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Posted August 15, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

It is. They replaced the concrete span with a new one. I heard rumors that they would do this with the Bear Tavern Road truss because the prior bridge on the Valley road site (before 1973) was a King Through Pratt. I tried to get them to keep the truss intact elsewhere in the area but due to my health, I wasn't able to be as active in that pursuit as I had hoped.

Now the county is looking to replace the Mine Road Bridge due to minor damage from a tree. I'm trying to rally the locals but may need help.

Regards,

Art. S.

Posted August 14, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I believe the new location for the Bear Tavern bridge is this bridge.

The trusses were placed as non-functional decorations. http://mercerme.com/old-jacobs-creek-bridge-at-new-home-on-v...

Its been widened and the overhead bracing is really weird looking, its not consistent throughout the width. Not sure who came up with that design.

Posted August 11, 2018, by Johnny Regan (johnnybaseball64 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Bridge is actually over the paulinskill river on a county near 15 in Lafayette township, nj. Johnny regan Somerville, nj.

Posted July 19, 2018, by Andy Peters (anpete1971 [at] gmail [dot] com)

As of May 2018, this bridge still hasn't been replaced. Hopefully the project will never get off the ground and the bridge will never be replaced.

https://www.northjersey.com/story/news/columnists/john-cicho...

Posted July 19, 2018, by Andy Peters (anpete1971 [at] gmail [dot] com)
New Bridge (New Jersey)
Posted July 19, 2018, by D.Powelll (contactBCHS [at] bergencountyhistory [dot] org)

New Bridge was a strategic crossing in the American Revolution, the first bridge above Newark Bay.

Jan and Annetje (Ackerman) Zabriskie purchased the Johannes Ackerman mill and farm in September 1745, shortly after construction of the first draw-bridge at the narrows of the Hackensack River. This wooden span was called New Bridge to distinguish it from an older crossing several miles upstream. History by historian Kevin Wright who wrote the NR nomination. The 1889 Swing Bridge replaced earlier drawbridges at New Bridge.

New Bridge (New Jersey)
Posted July 19, 2018, by D.Powelll (contactBCHS [at] bergencountyhistory [dot] org)

New Bridge was a strategic crossing in the American Revolution, the first bridge above Newark Bay.

Jan and Annetje (Ackerman) Zabriskie purchased the Johannes Ackerman mill and farm in September 1745, shortly after construction of the first draw-bridge at the narrows of the Hackensack River. This wooden span was called New Bridge to distinguish it from an older crossing several miles upstream. History by historian Kevin Wright who wrote the NR nomination. The 1889 Swing Bridge replaced earlier drawbridges at New Bridge.

Posted June 15, 2018, by Matt Targa (mwtrag [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This GPS marker is off. It's a bit deeper in the woods. I actually was able to find it but couldn't get down the cliff, so I parked at the very entrance of the park by the playground and snaked my way down there and followed the old traintrack trail. when I got out the other end that must be where the GPS coordinates was telling me to go to. Then I followed a wide path much wider than a walking trail and it took me out to the road and someones house where that side said no trespassing. I told the owner i was sorry i came in the park side and he was cool. So that guys entrance which is much easier to get to the tunnel seems like private property but also the way the ATVs get to it and it's a house with a gate right after that overpass car bridge.

Posted May 7, 2018, by Shalom

Sorry, it's the western sidewalk that has the water main. Current street view *on* the bridge still shows the bridge with cars on it, but when you get to the approaches you see the barricades (albeit with the bridge still there beyond them).

Posted May 3, 2018, by Harry Livingston (livi9223 [at] aim [dot] com)

Are there any plans or a date for the scheduled replacement

of this bridge

Posted April 25, 2018, by Shalom

Also, when I first saw this page, I thought they were referring to another lost bridge. There was a crossing, also on Paterson Plank Road, from Secaucus across the Hackensack River to where the Meadowlands is now (40.805751, -74.060375). This bridge was of wood, and burned sometime in the 1940s and never got replaced; there is no longer any way to get from the Secaucus cul-de-sac to the other side of the river, or anywhere else, except by going back to Route 3.

This bridge seems not to be documented here. The old topo maps show a bridge there, as does the 1940 navigational chart of the Hackensack & Passaic Rivers; by 1969 (the next year the chart is available on line) it is gone.

Posted April 25, 2018, by Shalom

The coordinates posted here aren't the Berry's Creek crossing at Paterson Plank Road in Carlstadt, but some unrelated bridge miles west of there in Totowa. Also Paterson has only one T in it.

The correct co-ordinates of the Berry's Creek bridge are 40.828067, -74.079763.

Posted April 23, 2018, by Shalom

This bridge is now removed. It was still listed in the CFR as a movable bridge, but stated that it didn't have to be opened for water traffic (especially as the downstream 2nd (Market) Street Bridge was replaced with a fixed bridge, rendering this part of the river non-navigable), plus there's a water main that was run over the eastern sidewalk that wouldn't let them open it in any case. (I've never seen it with the counterweight in place.)

What's there now is only a narrow wooden pedestrian crossing that's basically balanced on top of that water main, and a lot of cranes and excavators etc. I don't know what they're putting in its place.

Posted April 16, 2018, by Amanda

Update: South Front Street is completely underwater for about 2 miles leading up to where the bridge once stood on either side.

NJDOT is discussing possibly erecting a bailey truss bridge once the floodwaters recede in order to reopen the crossing - however the permanent future of a bridge here (or lack thereof) is still uncertain.

Posted April 16, 2018, by Amanda

Much of this bridge was destroyed by flash flooding about an hour ago.

Although not officially confirmed by any sources, reportedly some substructure elements remain damaged but intact.

Posted April 16, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

They seem to be significant modern structures. It's odd that they would be closed and up for adoption/demo.

Posted April 15, 2018, by Luke
Posted April 15, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Any idea when the arches were built?

Posted April 11, 2018, by Johnny Gazick (johnny_g21 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

It is great seeing these pictures as my family and I grew up here and actually almost died on this bridge in circa 1968 while fishing off of it with my family. An unscheduled train came through and my father dislocated his ankle while running with me and trying to make it off of the other side. (similar to the scene from the movie "stand by me". My mother and sister climbed off of the side and hung on to while the train went by. I guess I was 2 years old.

Posted March 25, 2018, by Johnny Regan (johnnybaseball64 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is in Morris county, nj.

Posted March 7, 2018, by Geof (gwolfer [at] yahoo [dot] com)

For anyone who's interested, the trusses were restored, moved to Goffle Brook Park in Hawthorne, and are currently being used as a pedestrian bridge over Goffle Brook.

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.9463962,-74.1624506,69m/data...

Posted February 17, 2018, by Art S (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Title and location based on text on card. Could it be an early image one of the other cast iron Corwin Pratt Ponys still in existence?

http://bridgehunter.com/nj/hunterdon/new-hampton/

http://bridgehunter.com/nj/hunterdon/10XXG63/

http://bridgehunter.com/nj/warren/2102225/

Bayonne Bridge (New Jersey)
Posted December 8, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The Nov 13, 2017 edition of The New Yorker has a nice article on the project.

Posted November 25, 2017, by Don Morrison

Grover Cleveland got himself a bridge... and it's a lenticular pony.

Posted November 10, 2017, by George oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

As per an article printed in the Reading Eagle maintenance work will be performed including work on the overhead and underground tolling equipment this weekend possibly causing traffic delays.Work will be performed from Saturday to sunday.

Posted November 8, 2017, by Weewok (weewok [at] hotmail [dot] com)

New Jersey's oldest operating bridge reborn!

Photos at: http://s.nj.com/mDWERBM

Posted October 14, 2017, by Nathan Delaplaine (ndelaplaine [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge no longer operates.

Posted October 5, 2017, by ron ricchezza (ronrica2 [at] gmail [dot] com )

According to the The Pennsylvania Railroad Technical & Historical Society,,,(Highline article) the Crook Horn Swing bridge broke its gear on August 13, 1981,,, ending service to Ocean City. On Oct 5, 1981 service to Cape May was terminated,, ending all service to the shore's southern points...

Posted September 26, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Thanks Luke.

Posted September 26, 2017, by Luke

Different bridge with different bracings.

Posted September 26, 2017, by Nathan Delaplaine (ndelaplaine [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge no longer operates although it needs to get replaced with a non drawbridge span.

Posted September 26, 2017, by Nathan Delaplaine (ndelaplaine [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge no longer operates although it needs to get replaced with a non drawbridge span.

Posted September 26, 2017, by Nathan Delaplaine (ndelaplaine [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge no longer operates.

Posted August 24, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

They are lucky it was a single leaf bascule. Because of the way bascule leafs work, I doubt you would clear the gap in the middle, and even if you did you would crash into the abutment or into a tail pit. But a single leaf span the way they were apparently crossing, they just dropped down onto the fixed approach.

It is inexcusable that either the bridge tender did not visually confirm the bridge was clear (assuming its an on-sight bridge tender, they could step outside of bridge house if needed for better view in glare conditions), or if the bridge is remotely controlled (true for an increasing number of movable spans), the owner of the bridge needs to install additional cameras for the bridgetender to have a better view.

Posted August 24, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

"Father jumps car over open drawbridge in terrifying stunt to save family"

https://www.yahoo.com/news/father-jumps-car-over-open-161950...

Posted August 6, 2017, by Anonymous

Just saying.............Hate those people who think they know everything, they make it so difficult for those of us who do.......Just Saying

Posted August 6, 2017, by Justin

It's called the Higgins Mill Bridge because that's the name on the official name on the plaque.

Also:

https://bridgehunter.com/nj/somerset/18A0605/

https://bridgehunter.com/nj/somerset/18A0601/

Posted August 6, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

It states here that the mill was originally constructed in the "Early Nineteenth Century"... So about 200 years ago. And it was last reported in existence in 1881... 136 years. So I think that qualifies as more than 60 years.

Due to several different reasons (Mostly the negative influences of man)... Many of the rivers and streams in this country are only remnants of what they once were.

Posted August 6, 2017, by Robert Simmers (Robt [dot] simmers [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I'm not sure why you state this bridge location was once the site of Higgin's Mill. This waterway hasn't been able to turn a water wheel for the past 60 years - at least. How do you know that the builder knew the correct name for the waterway and didn't just cast a name he found convenient?

On your posting for the real Higginsville Bridge you reference Historicbridges.org - by Nathan Holth; yet you decline to accept the reference to Higgin's Mill as described in that source. http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=ne...

I fail to see how you have deduced that Higgin's Mill was located near this bridge from the source you quote above: "Snell's History." The description from that source could just as easily describe the old mill - known as Higgin's Mill back in the middle of the 20th century - near the intersection of Higginsville road and Woodfern Road.

I also don't see why you decline to acknowledge the existence of the crossroads settlement of Higginsville at that same intersection - a place still in existence, although not an incorporated community. Holth refers to Higginsville in his reference to the South Bridge of the Higginsville Road: http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=ne...

Posted July 3, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Art,when was this current bridge put in?I am from Quakertown Pa and when i was of age living in Hatfield Pa i used to cross over into N.J. via Milford to make beer runs when the drinking age was 18 in N.J.Of course the drinking age was 21 in Pa at the time.Also when i crossed over it was at night so as not to raise suspicions from the cops.

Posted July 1, 2017, by Andrew Pearce (apearce2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

You are correct, it is not a formal through truss because there are no connections at the top between the sides. However it is an extremely tall pony. If I recall correctly, the thing is at least 12 feet tall. Maybe 15. But pony or not, how often do you see an "I built it" truss bridge?

Posted July 1, 2017, by Andrew Pearce (apearce2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Excellent find Art, thanks very much.

CNJ - PD Draw (New Jersey)
Posted June 14, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thank you Luke.That's the bridge i was talking about.

CNJ - PD Draw (New Jersey)
Posted June 13, 2017, by Luke
CNJ - PD Draw (New Jersey)
Posted June 13, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I noticed a trestle and bridge pilings on the Hackensack River if you follow this rail line.Are they on Bridgehunters?

CNJ - PD Draw (New Jersey)
Posted June 13, 2017, by Jeff Brown (jbrown03 [at] optonline [dot] net)

I recall working on that bridge in mid 1977. I was part of the Conrail Signal Gang stationed in Eport. John Farrell was our Foreman. A bridge tender named "Matty" would row out to the open bridge in the morning and close it for freight moves. At the end of his tour, he would open it for river traffic and row back to shore.

Bassetts Bridge (New Jersey)
Posted April 28, 2017, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted April 24, 2017, by Loretta Killian (KillianLoretta [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I see this is listed as still actually used!! Wow!! It is beautiful!!

Thanks for using my pix of it. It is a fav subject of mine. I need to get over there again and photograph it.

I read in a CNJ history that the line was completed to Phillipsburg in 1852 so this bridge was probably built about 1850--52!! You just can't beat that craftsmanship!! Very few of the bricks have fallen out over like 165 years of heavy locomotives and carloads of coal and everything else. Truly amazing. I found it accidentally while driving the older alignments of Old US 22/Easton Turnpike/New Brunswick Turnpike.

Posted March 10, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

As per an article printed in the Reading Eagle on 3-10-17 this bridge re-opened late Thursday after being closed for almost 2 months.The fractured I-beam has been repaired and tests have been run on the bridge which showed the bridge can handle the traffic.

Posted March 6, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

As per an article printed in the Reading Eagle on 3-4-17 this bridge is on track to open in about a month according to engineers overseeing the repairs.No definite cause has been nailed down yet but there are plenty of guesses including the weather,plugs welds and even traffic.When the bridge reopens and the authorities do find a definite cause i will gladly put it on this site.

Iron Bridge (New Jersey)
Posted February 26, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The Lattice inside the Arch would suggest Mosely, it's definitely not a Reznor.

Iron Bridge (New Jersey)
Posted February 26, 2017, by Michael Quiet (mquiet [at] gmail [dot] com)

Art,

I wasn't actually familiar with those designs...its kinda amazing how many unique designs for bowstrings occurred. Even Mosley did a few different models aside from the Hares Hill bridge:

http://bridgehunter.com/vt/bennington/mosley/

http://bridgehunter.com/nh/sullivan/bh49549/

It looked to me like the arch was a T section like the Hares Hill one, hence my leaning with that. Irregardless, its tough doing precision identification based off old postcards :P

Iron Bridge (New Jersey)
Posted February 25, 2017, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Michael,

I take back my previous comment. I didn't realize Hares Hill was a Moseley design. I think it's arch design doesn't match but the lattice does.

Regards,

Art S.

Iron Bridge (New Jersey)
Posted February 25, 2017, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Michael,

To me it's either a Henszey like this one:

https://bridgehunter.com/pa/lancaster/conestoga-creek/

Or a Rezner / Ohio Bridge Co. Like this one:

https://bridgehunter.com/ny/dutchess/tioronda/

I'm now leaning towards Henszey as I think the arch cross-section is the same. Moseley has a simpler triangular cross-section so, to me a less likely candidate.

Regards,

Art S.

Iron Bridge (New Jersey)
Posted February 25, 2017, by Michael Quiet (mquiet [at] gmail [dot] com)

This looks like it might be a small Mosley Lattice bowstring/arch. Compare with the last remaining example:

http://bridgehunter.com/pa/chester/hares-hill/

Posted February 20, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Here is the latest on this bridge as per an article printed in the Reading Eagle on 2-18-17.Contractors have been named to do the work on this bridge.The plans to repair this bridge have not changed.No cost estimate is available yet.Opening of this bridge is set for early April.Officials still hope the damaged I-beam can be repaired by constructing a permanent splice to reconnect the damaged section.Before that can be done crews must first realign the bisected segment by deploying 8 temporary towers and hydraulic jacks to return the span to its original position.The construction contractors include Allied Painting Inc.,Cornell and Company Inc.,Moretrench American Corp. and PKF Mark III.I have the article if anybody needs to know anything.

Posted February 9, 2017, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Maria: Its actually the county you would most likely need to contact, as it appears to be a county-owned bridge.

Posted February 9, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hi Maria:

I would recommend contacting the city about this matter. Those of us who contribute to Bridgehunter like to see bridges maintained, including lighting, but having no ownership of this bridge, we have no say in its maintenance.

Good luck with this. Feel free to reference this website in your quest to have the problem fixed.

Robert

Posted February 9, 2017, by Maria Elena (meem06 [at] aol [dot] com)

Please Please have the light bulbs in those beautiful light fixtures replaced! I go over this bridge everyday to & from work..and its so sad to see this bridge looking so absolutly neglected..Bulbs have been out for months now.And some of the light fixtures are broken..it is really falling in to disrepair & needs to be addressed asap.. Its dark & depressing while going over it!!!

I will send photos if needed...

Thank you very much for your prompt attention to this matter.

A taxpayer of ventnor....

Posted February 9, 2017, by Maria Elena (meem06 [at] aol [dot] com)

Please Please have the light bulbs in those beautiful light fixtures replaced! I go over this bridge everyday to & from work..and its so sad to see this bridge looking so absolutly neglected..Bulbs have been out for months now.And some of the light fixtures are broken..it is really falling in to disrepair & needs to be addressed asap.. Its dark & depressing while going over it!!!

I will send photos if needed...

Thank you very much for your prompt attention to this matter.

A taxpayer of ventnor....

Posted February 4, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Got some more information on this bridge.As per an article printed in the Reading Eagle on 2-4-17 this bridge will remain closed for at least 8 more weeks through early April.The Pa Turnpike Commission and the N.J. Transportation Authority who are joint owners of the bridge said an April reopening represents a best-case scenario,provided a more complex partial reconstruction or even replacement of the entire structure is not necessary.I have seen the pictures of this fracture and it did not look good.When i find out through the media what is going to happen with the repair or possible replacement i will let everyone know.

Posted January 24, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I have more information on this bridge.As per an article in the Reading Eagle on 1-24-17 engineers will need at least 2 weeks to get a handle on the repairs needed to fix this bridge.One of the support beams fractured cleanly into 2 pieces-a highly unusual event which had some experts suspecting a flawed,6 decade old weld.This bridge was closed indefinitely after workers discovered the broken steel truss last week.Photos posted on the Pa Turnpike Commission website showed a massive I-beam under the bridge's westbound lanes sheared in half.Officials believe the 14 inch truss failed recently and suddenly.Scientists at Lehigh University are analyzing a piece of the fractured beam to help determine the cause of the failure.In addition to holes that were mistakenly drilled into the beams during construction and filled with plug welds along with wear and tear on the steel,experts are also looking at possible flaws in materials or design.Work is underway to stabilize the bridge which sunk slightly.Crews have installed steel plates to brace the fractured beam and will jack the bridge back to its original position.The bridge will rest on 8 temporary towers.The daily traffic count according to the Reading Eagle article is actually 42,000 i'm guessing as of 2016.I will post any more information i get on this bridge.

Posted January 22, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Dana and Kay,in answer to your statement it doesn't seem like a lot of traffic crosses this bridge every day which leads me to believe there might not be major traffic backups.Anyway,according to an article printed in the Reading Eagle on 1-22-17 this bridge will be closed until engineers can come up with a repair plan.Work is being done to stabilize the bridge which includes adding new plates to reconnect the fractured truss piece spotted Friday below the westbound right lane's riding surface.Authorities said a comprehensive analysis must be done to better understand what impact the fracture has had on the bridge which will take 2 weeks.Until more is understood about the damage no estimate is possible about when a permanent repair can be made to allow reopening the bridge.According to a turnpike commissioner this fracture happened quickly due to changing weather conditions.A sample of the fracture has been taken for forensic analysis.The bridge will be under constant watch and monitored around the clock using a high definition video survey.As i mentioned in my earlier post detours will be in effect and to prepare for slow moving or stopped traffic especially during the afternoon and evening hours.I will keep everyone posted if and when i get more information.

Posted January 21, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Doesn't look like a lot of crossings, must make for traffic back ups!

Posted January 21, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

As per an article printed in the Reading Eagle on 1-21-17 a fracture was discovered in the truss on the Pa side during an inspection while the bridge was being repainted.This caused the Pa Turnpike Commission to close the bridge for today while engineers are inspecting the bridge.The bridge cannot reopen until repairs are made.Detours are in effect while the repair is being done.The location of the fracture was not revealed in the article.

Posted January 19, 2017, by Luke

Looks like the predecessor to the Victory Bridge.

Posted January 11, 2017, by Douglas Butler

It seems like most of or all the Strauss bascule bridges are becoming obsolete now what they're do with the swing girder span next to it?

Posted December 30, 2016, by Matt Lohry

After looking at the Google Earth Street View, this is the correct bridge shown in the photos, and the line is most definitely abandoned, per the satellite view. It is possible that the pony plate span was refurbished shortly prior to its closure, making it appear to be newer.

Posted December 30, 2016, by t uhl (tthornton [dot] uhl [at] gmx [dot] com)

Hi--I believe this is the active line to SI (M&E/SIRT). If you look closely at the photo you can see that the bridge (not the trestle) is quite new.

Posted December 29, 2016, by Randall Riccardo (randall_riccardo [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Probably the most important bridge from the past 500 years.

Posted December 19, 2016, by DjFlem (djflem2 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Source: NJ Historic Bridge Survey (1995)

(http://www.state.nj.us/transportation/works/environment/pdf/...) Plaque

Builder: F. W.Schwiers, Jr. Company (NYC)

Design: Double Leaf Bascule (orginal)

Material:Steel

Spans: 3

Length: 307 ft

Width: 30 ft

Owner: Passaic County

NRHP eligible: No

1930 (original), 1977(fixed), 2002 (reconstruct)

Posted December 19, 2016, by DJ Flem (djflem2 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Market Street Bridge aka 2nd Street Bridge

Passaic & Wallington

NBI 1600003

coord:40.860|-74.116

1930 built

1977 fixed closed position

2002 reconstructed lift removed

Posted December 18, 2016, by DJ Flem (djflem2 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

The drawing appears to be the Market Street Bridge (2nd Street Bridge) in Passaic and Wallington, yet the geocoords show it to the Market Street Bridge in Paterson and Elmwood Park.

Posted November 15, 2016, by Ray Cathcart (bridgehunter [at] cathcart [dot] us)

This bridge actually collapsed in 1999 onto some safety beams that were set up due to its similarity to the failed Mianus River Bridge in Connecticut. The repair took about 7 weeks.

Posted October 23, 2016, by dave (cdstiles [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge has not opened in almost 50 years that I can remember...The Operators control booth was on the State Street Bridge right next to this bridge. The State Street bridge was a similar type of drawbridge that occasionally opened to allow barges heading up the Woodbridge river. The State Street Bridge was replaced by a cement non movable bridge around the late 1980's

Trenton Bridge (New Jersey)
Posted September 30, 2016, by Will Truax (Bridgewright [at] gmail [dot] com)
Trenton Bridge (New Jersey)
Posted September 27, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The early tied arch bridges were massive and indeed usually kinda odd looking. The lack of a straight upper chord led to some very creative ways to roof the structure. And from what I have read they were a nightmare to dismantle.

Trenton Bridge (New Jersey)
Posted September 27, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

It was probably one of the earliest substantial use of iron in an American bridge... and most certainly an oddball bridge to be sure...

Posted July 22, 2016, by Luke

IMO, the current rail line should be the one listed if the bridge has no official or common nickname.

After looking at the article the imagery came from again, the bridge is referred to in the article as the "Glenmoore Bridge", so perhaps we should call it a day and just name it "Glenmoore Railroad Bridge"...

Posted July 22, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] cfom)

Luke,

Not so much for this bridge but most people that I know locally, refer to the rail line as the old Reading line.

This may be more of an issue back east than it is in the mid-west. We had all sorts of railroads. Then, everything went Amtrak/Conrail now we see all sorts of stuff, including UP on the old Reading line. While the Northeast Corridor was originally Camden and Amboy then PRR it now has Amtrak, Conrail (yes, it still seems to exist) NJ Transit, Septa and possibly NS and CSX running on the same rails. To me, considering the history of the NE Corridor, in my mind the connection is to the PRR, not Amtrak, who technically owns the line. Also having the RR name first complicates the search.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted July 22, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Luke,

Most people around here that I know still refer to this rail line as the Reading line. I guess if this is the way the site wishes to handle it, I'll go along with it but it seems to go against the whole 'historic' thing.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted July 22, 2016, by Luke ( )

Yes, but given the fact there hasn't been a successful railroad merger in some time* that won't be too much of an issue.

(*Not to mention the fact that the most recent attempt at a merger was admonished by multiple politicians, including the justice department.)

Posted July 22, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Luke,

I understand keeping the two sections as one bridge. However, the CSX thing confuses me. Does this mean the bridge's name changes with each railroad merger?

Regards,

Art S.

Posted July 22, 2016, by Luke

The abutment for the DPG is built into the arch segment, so I'd consider the DPG to be a part of the same structure.

Also, railroad names are as relevant/pertinent as highway names are in the title.

Posted July 22, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Do we define the deck plate girder bridge over the roadway as a separate bridge or part of the same bridge?

Posted July 22, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

To give others a sense of what's going on, think about taking a little county bridge with poor sight lines that should be OK for 100 cars a day then ty to force thousands of cars a day across it!

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/20/nyregion/new-jersey-roads-...

New Jersey Drivers Fume as Road and Bridge Work Stops

By PATRICK McGEEHAN and EMMA G. FITZSIMMONS JULY 19, 2016

Photo

Stalled bridge construction near Princeton, N.J., on Route 518. Construction began in early July but Gov. Chris Christie, at impasse with lawmakers on a gasoline-tax increase, stopped road work around the state.

Credit Fred R. Conrad for The New York Times

Several miles from Princeton, drivers are playing chicken as they detour across a single-lane bridge. In Summit, the prolonged shutdown of a century-old crossing has forced nearby businesses to lay off workers. And in Hoboken, the delay of the long-awaited rehabilitation of a critical connection to the Lincoln Tunnel threatens to disrupt back-to-school traffic.

Across New Jersey, residents accustomed to complaining about all of the road work undertaken during the summer months now have something different to moan about: Hundreds of those improvement projects have ground to a halt, victims of a political stalemate among state lawmakers. In many places, the orange cones and mesh netting are still in place, but the backhoes and road graders sit idle, as do more than 1,000 construction workers across the state.

The long days and abundant sunshine of the season make it prime time for fixing the roads and bridges that keep things moving in New Jersey, which, like many states, is saddled with aging infrastructure. But for more than a week, those ideal conditions have been squandered as the state’s political leaders argue about whether and how to raise the state’s gasoline tax.

With no agreement and the state’s Transportation Trust Fund — which is financed by the tax — nearly drained, Gov. Chris Christie ordered that all work stop on a long list of projects throughout the state. That left the completion of construction scheduled for this year in jeopardy, said Anthony Attanasio, executive director of the Utility and Transportation Contractors Association of New Jersey.

“One thing everyone agrees on is that government is responsible for providing safe and reliable infrastructure for taxpayers,” Mr. Attanasio said. But, he added, since Mr. Christie’s executive order took effect on July 8, “we’re in this weird limbo where no work’s getting done.”

With Mr. Christie and other Republican leaders at their party’s national convention in Cleveland this week, a deal to end the stalemate is unlikely in the coming days. The chances of reaching one before the Democrats wrap up their convention in Philadelphia late next week seem nearly as slim.

Photo

Gov. Chris Christie, left, at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland.

Credit Eric Thayer for The New York Times

The 50-page list of stalled transportation work represents more than $3 billion in projects to upgrade roads, bridges and mass transit. New Jersey Transit, the agency that runs the state’s commuter rail and bus network, has had to suspend its order for dozens of new buses until the financing issue is sorted out.

Continue reading the main story

James Kennelly, a spokesman for Hudson County, said officials there had been advised to expect the suspension of work on the Park Avenue Bridge, which connects Hoboken and Weehawken, to extend to the end of July.

What is clear is that shutting down and restarting projects will add to their cost, driving up the total price significantly in some cases. Hudson County, Mr. Kennelly said, estimates the stoppage will add as much as $120,000 to the cost of rehabilitating the bridge.

In several towns on the northern border of Princeton, the closing of the Route 518 bridge this month — and the subsequent shutdown of work two days later — has sent cars onto other traffic-clogged routes over the Millstone River, leading to angry exchanges among drivers. The work was scheduled to be finished this fall. Now the bridge could be closed much longer.

Donato Nieman, the administrator in Montgomery Township, said he had seen drivers getting into arguments when they were rerouted to a one-lane bridge to the north. Some drivers have even played chicken on the bridge, facing each other until someone backs down, he said.

“You get the rolling down of windows and the hurling of less-than-charming language,” Mr. Nieman said, noting that officers were sent to park in driveways nearby in an effort to encourage drivers to behave.

The police in nearby Franklin Township, in Somerset County, have received complaints about road rage shouting matches at another crossing to the south. Sgt. Philip Rizzo, a spokesman for the Police Department, said the community had seen major traffic backups, especially during the evening commute.

Document: New Jersey Town Asks State to Deem Bridge Project Essential

Local leaders have asked the state to deem the Route 518 bridge an essential project and to restart the work since it is a critical route for emergency responders trying to reach a hospital. Theodore Chase, the deputy mayor in Franklin Township, questioned why work began on the bridge on July 6, even as uncertainty lingered over state funding.

His wife, Victory Chase, was stuck in traffic at an alternate crossing as she returned home on a recent evening after volunteering at a library.

“It took me an hour to do something that takes less than 10 minutes normally,” Ms. Chase said.

Stephen Schapiro, a spokesman for the state’s Transportation Department, said officials had developed the detour with local communities before the project began and that the Route 518 bridge would have been closed this week even if a shutdown had not been ordered. Since work on the bridge had already started, it was no longer safe for traffic, Mr. Schapiro said.

Down the block from the Route 518 crossing, Barry M. Gerlack, the owner of a travel business, said he was furious with Mr. Christie over the impasse. Not only is his commuting longer, but a pizza deliveryman recently called him frantically asking for detour directions in the hopes of keeping a pie hot.

“We have our own Bridgegate here — it’s unbelievable,” he said.

A deal over transportation financing appeared near last month, but Mr. Christie and Democratic leaders in the State Senate could not agree over which tax cuts to pair with a 23-cent increase in the gas tax. On Monday, Mr. Christie told reporters in Cleveland that he had rejected a new financing proposal from Stephen M. Sweeney, a Democrat and president of the State Senate, and would meet with Mr. Sweeney after the convention. Mr. Sweeney’s office said that Mr. Christie had not offered his own counterproposal.

Since Mr. Christie ordered the shutdown, he has been preoccupied with a series of political setbacks. Last week, David Samson, his longtime friend, pleaded guilty to using his position as chairman of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey for his personal benefit. A day later, Mr. Christie was passed over to serve as Donald J. Trump’s running mate.

At the Morris Avenue bridge in Summit, residents complained of rerouted traffic filling quiet neighborhoods with the sounds of revving engines and honking horns. On Monday afternoon, a group of teenagers walked down the sidewalk as they sought a way around the closed bridge.

Photo

An idle bridge repair site. Officials are complaining that time is running out to finish many jobs before schools open. Credit Fred R. Conrad for The New York Times

Jim Jorgensen, 50, a financial analyst who lives in Summit, walked past the idle construction site.

“How long does it take to build a bridge?” he asked.

The project in Hoboken had been underway for just two days when Mr. Christie ordered the shutdown, Mr. Kennelly, the Hoboken spokesman, said. Workers had begun chipping away at the old concrete on the bridge, one of two that connect Hoboken and Weehawken just south of the Lincoln Tunnel.

“Our main concern was that we found ourselves in a tricky position because it is very difficult to get in and out of Hoboken,” Mr. Kennelly said. “We wanted to try to manage things so that we didn’t increase any period of time of aggravation.”

County officials asked the contractors to cover up the work its crew had done and reopen the lane of traffic that had been closed off, Mr. Kennelly said. Before the suspension of the work, the plan had been to have crews work for 12 hours a day six days a week through mid-September.

Under that schedule, the project could have been completed without much nighttime labor and before school buses start rolling again in the fall, Mr. Kennelly said. But now that plan will have to be reworked with the understanding that it will extend well past the end of summer.

Construction industry officials, Mr. Attanasio said, still hope that elected officials can work out a solution before the end of the month. If not, he said, the stalemate could grow into a more dire condition.

“If you get into August, you’d be going from hundreds of projects to thousands of projects” shut down, he said. “That’s going to affect every single person in New Jersey and anyone who travels through our state and anyone who ships goods and services to and from our state.”

Nate Schweber contributed reporting.

A version of this article appears in print on July 20, 2016, on page A1 of the New York edition with the headline: Anger as Work Stops on Roads in New Jersey. Order Reprints| Today's Paper|Subscribe

Posted July 22, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/20/nyregion/new-jersey-roads-...

New Jersey Drivers Fume as Road and Bridge Work Stops

By PATRICK McGEEHAN and EMMA G. FITZSIMMONS JULY 19, 2016

Photo

Stalled bridge construction near Princeton, N.J., on Route 518. Construction began in early July but Gov. Chris Christie, at impasse with lawmakers on a gasoline-tax increase, stopped road work around the state.

Credit Fred R. Conrad for The New York Times

Several miles from Princeton, drivers are playing chicken as they detour across a single-lane bridge. In Summit, the prolonged shutdown of a century-old crossing has forced nearby businesses to lay off workers. And in Hoboken, the delay of the long-awaited rehabilitation of a critical connection to the Lincoln Tunnel threatens to disrupt back-to-school traffic.

Across New Jersey, residents accustomed to complaining about all of the road work undertaken during the summer months now have something different to moan about: Hundreds of those improvement projects have ground to a halt, victims of a political stalemate among state lawmakers. In many places, the orange cones and mesh netting are still in place, but the backhoes and road graders sit idle, as do more than 1,000 construction workers across the state.

The long days and abundant sunshine of the season make it prime time for fixing the roads and bridges that keep things moving in New Jersey, which, like many states, is saddled with aging infrastructure. But for more than a week, those ideal conditions have been squandered as the state’s political leaders argue about whether and how to raise the state’s gasoline tax.

With no agreement and the state’s Transportation Trust Fund — which is financed by the tax — nearly drained, Gov. Chris Christie ordered that all work stop on a long list of projects throughout the state. That left the completion of construction scheduled for this year in jeopardy, said Anthony Attanasio, executive director of the Utility and Transportation Contractors Association of New Jersey.

“One thing everyone agrees on is that government is responsible for providing safe and reliable infrastructure for taxpayers,” Mr. Attanasio said. But, he added, since Mr. Christie’s executive order took effect on July 8, “we’re in this weird limbo where no work’s getting done.”

With Mr. Christie and other Republican leaders at their party’s national convention in Cleveland this week, a deal to end the stalemate is unlikely in the coming days. The chances of reaching one before the Democrats wrap up their convention in Philadelphia late next week seem nearly as slim.

Photo

Gov. Chris Christie, left, at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland.

Credit Eric Thayer for The New York Times

The 50-page list of stalled transportation work represents more than $3 billion in projects to upgrade roads, bridges and mass transit. New Jersey Transit, the agency that runs the state’s commuter rail and bus network, has had to suspend its order for dozens of new buses until the financing issue is sorted out.

Continue reading the main story

James Kennelly, a spokesman for Hudson County, said officials there had been advised to expect the suspension of work on the Park Avenue Bridge, which connects Hoboken and Weehawken, to extend to the end of July.

What is clear is that shutting down and restarting projects will add to their cost, driving up the total price significantly in some cases. Hudson County, Mr. Kennelly said, estimates the stoppage will add as much as $120,000 to the cost of rehabilitating the bridge.

In several towns on the northern border of Princeton, the closing of the Route 518 bridge this month — and the subsequent shutdown of work two days later — has sent cars onto other traffic-clogged routes over the Millstone River, leading to angry exchanges among drivers. The work was scheduled to be finished this fall. Now the bridge could be closed much longer.

Donato Nieman, the administrator in Montgomery Township, said he had seen drivers getting into arguments when they were rerouted to a one-lane bridge to the north. Some drivers have even played chicken on the bridge, facing each other until someone backs down, he said.

“You get the rolling down of windows and the hurling of less-than-charming language,” Mr. Nieman said, noting that officers were sent to park in driveways nearby in an effort to encourage drivers to behave.

The police in nearby Franklin Township, in Somerset County, have received complaints about road rage shouting matches at another crossing to the south. Sgt. Philip Rizzo, a spokesman for the Police Department, said the community had seen major traffic backups, especially during the evening commute.

Document: New Jersey Town Asks State to Deem Bridge Project Essential

Local leaders have asked the state to deem the Route 518 bridge an essential project and to restart the work since it is a critical route for emergency responders trying to reach a hospital. Theodore Chase, the deputy mayor in Franklin Township, questioned why work began on the bridge on July 6, even as uncertainty lingered over state funding.

His wife, Victory Chase, was stuck in traffic at an alternate crossing as she returned home on a recent evening after volunteering at a library.

“It took me an hour to do something that takes less than 10 minutes normally,” Ms. Chase said.

Stephen Schapiro, a spokesman for the state’s Transportation Department, said officials had developed the detour with local communities before the project began and that the Route 518 bridge would have been closed this week even if a shutdown had not been ordered. Since work on the bridge had already started, it was no longer safe for traffic, Mr. Schapiro said.

Down the block from the Route 518 crossing, Barry M. Gerlack, the owner of a travel business, said he was furious with Mr. Christie over the impasse. Not only is his commuting longer, but a pizza deliveryman recently called him frantically asking for detour directions in the hopes of keeping a pie hot.

“We have our own Bridgegate here — it’s unbelievable,” he said.

A deal over transportation financing appeared near last month, but Mr. Christie and Democratic leaders in the State Senate could not agree over which tax cuts to pair with a 23-cent increase in the gas tax. On Monday, Mr. Christie told reporters in Cleveland that he had rejected a new financing proposal from Stephen M. Sweeney, a Democrat and president of the State Senate, and would meet with Mr. Sweeney after the convention. Mr. Sweeney’s office said that Mr. Christie had not offered his own counterproposal.

Since Mr. Christie ordered the shutdown, he has been preoccupied with a series of political setbacks. Last week, David Samson, his longtime friend, pleaded guilty to using his position as chairman of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey for his personal benefit. A day later, Mr. Christie was passed over to serve as Donald J. Trump’s running mate.

At the Morris Avenue bridge in Summit, residents complained of rerouted traffic filling quiet neighborhoods with the sounds of revving engines and honking horns. On Monday afternoon, a group of teenagers walked down the sidewalk as they sought a way around the closed bridge.

Photo

An idle bridge repair site. Officials are complaining that time is running out to finish many jobs before schools open. Credit Fred R. Conrad for The New York Times

Jim Jorgensen, 50, a financial analyst who lives in Summit, walked past the idle construction site.

“How long does it take to build a bridge?” he asked.

The project in Hoboken had been underway for just two days when Mr. Christie ordered the shutdown, Mr. Kennelly, the Hoboken spokesman, said. Workers had begun chipping away at the old concrete on the bridge, one of two that connect Hoboken and Weehawken just south of the Lincoln Tunnel.

“Our main concern was that we found ourselves in a tricky position because it is very difficult to get in and out of Hoboken,” Mr. Kennelly said. “We wanted to try to manage things so that we didn’t increase any period of time of aggravation.”

County officials asked the contractors to cover up the work its crew had done and reopen the lane of traffic that had been closed off, Mr. Kennelly said. Before the suspension of the work, the plan had been to have crews work for 12 hours a day six days a week through mid-September.

Under that schedule, the project could have been completed without much nighttime labor and before school buses start rolling again in the fall, Mr. Kennelly said. But now that plan will have to be reworked with the understanding that it will extend well past the end of summer.

Construction industry officials, Mr. Attanasio said, still hope that elected officials can work out a solution before the end of the month. If not, he said, the stalemate could grow into a more dire condition.

“If you get into August, you’d be going from hundreds of projects to thousands of projects” shut down, he said. “That’s going to affect every single person in New Jersey and anyone who travels through our state and anyone who ships goods and services to and from our state.”

Nate Schweber contributed reporting.

A version of this article appears in print on July 20, 2016, on page A1 of the New York edition with the headline: Anger as Work Stops on Roads in New Jersey. Order Reprints| Today's Paper|Subscribe

Posted July 22, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

http://www.franklintwpnj.org/Home/Components/News/News/3184/...

Update on Rt. 518

Post Date:07/20/2016 4:00 PM

The NJDOT has completed adjustment of traffic signal timing on Route 27 in the Kingston area. These changes were made to help traffic flow due to the increased volume resulting from the closure of the Route 518 Bridge over the D&R Canal. There are still delays during the AM & PM rush hours, but we have seen some improvement with the signal timing changes. The Griggstown Causeway continues to be a location with significant delays during the rush hours and motorists are advised to avoid that area if at all possible. We are aware of the inconvenience and frustration caused by the bridge closure and will continue to work with NJDOT and County officials to mitigate the impacts as much as possible.

Posted July 22, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Matt,

You are probably correct. However, its a multi-span pony that literally ends at a T intersection with relatively heavy traffic and poor sightlines. To me, this is the worst kind of compromise, an 'in-kind' replacement that really provides no benefit over the prior structure while eliminating the actual historic artifact.

Its shortcomings have really come to a head as the next crossing (Rt. 518) a relatively major route was closed for repair of the canal bridge (adjacent to the river) and, due to NJ politics, is now closed indefinitely as all state DOT work has stopped due to a political pissing contest.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted July 21, 2016, by Matt Lohry

I found it rather odd as well that they chose to build a one-lane bridge here...I would guess that the reason is to limit the traffic flow, and to make it inconvenient enough to force the majority of people to take alternate routes to somewhat protect this area, as it appears that it might have some environmental importance to it. Hardly seems worth it, though, with all of the problems that it seems to be causing...

Posted July 21, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

I crossed that bridge yesterday. I don't know why they kept it as a one lane bridge when they replaced it. Seems kind of pointless of killing a historic bridge only to install a duplicate replacement. That said, even with a four lane bridge, the intersection would still suck.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted July 21, 2016, by DSue

This bridge is not safe for today's traffic. There is no need in 2016 for a one lane pony truss. It is not even the original bridge so therefore, it's not historic.

I have witnessed so many scary things happen. Two people trying to cross at once, cars backing up onto River road and almost getting hit by other cars passing when there is clearly a sign that says no passing. I have witnessed multiple fights, verbal AND physical. I have sat in line for over 10 minutes once because two cars stuck on it head one couldn't back off because all the cars behind them went too.

This is a heavy traffic area. It needs a two lane bridge!

Posted July 21, 2016, by DSue (donnarich734 [at] msn [dot] com)

This bridge is not safe for today's traffic. There is no need in 2016 for a one lane pony truss. It is not even the original bridge so therefore, it's not historic.

I have witnessed so many scary things happen. Two people trying to cross at once, cars backing up onto River road and almost getting hit by other cars passing when there is clearly a sign that says no passing. I have witnessed multiple fights, verbal AND physical. I have sat in line for over 10 minutes once because two cars stuck on it head one couldn't back off because all the cars behind them went too.

This is a heavy traffic area. It needs a two lane bridge!

Posted July 10, 2016, by David Caputo (davidacaputo [at] msn [dot] com)

I am a life long resident of Point Pleasant and I have fond memories of the old route 88 bridge. I heard that the bridge was sold and it is somewhere in Texas. Is this true, and where is it now?

Thank You,

David Caputo

Posted May 6, 2016, by Rhoda (Vwgal16 [at] comcast [dot] net)

I have lived in Montgomery township for over 10 years. The Giggstown Causeway Bridge needs to be evaluated for safety. It has heavy traffic and is only a one lane bridge, while others in area are 2 lanes. Due to the location of bridge it is a dangerous bridge and area. Though many need the bridge to cross over from middlesex county into somerset county.

What are the steps for the bridge to become considered a 2 lane bridge.

Posted May 5, 2016, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

It is the longest span of its type in the United States, however, it is the fourth longest span in the world, with the longest cantilever truss span in the world being the famous Quebec Bridge http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=qu...

Posted May 5, 2016, by Andrew B (anti3 [at] aol [dot] com)

This bridge was built while I was in High School (Nether Providence). I recall it was the longest span of its type when built. I also (think) I recall there were some structural issues originally and that for many years there were cables installed to stabilize the trusses, I could be wrong about that, as I don't see the cables in any photo. I was always a little sad to see the Chester-Bridgeport Ferry go away when the bridge was opened. We used to take the ferry (and later the bridge) to the NJ shore. I personally enjoyed the ferry trip...Dad never did. The bridge was an occasional Friday trip to NJ in my HS days for...umm...refreshments that I could not purchase (legally) in PA:)

Trenton Bridge (New Jersey)
Posted April 4, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

So Nathan,

This one is a bit or a conundrum, it's a wood covered bridge but it has a unique design that is essentially a bowstring with wood compression and iron tension members. Is this the long lost missing link or is it an abomination? :^)

Regards,

Art S.

Posted March 29, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Thanks Luke,

The stringer always struck me as a weird addition but I guess it was always needed for the road/interurban line.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted March 24, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)