.

Posted September 9, 2019, by Frank Griggs (fgriggsjr [at] twc [dot] com)

According the Engineering record of September 29, 1906 it was built by the Oswego Bridge Company.

Posted September 9, 2019, by Anonymous

How about the large black iron bridge that spanned over the top of this? I clearly remember it.

Posted September 5, 2019, by Daniel

I'd call them (starting on the West) 1A, 1B, 2, 3. 1A and 1B appear to be connected so I'd call them the same bridge. I agree that 1B doesn't have rails.

No clue who owns them, just wanted to point out that 3 bridges is - IMO - the correct count.

Posted September 4, 2019, by Geoff Hubbs (geoffrey [dot] hubbs [at] att [dot] net)

I believe both west bridges were New York Central, the main line was 4 tracks in this area

Posted September 4, 2019, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Daniel,if you look on street view it looks like the middle span is abandoned because of no track on it.Is it abandoned and who owns it?Do you know,Daniel?

Posted September 4, 2019, by Daniel

Based on looking at Street View from under the bridge, I'd go as far as saying there are 3: the Western one that goes into the truss a little North (the Eastern side of which appears to have had the tracks removed), with a center girder, and then 2 separate Eastern spans. Driving along the road you can see sky above you in 2 different places.

Posted September 4, 2019, by Luke

Not a duplicate as there should be two entries, seeing as there's two sets of bridges on diverging tracks.

Posted August 29, 2019, by Geoff Hubbs (geoffrey [dot] hubbs [at] att [dot] net)

This is the same bridge as Bruckner Boulevard - Westchester Creek Bridge

Posted August 27, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Love the demolition photo

Posted August 24, 2019, by Geoff Hubbs (geoffrey [dot] hubbs [at] att [dot] net)

See Governor Mario M. Cuomo Bridge listing for pictures, etc.

Posted August 23, 2019, by Luke
Posted August 23, 2019, by Geoff Hubbs (geoffrey [dot] hubbs [at] att [dot] net)

I am 99% certain the truss portion dates to 1906 like the other ones (Lafayette Ave,etc) in the area over Amtrak

Posted August 18, 2019, by Luke
Ben's Bridge (New York)
Posted August 9, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

Thanks for Sharing!

Ben's Bridge (New York)
Posted August 9, 2019, by Geoff Hubbs (geoffrey [dot] hubbs [at] att [dot] net)

Pentax, probably an ME. Trains were my focus but I also liked bridges a props.

Ben's Bridge (New York)
Posted August 9, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

Geoff, what camera in 1975? NICE shot

Posted August 2, 2019, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The area seems too flat for this to have been a bore tunnel. Source?

Posted July 16, 2019, by Anonymous

This was a good resource, but the first 2 photos are f the Saunders Street Bridge, located a little further north in the Village.

Posted July 11, 2019, by Dave Frieder (drfrieder [at] aol [dot] com)

Leon Moisseiff was a consulting engineer for the Triborough bridge but the engineer of design was Allston Dana.

Posted July 3, 2019, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The 1953 quad shows this as a spur coming off the yard to the NW. It cuts across two lines, this one and another 100 yards to the NE. Same railroad.

Posted June 29, 2019, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

This may provide access to the navigation light on the point.

Posted June 25, 2019, by Anonymous

this bridge saved by demolition by the County in 2006-2007 by the residents of Toddsville and interested persons. Money was donated, the wooden boards wee replaced, barriers put there so only available as a walking,- wheelchair accessible- bridge. Can fish off it. Accessible from a turn off Greenough Road.

Posted June 24, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

Just a culvert, but about as good as it gets when off the street view NBI grid!

Posted June 8, 2019, by Joel Wyman (ponchoman49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge no longer exists as of 2019. Not sure why it was removed with little other than some rotted planks.

Posted June 7, 2019, by Geoff Hubbs (geoffrey [dot] hubbs [at] att [dot] net)

Watkins Glen State Park and Rainbow Bridge shown in photos are no where near here, but in Schuyler County

Posted June 4, 2019, by Tom Koller (Tk48states [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Found this stone tunnel today and was surprised at its height, can easily accommodate double stacks although I doubt any ever travel there.

Posted June 2, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

Predecessor Bridge?

Posted June 1, 2019, by Anonymous

=

Posted June 1, 2019, by Anonymous

*

Posted June 1, 2019, by Anonymous

*

Posted May 25, 2019, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Could be,Don.

Posted May 25, 2019, by Don

Sign next to the H&R Block bldg says Gowanda Veteran's Memorial Bridge.

Street view says September 2018. So, Labor Day?

Posted May 24, 2019, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Nice picture of the army tank.

Posted May 24, 2019, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks,Dana and Kay.Sounds logical to me.

Posted May 24, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

Posted a second Street View From Legion Drive, dated 2007. Would guess the Legion maintains flags. Nice touch.

Posted May 24, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

Street View from September 2018. Not sure of any reason other than patriotism. Good eye George.

Posted May 24, 2019, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I noticed flags on the bridge.Any significance with the flags on the bridge?

Posted May 9, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

You would have to see if county road records still exist for 1912 to get exact dates. I'm guessing it was completed in a few months.

Posted May 9, 2019, by Steven Griffith (Sgriffith_5555 [at] yahoo [dot] com )

When did they start building this bridge and how long did it take to complete is? Gaines Basin Truss Bridge.

Posted May 7, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

Community Really Embraced this Bridge

Posted May 7, 2019, by Joel Wyman (jwyman2242 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge has been closed for about 4 or more years with over grown grass on both approaches. It is to be replaced sometime this year but I was really hoping they would instead rehabilitate this one as these historical trusses are getting rarer by the year, especially one that is over 110 years old. The bridge itself looks in good shape other than peeling paint but the cement supports are getting rough. A re-hab like they did on Delta Dam would be easy enough.