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Bassetts Bridge (New Jersey)
Posted April 28, 2017, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted April 24, 2017, by Loretta Killian (KillianLoretta [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I see this is listed as still actually used!! Wow!! It is beautiful!!

Thanks for using my pix of it. It is a fav subject of mine. I need to get over there again and photograph it.

I read in a CNJ history that the line was completed to Phillipsburg in 1852 so this bridge was probably built about 1850--52!! You just can't beat that craftsmanship!! Very few of the bricks have fallen out over like 165 years of heavy locomotives and carloads of coal and everything else. Truly amazing. I found it accidentally while driving the older alignments of Old US 22/Easton Turnpike/New Brunswick Turnpike.

Posted March 10, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

As per an article printed in the Reading Eagle on 3-10-17 this bridge re-opened late Thursday after being closed for almost 2 months.The fractured I-beam has been repaired and tests have been run on the bridge which showed the bridge can handle the traffic.

Posted March 6, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

As per an article printed in the Reading Eagle on 3-4-17 this bridge is on track to open in about a month according to engineers overseeing the repairs.No definite cause has been nailed down yet but there are plenty of guesses including the weather,plugs welds and even traffic.When the bridge reopens and the authorities do find a definite cause i will gladly put it on this site.

Iron Bridge (New Jersey)
Posted February 26, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The Lattice inside the Arch would suggest Mosely, it's definitely not a Reznor.

Iron Bridge (New Jersey)
Posted February 26, 2017, by Michael Quiet (mquiet [at] gmail [dot] com)

Art,

I wasn't actually familiar with those designs...its kinda amazing how many unique designs for bowstrings occurred. Even Mosley did a few different models aside from the Hares Hill bridge:

http://bridgehunter.com/vt/bennington/mosley/

http://bridgehunter.com/nh/sullivan/bh49549/

It looked to me like the arch was a T section like the Hares Hill one, hence my leaning with that. Irregardless, its tough doing precision identification based off old postcards :P

Iron Bridge (New Jersey)
Posted February 25, 2017, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Michael,

I take back my previous comment. I didn't realize Hares Hill was a Moseley design. I think it's arch design doesn't match but the lattice does.

Regards,

Art S.

Iron Bridge (New Jersey)
Posted February 25, 2017, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Michael,

To me it's either a Henszey like this one:

https://bridgehunter.com/pa/lancaster/conestoga-creek/

Or a Rezner / Ohio Bridge Co. Like this one:

https://bridgehunter.com/ny/dutchess/tioronda/

I'm now leaning towards Henszey as I think the arch cross-section is the same. Moseley has a simpler triangular cross-section so, to me a less likely candidate.

Regards,

Art S.

Iron Bridge (New Jersey)
Posted February 25, 2017, by Michael Quiet (mquiet [at] gmail [dot] com)

This looks like it might be a small Mosley Lattice bowstring/arch. Compare with the last remaining example:

http://bridgehunter.com/pa/chester/hares-hill/

Posted February 20, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Here is the latest on this bridge as per an article printed in the Reading Eagle on 2-18-17.Contractors have been named to do the work on this bridge.The plans to repair this bridge have not changed.No cost estimate is available yet.Opening of this bridge is set for early April.Officials still hope the damaged I-beam can be repaired by constructing a permanent splice to reconnect the damaged section.Before that can be done crews must first realign the bisected segment by deploying 8 temporary towers and hydraulic jacks to return the span to its original position.The construction contractors include Allied Painting Inc.,Cornell and Company Inc.,Moretrench American Corp. and PKF Mark III.I have the article if anybody needs to know anything.

Posted February 9, 2017, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Maria: Its actually the county you would most likely need to contact, as it appears to be a county-owned bridge.

Posted February 9, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hi Maria:

I would recommend contacting the city about this matter. Those of us who contribute to Bridgehunter like to see bridges maintained, including lighting, but having no ownership of this bridge, we have no say in its maintenance.

Good luck with this. Feel free to reference this website in your quest to have the problem fixed.

Robert

Posted February 9, 2017, by Maria Elena (meem06 [at] aol [dot] com)

Please Please have the light bulbs in those beautiful light fixtures replaced! I go over this bridge everyday to & from work..and its so sad to see this bridge looking so absolutly neglected..Bulbs have been out for months now.And some of the light fixtures are broken..it is really falling in to disrepair & needs to be addressed asap.. Its dark & depressing while going over it!!!

I will send photos if needed...

Thank you very much for your prompt attention to this matter.

A taxpayer of ventnor....

Posted February 9, 2017, by Maria Elena (meem06 [at] aol [dot] com)

Please Please have the light bulbs in those beautiful light fixtures replaced! I go over this bridge everyday to & from work..and its so sad to see this bridge looking so absolutly neglected..Bulbs have been out for months now.And some of the light fixtures are broken..it is really falling in to disrepair & needs to be addressed asap.. Its dark & depressing while going over it!!!

I will send photos if needed...

Thank you very much for your prompt attention to this matter.

A taxpayer of ventnor....

Posted February 4, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Got some more information on this bridge.As per an article printed in the Reading Eagle on 2-4-17 this bridge will remain closed for at least 8 more weeks through early April.The Pa Turnpike Commission and the N.J. Transportation Authority who are joint owners of the bridge said an April reopening represents a best-case scenario,provided a more complex partial reconstruction or even replacement of the entire structure is not necessary.I have seen the pictures of this fracture and it did not look good.When i find out through the media what is going to happen with the repair or possible replacement i will let everyone know.

Posted January 24, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I have more information on this bridge.As per an article in the Reading Eagle on 1-24-17 engineers will need at least 2 weeks to get a handle on the repairs needed to fix this bridge.One of the support beams fractured cleanly into 2 pieces-a highly unusual event which had some experts suspecting a flawed,6 decade old weld.This bridge was closed indefinitely after workers discovered the broken steel truss last week.Photos posted on the Pa Turnpike Commission website showed a massive I-beam under the bridge's westbound lanes sheared in half.Officials believe the 14 inch truss failed recently and suddenly.Scientists at Lehigh University are analyzing a piece of the fractured beam to help determine the cause of the failure.In addition to holes that were mistakenly drilled into the beams during construction and filled with plug welds along with wear and tear on the steel,experts are also looking at possible flaws in materials or design.Work is underway to stabilize the bridge which sunk slightly.Crews have installed steel plates to brace the fractured beam and will jack the bridge back to its original position.The bridge will rest on 8 temporary towers.The daily traffic count according to the Reading Eagle article is actually 42,000 i'm guessing as of 2016.I will post any more information i get on this bridge.

Posted January 22, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Dana and Kay,in answer to your statement it doesn't seem like a lot of traffic crosses this bridge every day which leads me to believe there might not be major traffic backups.Anyway,according to an article printed in the Reading Eagle on 1-22-17 this bridge will be closed until engineers can come up with a repair plan.Work is being done to stabilize the bridge which includes adding new plates to reconnect the fractured truss piece spotted Friday below the westbound right lane's riding surface.Authorities said a comprehensive analysis must be done to better understand what impact the fracture has had on the bridge which will take 2 weeks.Until more is understood about the damage no estimate is possible about when a permanent repair can be made to allow reopening the bridge.According to a turnpike commissioner this fracture happened quickly due to changing weather conditions.A sample of the fracture has been taken for forensic analysis.The bridge will be under constant watch and monitored around the clock using a high definition video survey.As i mentioned in my earlier post detours will be in effect and to prepare for slow moving or stopped traffic especially during the afternoon and evening hours.I will keep everyone posted if and when i get more information.

Posted January 21, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Doesn't look like a lot of crossings, must make for traffic back ups!

Posted January 21, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

As per an article printed in the Reading Eagle on 1-21-17 a fracture was discovered in the truss on the Pa side during an inspection while the bridge was being repainted.This caused the Pa Turnpike Commission to close the bridge for today while engineers are inspecting the bridge.The bridge cannot reopen until repairs are made.Detours are in effect while the repair is being done.The location of the fracture was not revealed in the article.

Posted January 19, 2017, by Luke

Looks like the predecessor to the Victory Bridge.

Posted January 11, 2017, by Douglas Butler

It seems like most of or all the Strauss bascule bridges are becoming obsolete now what they're do with the swing girder span next to it?

Posted December 30, 2016, by Matt Lohry

After looking at the Google Earth Street View, this is the correct bridge shown in the photos, and the line is most definitely abandoned, per the satellite view. It is possible that the pony plate span was refurbished shortly prior to its closure, making it appear to be newer.

Posted December 30, 2016, by t uhl (tthornton [dot] uhl [at] gmx [dot] com)

Hi--I believe this is the active line to SI (M&E/SIRT). If you look closely at the photo you can see that the bridge (not the trestle) is quite new.

Posted December 29, 2016, by Randall Riccardo (randall_riccardo [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Probably the most important bridge from the past 500 years.

Posted December 19, 2016, by DjFlem (djflem2 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Source: NJ Historic Bridge Survey (1995)

(http://www.state.nj.us/transportation/works/environment/pdf/...) Plaque

Builder: F. W.Schwiers, Jr. Company (NYC)

Design: Double Leaf Bascule (orginal)

Material:Steel

Spans: 3

Length: 307 ft

Width: 30 ft

Owner: Passaic County

NRHP eligible: No

1930 (original), 1977(fixed), 2002 (reconstruct)

Posted December 19, 2016, by DJ Flem (djflem2 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Market Street Bridge aka 2nd Street Bridge

Passaic & Wallington

NBI 1600003

coord:40.860|-74.116

1930 built

1977 fixed closed position

2002 reconstructed lift removed

Posted December 18, 2016, by DJ Flem (djflem2 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

The drawing appears to be the Market Street Bridge (2nd Street Bridge) in Passaic and Wallington, yet the geocoords show it to the Market Street Bridge in Paterson and Elmwood Park.

Posted November 15, 2016, by Ray Cathcart (bridgehunter [at] cathcart [dot] us)

This bridge actually collapsed in 1999 onto some safety beams that were set up due to its similarity to the failed Mianus River Bridge in Connecticut. The repair took about 7 weeks.

Posted October 23, 2016, by dave (cdstiles [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge has not opened in almost 50 years that I can remember...The Operators control booth was on the State Street Bridge right next to this bridge. The State Street bridge was a similar type of drawbridge that occasionally opened to allow barges heading up the Woodbridge river. The State Street Bridge was replaced by a cement non movable bridge around the late 1980's

Trenton Bridge (New Jersey)
Posted September 30, 2016, by Will Truax (Bridgewright [at] gmail [dot] com)
Trenton Bridge (New Jersey)
Posted September 27, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The early tied arch bridges were massive and indeed usually kinda odd looking. The lack of a straight upper chord led to some very creative ways to roof the structure. And from what I have read they were a nightmare to dismantle.

Trenton Bridge (New Jersey)
Posted September 27, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

It was probably one of the earliest substantial use of iron in an American bridge... and most certainly an oddball bridge to be sure...

Posted July 22, 2016, by Luke

IMO, the current rail line should be the one listed if the bridge has no official or common nickname.

After looking at the article the imagery came from again, the bridge is referred to in the article as the "Glenmoore Bridge", so perhaps we should call it a day and just name it "Glenmoore Railroad Bridge"...

Posted July 22, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] cfom)

Luke,

Not so much for this bridge but most people that I know locally, refer to the rail line as the old Reading line.

This may be more of an issue back east than it is in the mid-west. We had all sorts of railroads. Then, everything went Amtrak/Conrail now we see all sorts of stuff, including UP on the old Reading line. While the Northeast Corridor was originally Camden and Amboy then PRR it now has Amtrak, Conrail (yes, it still seems to exist) NJ Transit, Septa and possibly NS and CSX running on the same rails. To me, considering the history of the NE Corridor, in my mind the connection is to the PRR, not Amtrak, who technically owns the line. Also having the RR name first complicates the search.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted July 22, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Luke,

Most people around here that I know still refer to this rail line as the Reading line. I guess if this is the way the site wishes to handle it, I'll go along with it but it seems to go against the whole 'historic' thing.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted July 22, 2016, by Luke ( )

Yes, but given the fact there hasn't been a successful railroad merger in some time* that won't be too much of an issue.

(*Not to mention the fact that the most recent attempt at a merger was admonished by multiple politicians, including the justice department.)

Posted July 22, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Luke,

I understand keeping the two sections as one bridge. However, the CSX thing confuses me. Does this mean the bridge's name changes with each railroad merger?

Regards,

Art S.

Posted July 22, 2016, by Luke

The abutment for the DPG is built into the arch segment, so I'd consider the DPG to be a part of the same structure.

Also, railroad names are as relevant/pertinent as highway names are in the title.

Posted July 22, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Do we define the deck plate girder bridge over the roadway as a separate bridge or part of the same bridge?

Posted July 22, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

To give others a sense of what's going on, think about taking a little county bridge with poor sight lines that should be OK for 100 cars a day then ty to force thousands of cars a day across it!

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/20/nyregion/new-jersey-roads-...

New Jersey Drivers Fume as Road and Bridge Work Stops

By PATRICK McGEEHAN and EMMA G. FITZSIMMONS JULY 19, 2016

Photo

Stalled bridge construction near Princeton, N.J., on Route 518. Construction began in early July but Gov. Chris Christie, at impasse with lawmakers on a gasoline-tax increase, stopped road work around the state.

Credit Fred R. Conrad for The New York Times

Several miles from Princeton, drivers are playing chicken as they detour across a single-lane bridge. In Summit, the prolonged shutdown of a century-old crossing has forced nearby businesses to lay off workers. And in Hoboken, the delay of the long-awaited rehabilitation of a critical connection to the Lincoln Tunnel threatens to disrupt back-to-school traffic.

Across New Jersey, residents accustomed to complaining about all of the road work undertaken during the summer months now have something different to moan about: Hundreds of those improvement projects have ground to a halt, victims of a political stalemate among state lawmakers. In many places, the orange cones and mesh netting are still in place, but the backhoes and road graders sit idle, as do more than 1,000 construction workers across the state.

The long days and abundant sunshine of the season make it prime time for fixing the roads and bridges that keep things moving in New Jersey, which, like many states, is saddled with aging infrastructure. But for more than a week, those ideal conditions have been squandered as the state’s political leaders argue about whether and how to raise the state’s gasoline tax.

With no agreement and the state’s Transportation Trust Fund — which is financed by the tax — nearly drained, Gov. Chris Christie ordered that all work stop on a long list of projects throughout the state. That left the completion of construction scheduled for this year in jeopardy, said Anthony Attanasio, executive director of the Utility and Transportation Contractors Association of New Jersey.

“One thing everyone agrees on is that government is responsible for providing safe and reliable infrastructure for taxpayers,” Mr. Attanasio said. But, he added, since Mr. Christie’s executive order took effect on July 8, “we’re in this weird limbo where no work’s getting done.”

With Mr. Christie and other Republican leaders at their party’s national convention in Cleveland this week, a deal to end the stalemate is unlikely in the coming days. The chances of reaching one before the Democrats wrap up their convention in Philadelphia late next week seem nearly as slim.

Photo

Gov. Chris Christie, left, at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland.

Credit Eric Thayer for The New York Times

The 50-page list of stalled transportation work represents more than $3 billion in projects to upgrade roads, bridges and mass transit. New Jersey Transit, the agency that runs the state’s commuter rail and bus network, has had to suspend its order for dozens of new buses until the financing issue is sorted out.

Continue reading the main story

James Kennelly, a spokesman for Hudson County, said officials there had been advised to expect the suspension of work on the Park Avenue Bridge, which connects Hoboken and Weehawken, to extend to the end of July.

What is clear is that shutting down and restarting projects will add to their cost, driving up the total price significantly in some cases. Hudson County, Mr. Kennelly said, estimates the stoppage will add as much as $120,000 to the cost of rehabilitating the bridge.

In several towns on the northern border of Princeton, the closing of the Route 518 bridge this month — and the subsequent shutdown of work two days later — has sent cars onto other traffic-clogged routes over the Millstone River, leading to angry exchanges among drivers. The work was scheduled to be finished this fall. Now the bridge could be closed much longer.

Donato Nieman, the administrator in Montgomery Township, said he had seen drivers getting into arguments when they were rerouted to a one-lane bridge to the north. Some drivers have even played chicken on the bridge, facing each other until someone backs down, he said.

“You get the rolling down of windows and the hurling of less-than-charming language,” Mr. Nieman said, noting that officers were sent to park in driveways nearby in an effort to encourage drivers to behave.

The police in nearby Franklin Township, in Somerset County, have received complaints about road rage shouting matches at another crossing to the south. Sgt. Philip Rizzo, a spokesman for the Police Department, said the community had seen major traffic backups, especially during the evening commute.

Document: New Jersey Town Asks State to Deem Bridge Project Essential

Local leaders have asked the state to deem the Route 518 bridge an essential project and to restart the work since it is a critical route for emergency responders trying to reach a hospital. Theodore Chase, the deputy mayor in Franklin Township, questioned why work began on the bridge on July 6, even as uncertainty lingered over state funding.

His wife, Victory Chase, was stuck in traffic at an alternate crossing as she returned home on a recent evening after volunteering at a library.

“It took me an hour to do something that takes less than 10 minutes normally,” Ms. Chase said.

Stephen Schapiro, a spokesman for the state’s Transportation Department, said officials had developed the detour with local communities before the project began and that the Route 518 bridge would have been closed this week even if a shutdown had not been ordered. Since work on the bridge had already started, it was no longer safe for traffic, Mr. Schapiro said.

Down the block from the Route 518 crossing, Barry M. Gerlack, the owner of a travel business, said he was furious with Mr. Christie over the impasse. Not only is his commuting longer, but a pizza deliveryman recently called him frantically asking for detour directions in the hopes of keeping a pie hot.

“We have our own Bridgegate here — it’s unbelievable,” he said.

A deal over transportation financing appeared near last month, but Mr. Christie and Democratic leaders in the State Senate could not agree over which tax cuts to pair with a 23-cent increase in the gas tax. On Monday, Mr. Christie told reporters in Cleveland that he had rejected a new financing proposal from Stephen M. Sweeney, a Democrat and president of the State Senate, and would meet with Mr. Sweeney after the convention. Mr. Sweeney’s office said that Mr. Christie had not offered his own counterproposal.

Since Mr. Christie ordered the shutdown, he has been preoccupied with a series of political setbacks. Last week, David Samson, his longtime friend, pleaded guilty to using his position as chairman of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey for his personal benefit. A day later, Mr. Christie was passed over to serve as Donald J. Trump’s running mate.

At the Morris Avenue bridge in Summit, residents complained of rerouted traffic filling quiet neighborhoods with the sounds of revving engines and honking horns. On Monday afternoon, a group of teenagers walked down the sidewalk as they sought a way around the closed bridge.

Photo

An idle bridge repair site. Officials are complaining that time is running out to finish many jobs before schools open. Credit Fred R. Conrad for The New York Times

Jim Jorgensen, 50, a financial analyst who lives in Summit, walked past the idle construction site.

“How long does it take to build a bridge?” he asked.

The project in Hoboken had been underway for just two days when Mr. Christie ordered the shutdown, Mr. Kennelly, the Hoboken spokesman, said. Workers had begun chipping away at the old concrete on the bridge, one of two that connect Hoboken and Weehawken just south of the Lincoln Tunnel.

“Our main concern was that we found ourselves in a tricky position because it is very difficult to get in and out of Hoboken,” Mr. Kennelly said. “We wanted to try to manage things so that we didn’t increase any period of time of aggravation.”

County officials asked the contractors to cover up the work its crew had done and reopen the lane of traffic that had been closed off, Mr. Kennelly said. Before the suspension of the work, the plan had been to have crews work for 12 hours a day six days a week through mid-September.

Under that schedule, the project could have been completed without much nighttime labor and before school buses start rolling again in the fall, Mr. Kennelly said. But now that plan will have to be reworked with the understanding that it will extend well past the end of summer.

Construction industry officials, Mr. Attanasio said, still hope that elected officials can work out a solution before the end of the month. If not, he said, the stalemate could grow into a more dire condition.

“If you get into August, you’d be going from hundreds of projects to thousands of projects” shut down, he said. “That’s going to affect every single person in New Jersey and anyone who travels through our state and anyone who ships goods and services to and from our state.”

Nate Schweber contributed reporting.

A version of this article appears in print on July 20, 2016, on page A1 of the New York edition with the headline: Anger as Work Stops on Roads in New Jersey. Order Reprints| Today's Paper|Subscribe

Posted July 22, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/20/nyregion/new-jersey-roads-...

New Jersey Drivers Fume as Road and Bridge Work Stops

By PATRICK McGEEHAN and EMMA G. FITZSIMMONS JULY 19, 2016

Photo

Stalled bridge construction near Princeton, N.J., on Route 518. Construction began in early July but Gov. Chris Christie, at impasse with lawmakers on a gasoline-tax increase, stopped road work around the state.

Credit Fred R. Conrad for The New York Times

Several miles from Princeton, drivers are playing chicken as they detour across a single-lane bridge. In Summit, the prolonged shutdown of a century-old crossing has forced nearby businesses to lay off workers. And in Hoboken, the delay of the long-awaited rehabilitation of a critical connection to the Lincoln Tunnel threatens to disrupt back-to-school traffic.

Across New Jersey, residents accustomed to complaining about all of the road work undertaken during the summer months now have something different to moan about: Hundreds of those improvement projects have ground to a halt, victims of a political stalemate among state lawmakers. In many places, the orange cones and mesh netting are still in place, but the backhoes and road graders sit idle, as do more than 1,000 construction workers across the state.

The long days and abundant sunshine of the season make it prime time for fixing the roads and bridges that keep things moving in New Jersey, which, like many states, is saddled with aging infrastructure. But for more than a week, those ideal conditions have been squandered as the state’s political leaders argue about whether and how to raise the state’s gasoline tax.

With no agreement and the state’s Transportation Trust Fund — which is financed by the tax — nearly drained, Gov. Chris Christie ordered that all work stop on a long list of projects throughout the state. That left the completion of construction scheduled for this year in jeopardy, said Anthony Attanasio, executive director of the Utility and Transportation Contractors Association of New Jersey.

“One thing everyone agrees on is that government is responsible for providing safe and reliable infrastructure for taxpayers,” Mr. Attanasio said. But, he added, since Mr. Christie’s executive order took effect on July 8, “we’re in this weird limbo where no work’s getting done.”

With Mr. Christie and other Republican leaders at their party’s national convention in Cleveland this week, a deal to end the stalemate is unlikely in the coming days. The chances of reaching one before the Democrats wrap up their convention in Philadelphia late next week seem nearly as slim.

Photo

Gov. Chris Christie, left, at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland.

Credit Eric Thayer for The New York Times

The 50-page list of stalled transportation work represents more than $3 billion in projects to upgrade roads, bridges and mass transit. New Jersey Transit, the agency that runs the state’s commuter rail and bus network, has had to suspend its order for dozens of new buses until the financing issue is sorted out.

Continue reading the main story

James Kennelly, a spokesman for Hudson County, said officials there had been advised to expect the suspension of work on the Park Avenue Bridge, which connects Hoboken and Weehawken, to extend to the end of July.

What is clear is that shutting down and restarting projects will add to their cost, driving up the total price significantly in some cases. Hudson County, Mr. Kennelly said, estimates the stoppage will add as much as $120,000 to the cost of rehabilitating the bridge.

In several towns on the northern border of Princeton, the closing of the Route 518 bridge this month — and the subsequent shutdown of work two days later — has sent cars onto other traffic-clogged routes over the Millstone River, leading to angry exchanges among drivers. The work was scheduled to be finished this fall. Now the bridge could be closed much longer.

Donato Nieman, the administrator in Montgomery Township, said he had seen drivers getting into arguments when they were rerouted to a one-lane bridge to the north. Some drivers have even played chicken on the bridge, facing each other until someone backs down, he said.

“You get the rolling down of windows and the hurling of less-than-charming language,” Mr. Nieman said, noting that officers were sent to park in driveways nearby in an effort to encourage drivers to behave.

The police in nearby Franklin Township, in Somerset County, have received complaints about road rage shouting matches at another crossing to the south. Sgt. Philip Rizzo, a spokesman for the Police Department, said the community had seen major traffic backups, especially during the evening commute.

Document: New Jersey Town Asks State to Deem Bridge Project Essential

Local leaders have asked the state to deem the Route 518 bridge an essential project and to restart the work since it is a critical route for emergency responders trying to reach a hospital. Theodore Chase, the deputy mayor in Franklin Township, questioned why work began on the bridge on July 6, even as uncertainty lingered over state funding.

His wife, Victory Chase, was stuck in traffic at an alternate crossing as she returned home on a recent evening after volunteering at a library.

“It took me an hour to do something that takes less than 10 minutes normally,” Ms. Chase said.

Stephen Schapiro, a spokesman for the state’s Transportation Department, said officials had developed the detour with local communities before the project began and that the Route 518 bridge would have been closed this week even if a shutdown had not been ordered. Since work on the bridge had already started, it was no longer safe for traffic, Mr. Schapiro said.

Down the block from the Route 518 crossing, Barry M. Gerlack, the owner of a travel business, said he was furious with Mr. Christie over the impasse. Not only is his commuting longer, but a pizza deliveryman recently called him frantically asking for detour directions in the hopes of keeping a pie hot.

“We have our own Bridgegate here — it’s unbelievable,” he said.

A deal over transportation financing appeared near last month, but Mr. Christie and Democratic leaders in the State Senate could not agree over which tax cuts to pair with a 23-cent increase in the gas tax. On Monday, Mr. Christie told reporters in Cleveland that he had rejected a new financing proposal from Stephen M. Sweeney, a Democrat and president of the State Senate, and would meet with Mr. Sweeney after the convention. Mr. Sweeney’s office said that Mr. Christie had not offered his own counterproposal.

Since Mr. Christie ordered the shutdown, he has been preoccupied with a series of political setbacks. Last week, David Samson, his longtime friend, pleaded guilty to using his position as chairman of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey for his personal benefit. A day later, Mr. Christie was passed over to serve as Donald J. Trump’s running mate.

At the Morris Avenue bridge in Summit, residents complained of rerouted traffic filling quiet neighborhoods with the sounds of revving engines and honking horns. On Monday afternoon, a group of teenagers walked down the sidewalk as they sought a way around the closed bridge.

Photo

An idle bridge repair site. Officials are complaining that time is running out to finish many jobs before schools open. Credit Fred R. Conrad for The New York Times

Jim Jorgensen, 50, a financial analyst who lives in Summit, walked past the idle construction site.

“How long does it take to build a bridge?” he asked.

The project in Hoboken had been underway for just two days when Mr. Christie ordered the shutdown, Mr. Kennelly, the Hoboken spokesman, said. Workers had begun chipping away at the old concrete on the bridge, one of two that connect Hoboken and Weehawken just south of the Lincoln Tunnel.

“Our main concern was that we found ourselves in a tricky position because it is very difficult to get in and out of Hoboken,” Mr. Kennelly said. “We wanted to try to manage things so that we didn’t increase any period of time of aggravation.”

County officials asked the contractors to cover up the work its crew had done and reopen the lane of traffic that had been closed off, Mr. Kennelly said. Before the suspension of the work, the plan had been to have crews work for 12 hours a day six days a week through mid-September.

Under that schedule, the project could have been completed without much nighttime labor and before school buses start rolling again in the fall, Mr. Kennelly said. But now that plan will have to be reworked with the understanding that it will extend well past the end of summer.

Construction industry officials, Mr. Attanasio said, still hope that elected officials can work out a solution before the end of the month. If not, he said, the stalemate could grow into a more dire condition.

“If you get into August, you’d be going from hundreds of projects to thousands of projects” shut down, he said. “That’s going to affect every single person in New Jersey and anyone who travels through our state and anyone who ships goods and services to and from our state.”

Nate Schweber contributed reporting.

A version of this article appears in print on July 20, 2016, on page A1 of the New York edition with the headline: Anger as Work Stops on Roads in New Jersey. Order Reprints| Today's Paper|Subscribe

Posted July 22, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

http://www.franklintwpnj.org/Home/Components/News/News/3184/...

Update on Rt. 518

Post Date:07/20/2016 4:00 PM

The NJDOT has completed adjustment of traffic signal timing on Route 27 in the Kingston area. These changes were made to help traffic flow due to the increased volume resulting from the closure of the Route 518 Bridge over the D&R Canal. There are still delays during the AM & PM rush hours, but we have seen some improvement with the signal timing changes. The Griggstown Causeway continues to be a location with significant delays during the rush hours and motorists are advised to avoid that area if at all possible. We are aware of the inconvenience and frustration caused by the bridge closure and will continue to work with NJDOT and County officials to mitigate the impacts as much as possible.

Posted July 22, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Matt,

You are probably correct. However, its a multi-span pony that literally ends at a T intersection with relatively heavy traffic and poor sightlines. To me, this is the worst kind of compromise, an 'in-kind' replacement that really provides no benefit over the prior structure while eliminating the actual historic artifact.

Its shortcomings have really come to a head as the next crossing (Rt. 518) a relatively major route was closed for repair of the canal bridge (adjacent to the river) and, due to NJ politics, is now closed indefinitely as all state DOT work has stopped due to a political pissing contest.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted July 21, 2016, by Matt Lohry

I found it rather odd as well that they chose to build a one-lane bridge here...I would guess that the reason is to limit the traffic flow, and to make it inconvenient enough to force the majority of people to take alternate routes to somewhat protect this area, as it appears that it might have some environmental importance to it. Hardly seems worth it, though, with all of the problems that it seems to be causing...

Posted July 21, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

I crossed that bridge yesterday. I don't know why they kept it as a one lane bridge when they replaced it. Seems kind of pointless of killing a historic bridge only to install a duplicate replacement. That said, even with a four lane bridge, the intersection would still suck.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted July 21, 2016, by DSue

This bridge is not safe for today's traffic. There is no need in 2016 for a one lane pony truss. It is not even the original bridge so therefore, it's not historic.

I have witnessed so many scary things happen. Two people trying to cross at once, cars backing up onto River road and almost getting hit by other cars passing when there is clearly a sign that says no passing. I have witnessed multiple fights, verbal AND physical. I have sat in line for over 10 minutes once because two cars stuck on it head one couldn't back off because all the cars behind them went too.

This is a heavy traffic area. It needs a two lane bridge!

Posted July 21, 2016, by DSue (donnarich734 [at] msn [dot] com)

This bridge is not safe for today's traffic. There is no need in 2016 for a one lane pony truss. It is not even the original bridge so therefore, it's not historic.

I have witnessed so many scary things happen. Two people trying to cross at once, cars backing up onto River road and almost getting hit by other cars passing when there is clearly a sign that says no passing. I have witnessed multiple fights, verbal AND physical. I have sat in line for over 10 minutes once because two cars stuck on it head one couldn't back off because all the cars behind them went too.

This is a heavy traffic area. It needs a two lane bridge!

Posted July 10, 2016, by David Caputo (davidacaputo [at] msn [dot] com)

I am a life long resident of Point Pleasant and I have fond memories of the old route 88 bridge. I heard that the bridge was sold and it is somewhere in Texas. Is this true, and where is it now?

Thank You,

David Caputo

Posted May 6, 2016, by Rhoda (Vwgal16 [at] comcast [dot] net)

I have lived in Montgomery township for over 10 years. The Giggstown Causeway Bridge needs to be evaluated for safety. It has heavy traffic and is only a one lane bridge, while others in area are 2 lanes. Due to the location of bridge it is a dangerous bridge and area. Though many need the bridge to cross over from middlesex county into somerset county.

What are the steps for the bridge to become considered a 2 lane bridge.

Posted May 5, 2016, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

It is the longest span of its type in the United States, however, it is the fourth longest span in the world, with the longest cantilever truss span in the world being the famous Quebec Bridge http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=qu...

Posted May 5, 2016, by Andrew B (anti3 [at] aol [dot] com)

This bridge was built while I was in High School (Nether Providence). I recall it was the longest span of its type when built. I also (think) I recall there were some structural issues originally and that for many years there were cables installed to stabilize the trusses, I could be wrong about that, as I don't see the cables in any photo. I was always a little sad to see the Chester-Bridgeport Ferry go away when the bridge was opened. We used to take the ferry (and later the bridge) to the NJ shore. I personally enjoyed the ferry trip...Dad never did. The bridge was an occasional Friday trip to NJ in my HS days for...umm...refreshments that I could not purchase (legally) in PA:)

Trenton Bridge (New Jersey)
Posted April 4, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

So Nathan,

This one is a bit or a conundrum, it's a wood covered bridge but it has a unique design that is essentially a bowstring with wood compression and iron tension members. Is this the long lost missing link or is it an abomination? :^)

Regards,

Art S.

Posted March 29, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Thanks Luke,

The stringer always struck me as a weird addition but I guess it was always needed for the road/interurban line.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted March 24, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted March 17, 2016, by Jim Mason (jhm5th [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This was a manually-operated swing bridge that has not been operable for at least 30 years. It is posted at 3 tons and was recently reduced to a one lane bridge by narrowing the cartway. It was featured in the movie "Eddie and the Cruisers".

Posted March 17, 2016, by Jim Mason (jhm5th [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This bridge has been replaced.

Posted March 8, 2016, by ArtS

Well,actually the neighboring county.

Posted March 8, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Nice job Nathan, I didn't even know this one existed and it's in my county!!

Regards,

Art S.

Posted March 6, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Temporary repairs complete, reopening with 20 Ton limit and a truck detour until permanent repairs complete:

http://planetprinceton.com/2016/03/06/route-206-in-princeton...

Note: this is a 1792 bridge that George Washington (and probably all of our founding fathers) crossed. With temporary repairs on significant damage - 20 Ton limit and no longer a primary truck route!

Posted March 2, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Its interesting to see how differently the failures of this bridge and Iowa's Wagon Wheel Bridge are being handled.

Article with pictures:

http://www.centraljersey.com/news/princeton-damage-to-stony-...

http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/centraljersey.co...

http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/centraljersey.co...

An 18th-century-bridge on Route 206 over the Stony Brook has a “damaged” foundation area that will require crews to pump in concrete to stabilize the foundation and immediate area, municipal officials said Monday in adding the bridge will “possibly” remain closed into next week.

The discovery of the latest problem, disclosed to the town by the state Department of Transportation, was triggered after a stone parapet on the southbound lane collapsed last week. The need to repair that damage led to more inspections finding cracks and voids in the arches that hold up the bridge, with the state also concerned about the southern abutment or end of the bridge, the town said.

At her regular press conference, Mayor Liz Lempert told reporters that a diver, who is also an engineer, went into the water to look at the foundations of the bridge. “They are damaged,” she said.

In particular, there is erosion of the soil that supports the bridge, town engineer Robert V. Kiser said.

She said the state was putting in temporary dams on Monday to divert the water to give authorities a “much better look at the state of the foundations of the bridge.”

“Once they’ve done that analysis,” she said, “they will have a better sense of how long the repairs are going to take them.”

A stretch of Route 206 between Hutchinson Drive and Lovers Lane has been closed in both directions since last week, so motorists have had to take detours to avoid the closure. The town has not received a firm timetable for when the bridge would reopen.

“So what they’ve told us is that it’ll definitely be closed through the end of this week, possibly through the end of next week,” she said.

For its part, DOT spokesman Kevin Israel said Monday that repairs are “more extensive” than first thought. He was checking to confirm the accuracy of Mayor Lempert’s statements about the foundations.

The bridge was constructed in 1792, and is believed to be the oldest bridge in continuous use on a state highway in New Jersey and possibly the country, Mr. Kiser said. The DOT was not immediately able to say Monday when the last time it had been inspected.

The bridge has historical protections, so the state has to make the repairs in a historically sensitive way.

“Obviously, you want to preserve both the historic integrity of it and also the structural integrity of it,” Mayor Lempert said.

She sought to explain what might have led to this round of problems with the old structure. She said that stretch of Route 206 had been mistakenly put on the state’s truck route map.

“Some of the damage that was being caused to the bridge was because you had vehicles coming over there that had no business being on top of that bridge, because the trucks were being directed there,” she said. “Now that’s been cleared up.”

Princeton has one other bridge that old, also built in 1792, on Mercer Road over the Stony Brook. Mr. Kiser said it was reconstructed by Mercer County in the late 1970s.

To fix the foundation problem, the state would need to pump in concrete. Based on Mr. Kiser’s experience, he said that kind of repair would take anywhere from a week-and-a-half to two weeks or longer, weather permitting.

As for detours, the state has said motorists travelling south on Route 206 should go right on Georgetown Franklin Road/CR518, left on Hopewell Princeton Road and right onto Route 206 south.

Northbound drivers should go left on Carter Road, right onto Georgetown Franklin Road and left back on Route 206 north.

Posted March 2, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

The bridge is closed indefinitely (April 30 estimate). Considering that thousands of cars a day crossed the bridge, this is creating a traffic mess.

Its fun to read the negative commentary:

https://www.reddit.com/r/newjersey/comments/48lhmt/rt_206_br...

Posted February 26, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Unlike truss bridges, which are closed for no apparent reason, 18th century stone arch bridges are kept open as the continue to collapse! They finally decided to close the bridge after additional failure and signs of arch failure:

http://nj1015.com/route-206-in-princeton-shuts-entirely-on-f...

A week long emergency project on Route 206 in Princeton led to the complete closure of the entire road on Friday.

The New Jersey Department of Transportation has worked all week on installing a concrete barrier on the north and southbound sides of the historic bridge over Stony Brook at Quaker Road near the Hun School, Bristol-Myers Squibb and Jasna Plana Country Club.

Traffic alternated one lane at a time all week but the road was completely closed between Carter Road and Elm Road on Friday. Traffic was backed up on many alternate routes including Fackler Road, Cherry Valley Road and Princeton Pike.

Lt. Jon Bucchere of the Princeton Police Department said additional damage to the wall developed on Thursday night.

“At some point the condition of the bridge worsened which required the shutdown,” Bucchere said. He expected the bridge to reopen by sometime Saturday afternoon or evening. The DOT in a statement Friday afternoon said that “cracks and voids” were discovered during an inspection by engineers in the the stone arches that support the structure.

According to the DOT, the original problem was a protective wall called a parapet that collapsed along the southbound side and needs to be replaced. Because of the historic nature of the bridge, the work must be done using similar construction methods. It’s not known how long the work will take to complete.

Posted February 23, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

I know that most of you are more interested in more elaborate structures than the humble stone arch but this 1792 bridge, built during George Washington's presidency (which would mean he crossed it!) is still in very heavy use today. Unfortunately, heavy use may have taken it's toll as the bridge just had a partial (hopefully minor) collapse:

http://www.nj.com/mercer/index.ssf/2016/02/partial_collapse_...

Posted January 21, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

To answer Andrew's question in the photo gallery about the floor beams, the reason they are riveted is because they were salvaged from an older pin-connected truss bridge and reused (potentially the previous bridge here... the historic bridge survey does say the previous bridge here was a pin-connected pony). That the floorbeams are salvaged from a pin-connected truss is made clear by the empty unused holes at the ends, including four flange holes at each end which would have received the u-bolt hangers. I field visited this bridge and will (eventually) have it added over at historicbridges.org

Posted January 16, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

This bridge's restoration, together with D-300's ( http://bridgehunter.com/nj/hunterdon/10XX300/ ) won a preservation award:

http://www.nj.com/hunterdon-county-democrat/index.ssf/2015/0...

Posted January 16, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Hunterdon County Division of Roads, Bridges and Engineering won a preservation award for the restoration of this bridge and Stanton Station Road Bridge (the fraternal twin of the Paoli, IN bridge just mashed by a truck):

http://www.nj.com/hunterdon-county-democrat/index.ssf/2015/0...

Posted January 16, 2016, by Alexander D. Mitchell IV

More on proposed replacement, including six-year timetable: http://www.app.com/story/news/traffic/commuting/2016/01/14/n...

Posted December 10, 2015, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Title says being replaced but article says $1.2M repair:

http://newyork.cbslocal.com/2010/10/11/historic-ho-ho-kus-br...

Nice picture included.

Posted October 5, 2015, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

A beautiful 3-span pinned Pratt truss, likely wrought iron from the 1880's. Assume it may have been a former road bridge that was retrofitted with the pipeline.

Posted October 5, 2015, by Luke

From the 2014 NBI: Built 1946; Rehabilitated 1994

Posted October 5, 2015, by Sharon Miller (sharon [at] arhenry [dot] com)

What year was this built and also when was the last time it was inpected? Rating?

Posted October 3, 2015, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Being 'retired' to a pedestrian crossing:

http://www.northjersey.com/news/nj-state-news/historic-span-...

Posted October 2, 2015, by Brian (palmerbfaf [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Looking to find the dimensions of this bridge for a scale model project. Also any additional photos of the bridge and it's support buildings and infrastructure.

Thanks

Brian

Posted September 25, 2015, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted September 25, 2015, by Anonymous

Link goes to a "Session Timeout"

Posted September 25, 2015, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Neat historic picture with a steam engine crossing and a now lost bridge upstream - first bridge's piers (Whipple Deck Truss) remain just upstream:

http://lcpdams.librarycompany.org:1801/view/action/nmets.do?...

Posted September 8, 2015, by Andrew Pearce

A bridge on Route 519 that collapsed under the weight of a crane more than a year ago is due to come down soon. Demolition is expected to start around Sept. 14, county Public Works Director Thomas Mathews said Friday.

http://www.nj.com/hunterdon/index.ssf/2015/09/demolition_of_...

Posted August 16, 2015, by Michael Dipsia (nilaa1 [at] verizon [dot] net )

I worked for the New Jersey Department of Transportation between 1983 and 1986. At that time, I was assigned to work on this Structure amongst other projects. I valued this unique experience working on such a structure as a first assignment after my Bachelor of Science education in Civil Engineering. The Resident Engineer was Joe Sorrento and Raymond International was the Contractor. This structure has a latex modified concrete overlay for the bridge deck. In order to allow the flow of big boats through the river, the bridge deck would be lifted from both ends using huge steel pulleys mounted on bridge towers and a counter weight effect on the other side of the towers to carry the bridge deck. In theory, each counter weight effect equals half the weight of bridge deck. This was a challenge to the Contractor to balance the weight in order to help carry the bridge deck. Large machinary would operate the pulleys. This is a beautiful structure but in my opinion more of a Manhattan look. Point pleasant is a small community along Jersey Shore. I have since moved to California and I am currently a Construction Manager for Caltrans on the West Side of Los Angeles, administering construction projects for the California Department of Transportation in the areas of Malibu, Santa Monica, the Pacific Palisades, West Los Angeles area and UCLA area.

CNJ - HD Draw (New Jersey)
Posted July 5, 2015, by Luke

I'll move them to that entry.

CNJ - HD Draw (New Jersey)
Posted July 5, 2015, by Ed. Hercel (ehercel1 [at] cox [dot] net)

first 4 photos are of a different bridge about a mile or so south

Posted July 1, 2015, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Many people complain or say 'something should be done' but few are willing to step up and do something. There are people that frequent this site that can restore that bridge in a cost effective manner but without strong organized local support you will not change the county's mind.

If there is strong organized local support, send me a point of contact and I'll try to help.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted July 1, 2015, by Linda Smith (endalanefarm [at] gmail [dot] com)

I was stung by the comment that said people down here don't care about this bridge. We have begged our county freeholders, who own the bridge and the road on which it sits, to do something about it, but they won't. Not only is the bridge collapsing, so is the access road. The loss of the bridge has cost us a lot of money, because we have to drive further to reach the closest town. It has also closed what was a vital evacuation route in the event of a disaster involving the Salem nuclear plants.

Posted June 11, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

If you view this photo in original size (you have to cut and paste the link, it wouldn't post right):

flickr.com/photos/8080806@N04/9637711474/

so that you can see the detail of the finials on the bridge, noting not only the spherical top portion, but more importantly the distinctive rectangular portion on the bottom of the finial, you will find yet another strong argument that Massillon Bridge Company fabricated this bridge, with I P Bartley likely being the on-site erection contractor.

The finials on this bridge are the same design as the 6th Street Bridge in Grand Rapids: http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=tr... ... as well as the long-demolished Fulton Street Bridge, also a Massillon in Grand Rapids: http://grpl.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15...

Posted May 28, 2015, by Alexander D. Mitchell IV (LNER4472 [at] verizon [dot] net)

Actually, the PRSL was indeed merged into Conrail, but the line that bridge was on was not part of the property transferred to Conrail. I think NJ Transit ended up taking over the right-of-way "just in case".

Posted April 23, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Nancy... maybe you are confusing this bridge listing with the larger and nearby bridge over Rancocas Creek itself: http://bridgehunter.com/nj/burlington/3C4004/

Neither of these bridges have photos, so please consider posting some if you happen to live nearby and/or have some photos to share.

Posted April 23, 2015, by Nancy Burkley (nburk [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Why is this called Parkers Creek... We have always known it as Rancocas Creek, one of the longest in NJ.

Posted April 20, 2015, by Bill Woodall (wpwoodall [at] gmail [dot] com)

You'll need to classify this one as "Lost" - it was removed during 2014 and replaced by a grade crossing.

http://www.nj.com/hunterdon-county-democrat/index.ssf/2014/0...

Posted March 13, 2015, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted March 12, 2015, by Giacomo DeStefano (museumGiacomo [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I recently found these two images of the High Bridge in the "Art Work of Paterson: Published in Twelve Parts," 1892. G. DeStefano, Director of the Paterson Museum

Posted March 11, 2015, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

New bridge won an award. Old bridge is confirmed to be stored for future restoration and erection at the Howell Living History farm.

http://www.centraljersey.com/articles/2015/03/11/hopewell_va...

With a bit of luck there will be three historic bridges added to the three existing historic bridges in the valley.

Posted March 7, 2015, by Carolyn Susor (susorcar [at] yahoo [dot] comn)

That is one humongous bridge! I haven't been across it, but I've driven past it. It's the highest thing on the landscape for miles, & is just beautiful!

Posted March 3, 2015, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

A Whipple truss in it's technical definition IS a double-intersection Pratt truss.

So, both labels are appropriate.

Posted March 3, 2015, by Dennis Barnes (idighistory [at] mail [dot] com)

Hello I am searching for a bridge unknown location but it is referenced as Bridge Number M22 in Atlantic City, NJ. I am researching this because Last fall I was at Crowley's Landing park along the Mullica River and we found this copper plate in the parking lot near the boat ramp. We are thinking maybe Hurricane Sandy or Irene has sent this plate in this direction. We are trying to figure out how far it may have traveled. Any information would be great. Please view the photos of this plate we have in our possession.

Posted March 3, 2015, by Anonymous

This is actually a Whipple truss bridge - two spans. The placard calls it a "double intersection" Pratt truss.

Posted February 18, 2015, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted February 15, 2015, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

nice website related to the bridge with pictures:

http://taimages.railstotrails.org/6-Historic-Preservation-Re...

Posted January 30, 2015, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted January 27, 2015, by Ian Martin

Scheduled for replacement as a result of damage from Hurricane Sandy: http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2014/09/nj_transit_raritan_...

Posted January 26, 2015, by Douglas Butler

Luke this is the bridge you are talking about.

Posted January 20, 2015, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)