Recent New Jersey Comments

Post a comment Contact webmaster

Salem Bridge (New Jersey)
Posted January 19, 2019, by Don Morrison

It would seem that what google Maps is calling Salem River at the north side of Salem is actually Fenwick creek, which empties into Salem River. Bing Maps does not even indicate a waterway here in map view.

So the bridge was apparently on Market Street (45).

Salem Bridge (New Jersey)
Posted January 19, 2019, by Will Truax (Bridgewright [at] gmail [dot] com)

1831

I did a little digging and found the name and the builder's name and edited the entry accordingly.

An overview (and better images) can be found here > see pg's 20 & 21 > http://tiny.cc/85qj2y

I'm surprised the Bridgewright wasn't already represented here on the database in that he, like his son, had a long prolific career including multiple Railroad Bridges.

Posted January 19, 2019, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Don,

I'm pretty sure you are correct. I took the liberty of posting the pic, crediting you with finding the link.

We should probably use their essay to build the description.

Angela,

Can you post the location as you believe it to be?

Regards,

Art S.

Posted January 18, 2019, by Don Morrison

Here's a pic - looks like the same bridge. Says it crossed Fenwick Creek. Photo 10 of 56.

https://www.nj.com/salem/index.ssf/2015/10/salem_county_rewi...

Posted January 18, 2019, by Angela Allen (Chickiemom1 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I am thinking possibly it is the bridge (at one time) heading out of the city and towards Mannington. Just a guess. (I have that postcard too!)

Posted December 31, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

In doing homework including reading the bridge commission report from 2014 which contained the results of some historical research, the bridge's opening date of January 10, 1814 was determined. Thus making this bridge the third Delaware River bridge after Trenton (January 30, 1806 -less than 30 years after the signing of the Declaration of Independence!) and Easton (Oct. 14, 1806) and soon followed by the New Hope-Lambertville Bridge (Sept. 12, 1814).

The same research indicates that the bridge was "partly rebuilt" in 1829 (other sources say 1830) and the three NJ spans and two piers were washed away by the "Bridges Freshet" of January 8, 1841 (which knocked out 9 Delaware River crossings). As the bridge remained private during its entire history as a wooden bridge, and was not very profitable during its early history, I would suspect that the company would do only what was necessary to keep the bridge in service. With this in mind, I have only listed the covered bridge as two entries and am considering combining them into one as it seems that it was rebuilt and lost sections replaced but it could be argued that it was essentially the same bridge from 1814 - 1923. Any opinions?

Posted December 30, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Some videos of the reconstruction. It appears that the arches and side walls remained mostly intact. That said, everything else was replaced/gutted and reinforced. I guess my question is: is it still original or an outer decoration on a modern bridge? Here are some videos of the redo:

https://www.roadsbridges.com/stony-brook-bridge-princeton-nj

In this one there's a view of just piers, that's the spillway west of the mill wall:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-UeUQwYvsWA

Here's another video of the work. Note in the SE corner (upper left in much of the video) is the Quaker Road bridge a single arch stone bridge.

https://vimeo.com/237435559

Similar or same as first video:

https://www.facebook.com/AroraandAssociatesPC/videos/arora-a...

Prior to repairs:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1arD-YYQqhk

https://www.njtvonline.org/news/video/repairs-to-200-year-ol...

Posted December 17, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Nick,

Monster, yes. Beautiful is in the eye of the beholder... :^)

I'll eventually find and post all of the Delaware River covered bridges. The really cool one is the Lower Trenton Bridge (the 'Trenton Makes' bridge uses its original 1805 piers and abutments) a Burr arch made by Burr himself http://bridgehunter.com/nj/mercer/trenton/ it lasted until 1875-1876.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted December 17, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Holy crud, what a monster!! Beautiful.

Posted December 12, 2018, by Jim Fetchero (jfetch [at] aol [dot] com)

Here are some pictures of the PATH Hackensack Life Bridge, all taken on March 15, 1996 when I was able to visit the bridge.

Posted December 9, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Drove over this bridge today. The work was impressive and extensive. In reality, I only caught a passing glance. It appears to have included stabilizing the adjacent Quaker Road bridge and the remaining wall of the 1680 mill. While the work looks nice, I cannot comment on its historic integrity.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted November 24, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

BTW, this stream network was the where a series of shark attacks occurred in 1916 that is loosely the basis of Jaws. Look it up, its kind of interesting.

Posted November 24, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

<3

Posted November 24, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

I think you have the right spot for the old photo!

Posted November 24, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

maybe before this one? next county over

Posted November 24, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Luke,

You moved the marker to the wrong spot. The one on Little Street is a three span. This is a five span.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted November 24, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Nope, different one. Two span and no Phoenic columns.

Now we need to figure out where they go! Only the three span one has support for its location.

Posted November 24, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

not sure where this one was

Posted November 24, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Sorry wrong bridge. Deleted

Posted November 24, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Location of the five span bridge is a guess.

Posted November 24, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Pete,

Thanks for adding the picture!

Clark & Mike,

Thanks for confirming the location. I thought I had researched it and posted a location previously but it must have been another bridge.

Regards to all,

Art S.

Posted November 24, 2018, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

If that was you who added coordinates for it, then you've got it just about right, methinks. Seeing as Throckmorton Avenue is just the other side of that curve. And the guardrails along the curve now suggest there was a need for/use of a bridge at one time.

Posted November 23, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

According to:

http://www.digifind-it.com/redbank/_1878-1959/1941/1941-12-0...

Throckmorton's bridge is on East Front Street. (See the report on court case right below the word "December" on the front page.) If so, it can't be found using street view, so probably replaced.

Posted November 23, 2018, by pete snieckus (docbluefin [at] verizon [dot] net)

That "barn" in the background is now my house !!

Here is another picture if you'd like.

Posted November 16, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

To clarify, the pier is a separate entity. I've been meaning to list it and some of the of the cool bridge related remains of the Mercer & Somerset here but haven't gotten to it yet.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted November 16, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

To clarify, the pier is a separate entity. I've been meaning to list it and some of the of the cool bridge related remains of the Mercer & Somerset here but haven't gotten to it yet.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted November 16, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

There is debate as to whether the bridge was put in before the M&S folded but there seems to be reasonably strong evidence that it was. However, once the Reading was able to go through, the railroad, a division of the PRR, was taken up west of the Millstone in the late 1870s. That pier has been sitting there, abandoned, since the late 1870s!!

Regards,

Art S.

Posted November 16, 2018, by Luke

I believe this pier may be the pier mentioned in this: http://njrails.tripod.com/19th_Century/Mercer_and_somerset/M...

Posted November 16, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

pier

Posted November 16, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

ART just south of here google map has abandoned bridge pier. added can delete if not another bridge

Posted November 14, 2018, by Anonymous

This is not the Corsons Inlet Bridge. This is the Strathmere Bascule Bridge over Strathmere Bay. The Corsons Inlet Bridge is about a mile north of this bridge and crosses the Corsons Inlet and is a fixed steel girder bridge, also under Bridge Commission ownership but not tolled.

Posted September 17, 2018, by Anonymous

NOW its a swing bridge!

Posted September 15, 2018, by Luke

Jeff: If you look at the first postcard, the roadway begins on the right side of the bridge, and end on the left side.

Since it creates an "X", they called it "Criss-Cross Bridge".

Art: Check your email.

Posted September 15, 2018, by Jeff Wieland (jjwieland [at] gmail [dot] com)

Why is this bridge named "Criss-Cross"?

Posted September 15, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Luke, link? That sounds like fun!

Regards,

Art S.

Posted September 14, 2018, by Luke

Now now, don't tease him too hard or he'll make a YouTube video about you too. :')

Posted September 14, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

If I tell you, Douglas will draw it :^)

Posted September 14, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

was this a swing bridge?

Posted August 15, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

It is. They replaced the concrete span with a new one. I heard rumors that they would do this with the Bear Tavern Road truss because the prior bridge on the Valley road site (before 1973) was a King Through Pratt. I tried to get them to keep the truss intact elsewhere in the area but due to my health, I wasn't able to be as active in that pursuit as I had hoped.

Now the county is looking to replace the Mine Road Bridge due to minor damage from a tree. I'm trying to rally the locals but may need help.

Regards,

Art. S.

Posted August 14, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I believe the new location for the Bear Tavern bridge is this bridge.

The trusses were placed as non-functional decorations. http://mercerme.com/old-jacobs-creek-bridge-at-new-home-on-v...

Its been widened and the overhead bracing is really weird looking, its not consistent throughout the width. Not sure who came up with that design.

Posted August 11, 2018, by Johnny Regan (johnnybaseball64 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Bridge is actually over the paulinskill river on a county near 15 in Lafayette township, nj. Johnny regan Somerville, nj.

Posted July 19, 2018, by Andy Peters (anpete1971 [at] gmail [dot] com)

As of May 2018, this bridge still hasn't been replaced. Hopefully the project will never get off the ground and the bridge will never be replaced.

https://www.northjersey.com/story/news/columnists/john-cicho...

Posted July 19, 2018, by Andy Peters (anpete1971 [at] gmail [dot] com)
New Bridge (New Jersey)
Posted July 19, 2018, by D.Powelll (contactBCHS [at] bergencountyhistory [dot] org)

New Bridge was a strategic crossing in the American Revolution, the first bridge above Newark Bay.

Jan and Annetje (Ackerman) Zabriskie purchased the Johannes Ackerman mill and farm in September 1745, shortly after construction of the first draw-bridge at the narrows of the Hackensack River. This wooden span was called New Bridge to distinguish it from an older crossing several miles upstream. History by historian Kevin Wright who wrote the NR nomination. The 1889 Swing Bridge replaced earlier drawbridges at New Bridge.

New Bridge (New Jersey)
Posted July 19, 2018, by D.Powelll (contactBCHS [at] bergencountyhistory [dot] org)

New Bridge was a strategic crossing in the American Revolution, the first bridge above Newark Bay.

Jan and Annetje (Ackerman) Zabriskie purchased the Johannes Ackerman mill and farm in September 1745, shortly after construction of the first draw-bridge at the narrows of the Hackensack River. This wooden span was called New Bridge to distinguish it from an older crossing several miles upstream. History by historian Kevin Wright who wrote the NR nomination. The 1889 Swing Bridge replaced earlier drawbridges at New Bridge.

Posted June 15, 2018, by Matt Targa (mwtrag [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This GPS marker is off. It's a bit deeper in the woods. I actually was able to find it but couldn't get down the cliff, so I parked at the very entrance of the park by the playground and snaked my way down there and followed the old traintrack trail. when I got out the other end that must be where the GPS coordinates was telling me to go to. Then I followed a wide path much wider than a walking trail and it took me out to the road and someones house where that side said no trespassing. I told the owner i was sorry i came in the park side and he was cool. So that guys entrance which is much easier to get to the tunnel seems like private property but also the way the ATVs get to it and it's a house with a gate right after that overpass car bridge.

Posted May 7, 2018, by Shalom

Sorry, it's the western sidewalk that has the water main. Current street view *on* the bridge still shows the bridge with cars on it, but when you get to the approaches you see the barricades (albeit with the bridge still there beyond them).

Posted May 3, 2018, by Harry Livingston (livi9223 [at] aim [dot] com)

Are there any plans or a date for the scheduled replacement

of this bridge

Posted April 25, 2018, by Shalom

Also, when I first saw this page, I thought they were referring to another lost bridge. There was a crossing, also on Paterson Plank Road, from Secaucus across the Hackensack River to where the Meadowlands is now (40.805751, -74.060375). This bridge was of wood, and burned sometime in the 1940s and never got replaced; there is no longer any way to get from the Secaucus cul-de-sac to the other side of the river, or anywhere else, except by going back to Route 3.

This bridge seems not to be documented here. The old topo maps show a bridge there, as does the 1940 navigational chart of the Hackensack & Passaic Rivers; by 1969 (the next year the chart is available on line) it is gone.

Posted April 25, 2018, by Shalom

The coordinates posted here aren't the Berry's Creek crossing at Paterson Plank Road in Carlstadt, but some unrelated bridge miles west of there in Totowa. Also Paterson has only one T in it.

The correct co-ordinates of the Berry's Creek bridge are 40.828067, -74.079763.

Posted April 23, 2018, by Shalom

This bridge is now removed. It was still listed in the CFR as a movable bridge, but stated that it didn't have to be opened for water traffic (especially as the downstream 2nd (Market) Street Bridge was replaced with a fixed bridge, rendering this part of the river non-navigable), plus there's a water main that was run over the eastern sidewalk that wouldn't let them open it in any case. (I've never seen it with the counterweight in place.)

What's there now is only a narrow wooden pedestrian crossing that's basically balanced on top of that water main, and a lot of cranes and excavators etc. I don't know what they're putting in its place.

Posted April 16, 2018, by Amanda

Update: South Front Street is completely underwater for about 2 miles leading up to where the bridge once stood on either side.

NJDOT is discussing possibly erecting a bailey truss bridge once the floodwaters recede in order to reopen the crossing - however the permanent future of a bridge here (or lack thereof) is still uncertain.

Posted April 16, 2018, by Amanda

Much of this bridge was destroyed by flash flooding about an hour ago.

Although not officially confirmed by any sources, reportedly some substructure elements remain damaged but intact.

Posted April 16, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

They seem to be significant modern structures. It's odd that they would be closed and up for adoption/demo.

Posted April 15, 2018, by Luke
Posted April 15, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Any idea when the arches were built?

Posted April 11, 2018, by Johnny Gazick (johnny_g21 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

It is great seeing these pictures as my family and I grew up here and actually almost died on this bridge in circa 1968 while fishing off of it with my family. An unscheduled train came through and my father dislocated his ankle while running with me and trying to make it off of the other side. (similar to the scene from the movie "stand by me". My mother and sister climbed off of the side and hung on to while the train went by. I guess I was 2 years old.

Posted March 25, 2018, by Johnny Regan (johnnybaseball64 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is in Morris county, nj.

Posted March 7, 2018, by Geof (gwolfer [at] yahoo [dot] com)

For anyone who's interested, the trusses were restored, moved to Goffle Brook Park in Hawthorne, and are currently being used as a pedestrian bridge over Goffle Brook.

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.9463962,-74.1624506,69m/data...

Posted February 17, 2018, by Art S (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Title and location based on text on card. Could it be an early image one of the other cast iron Corwin Pratt Ponys still in existence?

http://bridgehunter.com/nj/hunterdon/new-hampton/

http://bridgehunter.com/nj/hunterdon/10XXG63/

http://bridgehunter.com/nj/warren/2102225/

Bayonne Bridge (New Jersey)
Posted December 8, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The Nov 13, 2017 edition of The New Yorker has a nice article on the project.

Posted November 25, 2017, by Don Morrison

Grover Cleveland got himself a bridge... and it's a lenticular pony.

Posted November 10, 2017, by George oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

As per an article printed in the Reading Eagle maintenance work will be performed including work on the overhead and underground tolling equipment this weekend possibly causing traffic delays.Work will be performed from Saturday to sunday.

Posted November 8, 2017, by Weewok (weewok [at] hotmail [dot] com)

New Jersey's oldest operating bridge reborn!

Photos at: http://s.nj.com/mDWERBM

Posted October 14, 2017, by Nathan Delaplaine (ndelaplaine [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge no longer operates.

Posted October 5, 2017, by ron ricchezza (ronrica2 [at] gmail [dot] com )

According to the The Pennsylvania Railroad Technical & Historical Society,,,(Highline article) the Crook Horn Swing bridge broke its gear on August 13, 1981,,, ending service to Ocean City. On Oct 5, 1981 service to Cape May was terminated,, ending all service to the shore's southern points...

Posted September 26, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Thanks Luke.

Posted September 26, 2017, by Luke

Different bridge with different bracings.

Posted September 26, 2017, by Nathan Delaplaine (ndelaplaine [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge no longer operates although it needs to get replaced with a non drawbridge span.

Posted September 26, 2017, by Nathan Delaplaine (ndelaplaine [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge no longer operates although it needs to get replaced with a non drawbridge span.

Posted September 26, 2017, by Nathan Delaplaine (ndelaplaine [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge no longer operates.

Posted August 24, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

They are lucky it was a single leaf bascule. Because of the way bascule leafs work, I doubt you would clear the gap in the middle, and even if you did you would crash into the abutment or into a tail pit. But a single leaf span the way they were apparently crossing, they just dropped down onto the fixed approach.

It is inexcusable that either the bridge tender did not visually confirm the bridge was clear (assuming its an on-sight bridge tender, they could step outside of bridge house if needed for better view in glare conditions), or if the bridge is remotely controlled (true for an increasing number of movable spans), the owner of the bridge needs to install additional cameras for the bridgetender to have a better view.

Posted August 24, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

"Father jumps car over open drawbridge in terrifying stunt to save family"

https://www.yahoo.com/news/father-jumps-car-over-open-161950...

Posted August 6, 2017, by Anonymous

Just saying.............Hate those people who think they know everything, they make it so difficult for those of us who do.......Just Saying

Posted August 6, 2017, by Justin

It's called the Higgins Mill Bridge because that's the name on the official name on the plaque.

Also:

https://bridgehunter.com/nj/somerset/18A0605/

https://bridgehunter.com/nj/somerset/18A0601/

Posted August 6, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

It states here that the mill was originally constructed in the "Early Nineteenth Century"... So about 200 years ago. And it was last reported in existence in 1881... 136 years. So I think that qualifies as more than 60 years.

Due to several different reasons (Mostly the negative influences of man)... Many of the rivers and streams in this country are only remnants of what they once were.

Posted August 6, 2017, by Robert Simmers (Robt [dot] simmers [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I'm not sure why you state this bridge location was once the site of Higgin's Mill. This waterway hasn't been able to turn a water wheel for the past 60 years - at least. How do you know that the builder knew the correct name for the waterway and didn't just cast a name he found convenient?

On your posting for the real Higginsville Bridge you reference Historicbridges.org - by Nathan Holth; yet you decline to accept the reference to Higgin's Mill as described in that source. http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=ne...

I fail to see how you have deduced that Higgin's Mill was located near this bridge from the source you quote above: "Snell's History." The description from that source could just as easily describe the old mill - known as Higgin's Mill back in the middle of the 20th century - near the intersection of Higginsville road and Woodfern Road.

I also don't see why you decline to acknowledge the existence of the crossroads settlement of Higginsville at that same intersection - a place still in existence, although not an incorporated community. Holth refers to Higginsville in his reference to the South Bridge of the Higginsville Road: http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=ne...

Posted July 3, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Art,when was this current bridge put in?I am from Quakertown Pa and when i was of age living in Hatfield Pa i used to cross over into N.J. via Milford to make beer runs when the drinking age was 18 in N.J.Of course the drinking age was 21 in Pa at the time.Also when i crossed over it was at night so as not to raise suspicions from the cops.

Posted July 1, 2017, by Andrew Pearce (apearce2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

You are correct, it is not a formal through truss because there are no connections at the top between the sides. However it is an extremely tall pony. If I recall correctly, the thing is at least 12 feet tall. Maybe 15. But pony or not, how often do you see an "I built it" truss bridge?

Posted July 1, 2017, by Andrew Pearce (apearce2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Excellent find Art, thanks very much.

CNJ - PD Draw (New Jersey)
Posted June 14, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thank you Luke.That's the bridge i was talking about.

CNJ - PD Draw (New Jersey)
Posted June 13, 2017, by Luke
CNJ - PD Draw (New Jersey)
Posted June 13, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I noticed a trestle and bridge pilings on the Hackensack River if you follow this rail line.Are they on Bridgehunters?

CNJ - PD Draw (New Jersey)
Posted June 13, 2017, by Jeff Brown (jbrown03 [at] optonline [dot] net)

I recall working on that bridge in mid 1977. I was part of the Conrail Signal Gang stationed in Eport. John Farrell was our Foreman. A bridge tender named "Matty" would row out to the open bridge in the morning and close it for freight moves. At the end of his tour, he would open it for river traffic and row back to shore.

Bassetts Bridge (New Jersey)
Posted April 28, 2017, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted April 24, 2017, by Loretta Killian (KillianLoretta [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I see this is listed as still actually used!! Wow!! It is beautiful!!

Thanks for using my pix of it. It is a fav subject of mine. I need to get over there again and photograph it.

I read in a CNJ history that the line was completed to Phillipsburg in 1852 so this bridge was probably built about 1850--52!! You just can't beat that craftsmanship!! Very few of the bricks have fallen out over like 165 years of heavy locomotives and carloads of coal and everything else. Truly amazing. I found it accidentally while driving the older alignments of Old US 22/Easton Turnpike/New Brunswick Turnpike.

Posted March 10, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

As per an article printed in the Reading Eagle on 3-10-17 this bridge re-opened late Thursday after being closed for almost 2 months.The fractured I-beam has been repaired and tests have been run on the bridge which showed the bridge can handle the traffic.

Posted March 6, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

As per an article printed in the Reading Eagle on 3-4-17 this bridge is on track to open in about a month according to engineers overseeing the repairs.No definite cause has been nailed down yet but there are plenty of guesses including the weather,plugs welds and even traffic.When the bridge reopens and the authorities do find a definite cause i will gladly put it on this site.

Iron Bridge (New Jersey)
Posted February 26, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The Lattice inside the Arch would suggest Mosely, it's definitely not a Reznor.

Iron Bridge (New Jersey)
Posted February 26, 2017, by Michael Quiet (mquiet [at] gmail [dot] com)

Art,

I wasn't actually familiar with those designs...its kinda amazing how many unique designs for bowstrings occurred. Even Mosley did a few different models aside from the Hares Hill bridge:

http://bridgehunter.com/vt/bennington/mosley/

http://bridgehunter.com/nh/sullivan/bh49549/

It looked to me like the arch was a T section like the Hares Hill one, hence my leaning with that. Irregardless, its tough doing precision identification based off old postcards :P

Iron Bridge (New Jersey)
Posted February 25, 2017, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Michael,

I take back my previous comment. I didn't realize Hares Hill was a Moseley design. I think it's arch design doesn't match but the lattice does.

Regards,

Art S.

Iron Bridge (New Jersey)
Posted February 25, 2017, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Michael,

To me it's either a Henszey like this one:

https://bridgehunter.com/pa/lancaster/conestoga-creek/

Or a Rezner / Ohio Bridge Co. Like this one:

https://bridgehunter.com/ny/dutchess/tioronda/

I'm now leaning towards Henszey as I think the arch cross-section is the same. Moseley has a simpler triangular cross-section so, to me a less likely candidate.

Regards,

Art S.

Iron Bridge (New Jersey)
Posted February 25, 2017, by Michael Quiet (mquiet [at] gmail [dot] com)

This looks like it might be a small Mosley Lattice bowstring/arch. Compare with the last remaining example:

http://bridgehunter.com/pa/chester/hares-hill/

Posted February 20, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Here is the latest on this bridge as per an article printed in the Reading Eagle on 2-18-17.Contractors have been named to do the work on this bridge.The plans to repair this bridge have not changed.No cost estimate is available yet.Opening of this bridge is set for early April.Officials still hope the damaged I-beam can be repaired by constructing a permanent splice to reconnect the damaged section.Before that can be done crews must first realign the bisected segment by deploying 8 temporary towers and hydraulic jacks to return the span to its original position.The construction contractors include Allied Painting Inc.,Cornell and Company Inc.,Moretrench American Corp. and PKF Mark III.I have the article if anybody needs to know anything.

Posted February 9, 2017, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Maria: Its actually the county you would most likely need to contact, as it appears to be a county-owned bridge.

Posted February 9, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hi Maria:

I would recommend contacting the city about this matter. Those of us who contribute to Bridgehunter like to see bridges maintained, including lighting, but having no ownership of this bridge, we have no say in its maintenance.

Good luck with this. Feel free to reference this website in your quest to have the problem fixed.

Robert

Posted February 9, 2017, by Maria Elena (meem06 [at] aol [dot] com)

Please Please have the light bulbs in those beautiful light fixtures replaced! I go over this bridge everyday to & from work..and its so sad to see this bridge looking so absolutly neglected..Bulbs have been out for months now.And some of the light fixtures are broken..it is really falling in to disrepair & needs to be addressed asap.. Its dark & depressing while going over it!!!

I will send photos if needed...

Thank you very much for your prompt attention to this matter.

A taxpayer of ventnor....

Posted February 9, 2017, by Maria Elena (meem06 [at] aol [dot] com)

Please Please have the light bulbs in those beautiful light fixtures replaced! I go over this bridge everyday to & from work..and its so sad to see this bridge looking so absolutly neglected..Bulbs have been out for months now.And some of the light fixtures are broken..it is really falling in to disrepair & needs to be addressed asap.. Its dark & depressing while going over it!!!

I will send photos if needed...

Thank you very much for your prompt attention to this matter.

A taxpayer of ventnor....

Posted February 4, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Got some more information on this bridge.As per an article printed in the Reading Eagle on 2-4-17 this bridge will remain closed for at least 8 more weeks through early April.The Pa Turnpike Commission and the N.J. Transportation Authority who are joint owners of the bridge said an April reopening represents a best-case scenario,provided a more complex partial reconstruction or even replacement of the entire structure is not necessary.I have seen the pictures of this fracture and it did not look good.When i find out through the media what is going to happen with the repair or possible replacement i will let everyone know.

Posted January 24, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I have more information on this bridge.As per an article in the Reading Eagle on 1-24-17 engineers will need at least 2 weeks to get a handle on the repairs needed to fix this bridge.One of the support beams fractured cleanly into 2 pieces-a highly unusual event which had some experts suspecting a flawed,6 decade old weld.This bridge was closed indefinitely after workers discovered the broken steel truss last week.Photos posted on the Pa Turnpike Commission website showed a massive I-beam under the bridge's westbound lanes sheared in half.Officials believe the 14 inch truss failed recently and suddenly.Scientists at Lehigh University are analyzing a piece of the fractured beam to help determine the cause of the failure.In addition to holes that were mistakenly drilled into the beams during construction and filled with plug welds along with wear and tear on the steel,experts are also looking at possible flaws in materials or design.Work is underway to stabilize the bridge which sunk slightly.Crews have installed steel plates to brace the fractured beam and will jack the bridge back to its original position.The bridge will rest on 8 temporary towers.The daily traffic count according to the Reading Eagle article is actually 42,000 i'm guessing as of 2016.I will post any more information i get on this bridge.