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River Road Bridge

Photos 

River Road Bridge -- May 16, 2010

Overview looking towards Carpentersville

Photo taken by Raymond Klein

Enlarge

BH Photo #166465

Map 

Street View 

Facts 

Overview
Through truss bridge over Pohatcong Creek on River Road near Carpenterville, NJ and right next to the PRR Bel-Del RR bridge
Location
Carpentersville, Warren County, New Jersey
Status
Open to traffic
History
Built 1901; rehabilitated 1995
Design
Pratt through truss
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 115.2 ft.
Total length: 120.1 ft.
Deck width: 15.7 ft.
Vertical clearance above deck: 14.4 ft.
Recognition
Eligible for the National Register of Historic Places
Approximate latitude, longitude
+40.62493, -75.18553   (decimal degrees)
40°37'30" N, 75°11'08" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
18/484308/4497138 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Riegelsville
Average daily traffic (as of 2015)
275
Inventory numbers
NJ 2102015 (New Jersey bridge number)
BH 25645 (Bridgehunter.com ID)
Inspection report (as of April 2015)
Overall condition: Fair
Superstructure condition rating: Satisfactory (6 out of 9)
Substructure condition rating: Good (7 out of 9)
Deck condition rating: Good (7 out of 9)
Sufficiency rating: 73 (out of 100)
View more at BridgeReports.com

Update Log 

  • November 2, 2018: New photo from Art Suckewer
  • December 13, 2011: Updated by Frank Hicks: Added specific design info from historicbridges.org
  • May 27, 2010: Updated by Joshua Collins: added gps coordinates and street view
  • May 27, 2010: Updated by Raymond Klein: Added three photos. Carpentersville, NJ added to name, city and overview. Easton, PA to USGS. Next to PRR Bel-Del Branch bridge in picture & overview.

Sources 

Comments 

River Road Bridge near Carpentersville, NJ
Posted May 28, 2010, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Yes, a load-supporting arch was added. This has been done with a number of historic truss bridges.

River Road Bridge near Carpentersville, NJ
Posted May 27, 2010, by Robert Thompson

Um, what is up with THAT? Did it start as a truss bridge, and was later reinforced with an arch?