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Posted March 13, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein
Posted March 11, 2019, by Luke

Fourth

Posted March 11, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

3 of 4

Posted March 11, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

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Posted March 11, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

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Posted March 10, 2019, by justsayin

Circle E dinner in Hanncock GREAT place to eat if in area

Posted March 10, 2019, by Chris Bigham (thebigham69 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Look here at Google Maps:

https://goo.gl/maps/HHiqyTURAeB2

Posted March 10, 2019, by Chris Bigham (thebigham69 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

When the Rt. 17 expressway was built through the Hawk Mountain, the tunnel entrances were covered with rock.

Supposedly, baby rattlesnakes populate the hill in the Spring where the southern entrance of the tunnel was located.

Posted March 10, 2019, by Chris Bigham (thebigham69 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Supposedly a local boy scout or girl scout troop gives tours of the tunnel. The tunnel lining is in excellent shape and is easy to walk through.

This tunnel was built to bypass 3 switchbacks. When the tunnel opened, the switchbacks were abandoned. A few traces of the switchback grade remains today.

Posted March 10, 2019, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Geoff,the first 2 pictures are of the ST-Hudson River Bridge,not the railroad the bridge was listed under.Out of curiosity I looked the bridge up along with the pictures and found it.

Posted March 10, 2019, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Geoff,the first 2 pictures are of the ST-Hudson River Bridge,not the railroad the bridge was listed under.Out of curiosity I looked the bridge up along with the pictures and found it.

Posted March 10, 2019, by Geoff Hubbs (geoffrey [dot] hubbs [at] att [dot] net)

The first 2 photos are of the existing B&M-ST bridge outside of Mechanicville NY

Posted March 9, 2019, by Dave Frieder (drfrieder [at] aol [dot] com)

The Bayonne bridge opened on November 15th 1931. NOT 1932.

Posted March 8, 2019, by Bob Naske (naskebob [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge is still in use . It still has the identification sign facing I90 traffic that says "D&H RR". Amazing!!

Posted March 7, 2019, by Jeff Wieland (jjwieland [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nice shots of the Alco PA's.

Posted March 1, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

Thanks Daniel!

Posted March 1, 2019, by Daniel
Posted February 28, 2019, by Dana

Sat view shows a mystery bridge just upstream in Ellicott creek?

Posted February 28, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein
Posted February 28, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

Truck eater, AGAIN!

Posted February 25, 2019, by Brendan Delay (brendanedwarddelay [at] gmail [dot] com)

The south pier stones just under the ties have the mason's marks of Patrick J. Delay, my great-grandfather, who was a stone mason for the Delaware & Hudson Railway. He finished his career as the Boss Stone Mason. My father found the mason's marks in the early 1970's and I located them in 2015 and 2016. Here is an article about his construction of an arch interurban railroad bridge in Saratoga County in 1907.

THE DAILY SARATOGIAN, THURSDAY, MAY 23, 1907

HAVE SHIFTED GEYSERS

BROOK TO ANOTHER BED

-------------------------------------

Difficult task for Workman at

Formel Property

-------------------------------------

BUILDING TROLLEY CULVERT

-------------------------------------

Work Preparatory to Connecting Tracks on New Saratoga-Schenectady

Line-Many Visitors

The preparatory work for connecting the trolley tracks of the Delaware & Hudson on the Formel property, south of the village is going on rapidly. The building of an addition to the culvert over the Geyser’s Brook was the most difficult part of the undertaking. That part of the work is in charge of Patrick Delay, master mason for the Delaware & Hudson, and the foundation work is about completed. Soon the arch will spring into shape, when the filling into a level with the present tracks will be comparatively easy.

Many visitors have been attracted to the spot since the work started, and most of them wondered how Mr. Delay would get that swift running stream out of his way while building the culvert. A solid foundation for the south side of the culvert was secured by blasting into a ledge of slate rock which rises abruptly on that side of the stream. To secure an equally good foundation on the north side necessitated forcing the brook out of its natural channel and running it into a new one. This was accomplished by a sluiceway, built of stout plank and boards, about eight feed wide, three feet deep and a hundred feet long.

One end of the sluiceway was run a short distance into the eastern end of the old culvert, the water forced into it, this artificial channel, carrying the stream completely out of the workmen’s way, and discharging it about a hundred feet further down stream.

Recent rains have largely increased the volume of water, which rushed down the new wooden bed with an angry roar, as if resenting the liberties which Mr. Delay had taken with it, forming a foaming cataract, as it tumbled into its old channel and hurries on to join the Kayderossaras, about half a mile distant.

Posted February 25, 2019, by Brendan Delay (brendanedwarddelay [at] gmail [dot] com)

THE DAILY SARATOGIAN, THURSDAY, MAY 23, 1907

HAVE SHIFTED GEYSERS

BROOK TO ANOTHER BED

-------------------------------------

Difficult task for Workman at

Formel Property

-------------------------------------

BUILDING TROLLEY CULVERT

-------------------------------------

Work Preparatory to Connecting Tracks on New Saratoga-Schenectady

Line-Many Visitors

The preparatory work for connecting the trolley tracks of the Delaware & Hudson on the Formel property, south of the village is going on rapidly. The building of an addition to the culvert over the Geyser’s Brook was the most difficult part of the undertaking. That part of the work is in charge of Patrick Delay, master mason for the Delaware & Hudson, and the foundation work is about completed. Soon the arch will spring into shape, when the filling into a level with the present tracks will be comparatively easy.

Many visitors have been attracted to the spot since the work started, and most of them wondered how Mr. Delay would get that swift running stream out of his way while building the culvert. A solid foundation for the south side of the culvert was secured by blasting into a ledge of slate rock which rises abruptly on that side of the stream. To secure an equally good foundation on the north side necessitated forcing the brook out of its natural channel and running it into a new one. This was accomplished by a sluiceway, built of stout plank and boards, about eight feed wide, three feet deep and a hundred feet long.

One end of the sluiceway was run a short distance into the eastern end of the old culvert, the water forced into it, this artificial channel, carrying the stream completely out of the workmen’s way, and discharging it about a hundred feet further down stream.

Recent rains have largely increased the volume of water, which rushed down the new wooden bed with an angry roar, as if resenting the liberties which Mr. Delay had taken with it, forming a foaming cataract, as it tumbled into its old channel and hurries on to join the Kayderossaras, about half a mile distant.

Posted February 25, 2019, by Brendan Delay (brendanedwarddelay [at] ameritech [dot] net)

THE DAILY SARATOGIAN, THURSDAY, MAY 23, 1907

HAVE SHIFTED GEYSERS

BROOK TO ANOTHER BED

-------------------------------------

Difficult task for Workman at

Formel Property

-------------------------------------

BUILDING TROLLEY CULVERT

-------------------------------------

Work Preparatory to Connecting Tracks on New Saratoga-Schenectady

Line-Many Visitors

The preparatory work for connecting the trolley tracks of the Delaware & Hudson on the Formel property, south of the village is going on rapidly. The building of an addition to the culvert over the Geyser’s Brook was the most difficult part of the undertaking. That part of the work is in charge of Patrick Delay, master mason for the Delaware & Hudson, and the foundation work is about completed. Soon the arch will spring into shape, when the filling into a level with the present tracks will be comparatively easy.

Many visitors have been attracted to the spot since the work started, and most of them wondered how Mr. Delay would get that swift running stream out of his way while building the culvert. A solid foundation for the south side of the culvert was secured by blasting into a ledge of slate rock which rises abruptly on that side of the stream. To secure an equally good foundation on the north side necessitated forcing the brook out of its natural channel and running it into a new one. This was accomplished by a sluiceway, built of stout plank and boards, about eight feed wide, three feet deep and a hundred feet long.

One end of the sluiceway was run a short distance into the eastern end of the old culvert, the water forced into it, this artificial channel, carrying the stream completely out of the workmen’s way, and discharging it about a hundred feet further down stream.

Recent rains have largely increased the volume of water, which rushed down the new wooden bed with an angry roar, as if resenting the liberties which Mr. Delay had taken with it, forming a foaming cataract, as it tumbled into its old channel and hurries on to join the Kayderossaras, about half a mile distant.

Posted February 25, 2019, by Brendan Delay (brendanedwarddelay [at] gmail [dot] com)

When was the stone bridge laid down? At the same time as the abutment on the south side of the road, maybe? I wanted to look at it for mason's marks last August but the Kiwanis was hosting a concert in the adjacent park serving snacks and popcorn. I did buy some popcorn and drank some water from the Big Red Spring.

I wonder if the workmen on the bridge project drank some water from the spring?

Posted February 25, 2019, by Brendan Delay (brendanedwarddelay [at] gmail [dot] com)

THE DAILY SARATOGIAN, THURSDAY, MAY 23, 1907

HAVE SHIFTED GEYSERS

BROOK TO ANOTHER BED

-------------------------------------

Difficult task for Workman at

Formel Property

-------------------------------------

BUILDING TROLLEY CULVERT

-------------------------------------

Work Preparatory to Connecting Tracks on New Saratoga-Schenectady

Line-Many Visitors

The preparatory work for connecting the trolley tracks of the Delaware & Hudson on the Formel property, south of the village is going on rapidly. The building of an addition to the culvert over the Geyser’s Brook was the most difficult part of the undertaking. That part of the work is in charge of Patrick Delay, master mason for the Delaware & Hudson, and the foundation work is about completed. Soon the arch will spring into shape, when the filling into a level with the present tracks will be comparatively easy.

Many visitors have been attracted to the spot since the work started, and most of them wondered how Mr. Delay would get that swift running stream out of his way while building the culvert. A solid foundation for the south side of the culvert was secured by blasting into a ledge of slate rock which rises abruptly on that side of the stream. To secure an equally good foundation on the north side necessitated forcing the brook out of its natural channel and running it into a new one. This was accomplished by a sluiceway, built of stout plank and boards, about eight feed wide, three feet deep and a hundred feet long.

One end of the sluiceway was run a short distance into the eastern end of the old culvert, the water forced into it, this artificial channel, carrying the stream completely out of the workmen’s way, and discharging it about a hundred feet further down stream.

Recent rains have largely increased the volume of water, which rushed down the new wooden bed with an angry roar, as if resenting the liberties which Mr. Delay had taken with it, forming a foaming cataract, as it tumbled into its old channel and hurries on to join the Kayderossaras, about half a mile distant.

Posted February 25, 2019, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

https://www.hudsonvalley360.com/article/engineers-present-fe...

Appears there may be some interest in preserving the trusses for a decorative feature along the bridge. Based on the design, I believe the trusses may actually date to the mid 1880s, and be relocated from another location.

Posted February 24, 2019, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks to Luke for adding information on this one. Looks like it would make a really good trail bridge.

Posted February 24, 2019, by Justin (jpumps14 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Is there any information on this bridge or about its history? I cant seem to find anything about it.

Posted February 18, 2019, by Luke

Cut-and-cover, like most airport tunnels, and the same design as the-one-that-shall-be-referenced-but-not-named.

FYI there's another one at this airport for you to add, Dana :')

Posted February 18, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

Hmmmm tunnelesque?

Posted February 18, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein
Posted February 12, 2019, by Mary Noe (noem [at] stjohns [dot] edu)

Did J. P. Morgan Jr. purchase the stones from this bridge on or about 1913 to build the bridge in Glen Cove to his mansion on Morgan Island (East Island)?

Posted February 2, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

Dunkirk Dave, Early Spring!

Posted January 27, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Yes... This is a Rezner Bowstring!

Posted January 27, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

Art and Clark, ended up at Alfred U with a Couple Hours to wait. Drove over and site visited replacement bridge. Bank profile as well at Canisteo River Bridge exhibit EXTENSIVE flood control work but believe Art to be correct.

Posted January 25, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

So NYDOT is evaluating whether to repair or replace this, eh?

Well - and the towers in the pictures make me think this is the same bridge as in the article I'm posting - Friday's incident where a cruise ship was ripped from its moorings and drifted downriver only to get wedged underneath the bridge, can't have helped matters.

https://www.dailyfreeman.com/news/local-news/boats-break-loo...

Posted January 14, 2019, by Luke

Thanks, the erroneous scrap date stemmed from https://www.flickr.com/photos/albanygroup/16288863091/in/alb...

Posted January 14, 2019, by Skip Albright (skipskip [at] gmail [dot] com)

I walked this bridge into the 1970's. it wasnt removed until the 80's

Posted January 6, 2019, by JOHN MC GRATH (jmcg40 [at] aol [dot] com)

I saw on a 1888 map that there was a bridge on this location before the 1931 bridge was built, By any chance would you have a picture of that bridge, Thank You John

Posted January 4, 2019, by Dana

When was this deck style common? haven't seen many

Posted January 2, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

My favorite NYC bridge... Hey, it's a truss!

Posted January 2, 2019, by Chester Gehman (gehmanc2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

The Bridge Girl

Posted December 31, 2018, by Luke

Erected by the compnay's forces using plans from William Barclay Parsons/Parsons Bricknerhoff.

https://books.google.com/books?id=HAHQQxqfkRMC&pg=PA541&dq=L...

Posted December 31, 2018, by Frank Mussaw (Frankm1 [at] cableone [dot] net)

Any idea where I can find the name of the company that built the LC & M tunnels in Port Henry, NY.

Posted December 26, 2018, by Barry (bllauver33 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Has one of the trusses been removed? I can see only two leafs in the Google Earth photo.

Posted December 25, 2018, by Dexter Funhouse
Posted December 15, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

West Branch or East Branch?

Posted December 15, 2018, by nur_sagen.............

None of us can view that.

Also there's multiple postcards that show these bridges and directly mention Fish Creek:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/jnos363/4805184399 (I see you, Art S.)

http://dcmny.org/islandora/object/waterways%3A638

Posted December 15, 2018, by Mary Fassett

That is NOT the Fish Creek Bridge...this is..

/var/folders/d2/_47k6d0s17122q1kcmjjhhhw0000gn/T/com.apple.iChat/Messages/Transfers/SJW07-06-03-53.jpg

Posted December 11, 2018, by Daniel

Bolts, on a bridge built in 1882?

Posted December 10, 2018, by Chester Gehman (gehmanc2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Disaster at the second bridge--In February of 1922,a crew began dismantling the second railroad bridge. As the five workmen were loosening bolts, the entire western span gave way, crushing and killing two men and injuring two others. The job was abandoned until scrap prices rose in the pre-World War II period, when the job was finally finished.

Black Bridge (New York)
Posted December 10, 2018, by Luke

Thanks Chester.

Black Bridge (New York)
Posted December 10, 2018, by Chester Gehman (gehmanc2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge was never associated with the Canajoharie & Catskill RR. The C&C went belly-up in 1842, only made it to Cooksburg, just over the Albany County line and a long way from Canajoharie.

There never was a Catskill Mountain and Cairo RR. The Cairo RR, which ran from Cairo Junction on the Catskill Mountain RR to Cairo was chartered as a separate corporation in 1884 until it was merged with the CM under a reorganization in 1916.

Catskill Mountain Railroad 1882-1885

Catskill Mountain Railway 1885-1916

Catskill Mountain Railroad 1916-1919

Source: "Rip Van Winkle Railroads" by William F Helmer, Howell-North Books, 1970

Posted December 4, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Are you guys talking about this bridge?

https://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=n...

Posted December 2, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Found it! Picture 12 and 14!

Posted November 29, 2018, by Luke

Both show up on historicaerials in the 1970s as farm bridges.

No topo map shows them as being crossed by a proper road, with a few topos showing them both with dashed markings associated with "4WD road" in the USGS map key/legend.

Posted November 29, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

That's it, was in area today didn't spot till home from Sat view. Road is a relative term in this area! Try and get there in better weather

Posted November 29, 2018, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

I assume you are looking at Road-Canaseraga Creek Bridge. Yes indeed!! And even a little further looks like an abutment

Posted November 29, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Nathan looks like another one just up stream

Posted November 20, 2018, by Patrick McCormick (pjmccormick1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The proper spelling is Genesee Street

Posted November 16, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Scheduled for Replacement 2018

Posted November 12, 2018, by Anonymous
Posted November 7, 2018, by Nick Ariemma (NYCWestShore [at] gmail [dot] com)

Interesting to note that the South Portal is marked 1903, while the North Portal is marked 1902.

Posted November 2, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Modified per

Posted November 2, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Great images!

Although I suspect it's a Whipple pony bowstring and that it was replaced rather than just removed...

Figured I'd beat Luke to it :^)

Regards,

Art S.

Posted November 1, 2018, by Elizabeth (abbiespamemail [at] gmail [dot] com)

It seems extremely creepy

Posted October 30, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Not sure if this is predecessor bridge at this crossing from 1907 view. Tiny Whipple?

Posted October 24, 2018, by Douglas Butler

Can anybody find out what railroad this bridge is used from?

Posted October 14, 2018, by GS

Tried to enhance it two more ways. Added the two new ones plus one of the previously posted photos to the bridge file.

Been a while since I've posted--gotta retrain the operator.

Posted October 14, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

GS,

For some reason your enhanced image isn't attached to this bridge. I think it does help. Can you enhance the other one as well?

Regards,

Art S.

Posted October 14, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] coom)

Dana,

I had checked that. I couldn't find a High Fall, NJ and High Falls, NY is elsewhere.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted October 14, 2018, by Dana

Visually many points correspond. Maybe High Fall NJ where card printed? Going to say 74.6 % probability ! Any one else?

Posted October 14, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Dom & Dana,

I found a second stereo view image that looks exactly like the first but looking upstream (note the railing, piers and dam). However, it is labeled High Fall, NJ. I think the label is incorrect. What to do you think?

Regards,

Art S.

Posted October 9, 2018, by webmaster (webmaster [at] portjervisny [dot] com)

Thought you might like this most recent update (09 Oct. 2018) projecting the new Neversink River Bridge in Port Jervis is now expected to be completed in about a year.

http://www.midhudsonnews.com/News/2018/October/09/PJ_bridge-...

Posted October 8, 2018, by Luke
Posted October 8, 2018, by Steven Williamson (stevenwilliamson68 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Great picture Luke. Where can I find pictures of the construction of the Guymard Cutoff?

Posted October 7, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

This was the site of the Yellow Brick Road scenes in the movie "The Wiz" (1978).

Posted October 4, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

The PBS NOVA special 'Operation Bridge Rescue' was fun to see but, unfortunately, much of it focused on the creation of this replica. The wood joinery was nice, but they seemed to spend more time explaining how the historic Chinese wooden arch bridges functioned than explaining the function of a truss or showing how different truss designs work.

Even sadder, they didn't spend time showing the restoration of original truss bridges, either wood or iron. Nor did they really explain the story of the evolution American truss bridge, just stating they were designed locally and organically to regional designs. I'm not sure if the educational content of NOVA has gone down or if this is on par for NOVA but I'm disappointed because I know something about the topic.

That said, its fantastic that the community found the resources to recreate this bridge and that the builders did a beautiful job.

Sincerely,

Art S.

Posted October 2, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Yes, most certainly Groton.

Posted October 2, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Groton Bridge?

Posted September 22, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Cady street is mislabeled as Clinton Street on G-Maps. Clinton Street runs NE-SW but the part extending toward the canal is the remains of Cady.

The 1908 map with bridge and mill is here:

http://www.historicmapworks.com/Map/US/17250/Lockport+001/

Posted September 20, 2018, by DC (teamouroboros [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge spans the Oneida River not the Seneca River.

Posted September 18, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Interesting shadow on sat views, any one near for a site visit?

Posted September 16, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Might actually be a Dam?

Posted September 15, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Per forum AKA Underwood bridge

Posted September 15, 2018, by Robert Ludlam (robert [dot] s [dot] ludlam [at] gmail [dot] com)

The bridge is known as Underwood Bridge. Is there some way for you to include the name here?

Thanks in Advance!

Posted September 15, 2018, by sat view

pipe line crossing in view on photo still extant on sat views

Posted September 14, 2018, by Seth Gaines (sethgaines [at] gmail [dot] com)

Comment is of course wrong. Bridge was there in 2011, but is gone now. Streetview has some really old and blurry views of the bridge, but the satellite view is much more current and shows it's been replaced by some boring concrete thing.

Posted September 10, 2018, by Luke

Nice find, Mike!

Posted September 6, 2018, by Anonymous

Same?

Posted September 6, 2018, by observation

Same?

Posted August 31, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

I'm sure that's the one George. Multi year project. had asked permission to photo new and old bridge but was told no. Honor that as a responsible bridge hunter.

Posted August 31, 2018, by George oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks,Dana and Kay.I saw a commercial about visiting New York and it showed this bridge with a N/S train going over it.I am pretty sure this is the bridge because the commercial mentioned the state park.I'm pretty sure this is the only bridge in the park,isn't it?

Posted August 30, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Mike if pin is correct must be "Old" Lake Avenue bridge in background!

Posted August 30, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

George this is new NS trestle, American Bridge Company, Cant view without Trespassing yet. Park Roads still closed in this area.

Posted August 30, 2018, by George oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Dana,where is the N/S trestle located?

Posted August 29, 2018, by Dana

Thanks for the assist Luke, Really awesome stonework every where n Park. Only put up the one culvert as example But many many on 20 mile drive through park. NS Trestle still closed for viewing though.

Posted August 29, 2018, by Luke

The CCC and WPA were two similar but different work relief programmes.

According to https://livingnewdeal.org/projects/letchworth-state-park-cas..., Letchworth was a CCC park, not a WPA park.

http://www.letchworthparkhistory.com/cccwork.html has more in-depth stuff about what was build by the CCC in the park.

Posted August 29, 2018, by Patrick McCormick (pjmccormick1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Was all the stonework within Letchworth State Park constructed by the WPA or the CCC during the Great Depression? Or was the CCC part of the WPA?

Posted August 27, 2018, by .....justsayin.........

…………..Begone foamers!...……….