Rating:
1 vote

Monadnock Mills Bridge

Photos 

Claremont Moseley1

View looking upstream.

Photo taken by Marc N Belanger in May 2012

Enlarge

BH Photo #270085

Map 

Street View 

Description 

Mosley wrought-iron bowstring arch-truss bridge, built in 1870, carried employees, equipment, and utility lines across the Sugar River from Monadnock Mill No. 6 to the vicinity of the gasworks. It is a rare surviving example of this type of bridge, and was one of the first of its kind built in the United States. This bridge is on the NRHP as part of the Monadnock Mills complex. It is the only remaining Moseley bridge still in its original location.

Facts 

Overview
Abandoned bowstring through truss bridge over Sugar River on an old access into a building
Location
Claremont, Sullivan County, New Hampshire
Status
Abandoned (but still carries a pipe line)
History
Built ca. 1870's
Builders
- Moseley Iron Bridge & Roof Co. of Boston, Massachusetts
- Thomas Moseley (Design)
Design
Mosley bowstring arch-truss bridge
Dimensions
Total length: 77.0 ft.
Deck width: 8.0 ft.
Recognition
Posted to the National Register of Historic Places on February 15, 1979
Approximate latitude, longitude
+43.37425, -72.33818   (decimal degrees)
43°22'27" N, 72°20'17" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
18/715643/4805817 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Claremont South
Inventory numbers
NRHP 79000272 (National Register of Historic Places reference number)
BH 49549 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • September 22, 2015: Photo imported by Dave King
  • November 12, 2013: New photos from Marc N Belanger
  • October 28, 2013: New Street View added by Luke Harden
  • September 8, 2011: Updated by J.P.: added more info to description and builder
  • September 8, 2011: Updated by James McCray: Updated bridge's name to reflect is connection to Monadnock Mills and NRHP info

Sources 

Comments 

Unknown Bowstring Bridge
Posted September 13, 2011, by Nathan Holth

This sure does look like the bridge! If it really is a Moseley bowstring it would not be possible for me to overstate its historic significance and rarity with only one or two other bowstring bridges built by this company surviving.

As for the press, I am not surprised that they would get the location wrong. Whenever I read or hear news about a subject area I am knowledgeable in (like bridges) I am amazed at how many errors are made.

If somebody gets a new page going for this bridge in NH it would be nice if James Baughn could transfer this forum chain to the new page. I think our discussion here is an excellent example of how BridgeHunter and its contributors can work together to solve a mystery and expand the Internet's coverage of historic bridges.

Monadnock Mills Bridge
Posted September 8, 2011, by James McCray (jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Just found out that this bridge is on the NRHP as part of the Monadnock Mills complex in Claremont, NH and so, it no longer being a mystery, will be called the "Monadnock Mills Bridge."

Sugar River "Mysterious" Bowstring Bridge
Posted September 8, 2011, by James McCray (jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This is the newly created page for the "Unknown Bowstring Bridge (see http://bridgehunter.com/vt/windham/mystery-bowstring/) that is incorrectly listed in VT. Since the bridge is now confirmed to be in a completely different state and county (Sullivan County, VT) is is necessary for a brand new page for this bridge to be completed. The "Mysterious" in the name of the bridge title remains until someone gives more accurate details about this bridge--its name, history, etc.

Unknown Bowstring Bridge
Posted September 8, 2011, by James McCray (jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Ok, now that it is pretty much confirmed that this bridge is actually in NH and not in VT, I am going to create a brand new page for this bridge with its listing in the correct location (NH), due to the fact that one cannot transfer a bridge page across state lines, or county lines for that matter.

So, assuming it is alright with everyone else, and it seems the best thing to do for this bridge, I am going to create a brand new page for this bridge so it reflects its actual location. Then I will upload the photos that are already used for this bridge, from the old page. Then once that is done I will request that the old page will be merged or deleted.

What makes no sense to me is what started this whole thing is a news story whose subject is flooding in VT but used video footage from NH all the while saying that the flooding is in Brattleboro, VT. As I see it, this is an "EPIC FAIL" in basic geography skills (or lack thereof) on part of the press.

Unknown Bowstring Bridge
Posted September 8, 2011, by Craig Philpott (cphilpott [at] puc [dot] edu)

All the way from California... this sure looks like a match to me. I just did some surfing in BING looking at the larger context and all the buildings and visible white faced walls match up with the video. And, by the way, there is another historical steel truss just downstream next to another old mill....

Unknown Bowstring Bridge
Posted September 7, 2011, by Luke Harden (lmharden [at] iastate [dot] edu)

I'm pretty sure that IS the bridge in question.

Unknown Bowstring Bridge
Posted September 7, 2011, by J.P.

also who ever decides to add the page after we confirm this. Here is the builders info.

13. Mosley wrought-iron bowstring arch-truss bridge, built in 1870, carried employees, equipment, and utility lines across the Sugar River from Monadnock Mill No. 6 to the vicinity of the gasworks. It is a rare surviving example of this type of bridge, and was one of the first of its kind built in the United States.

Moseley Iron Bridge Company

Unknown Bowstring Bridge
Posted September 7, 2011, by J.P.

I believe I have found it by the luck of the Vermont historic bridge inventory guy named Bob. He recommend I got to St, Claremont NH. Were I found a bowstring in the same condition, the deck that me and Tony saw was actually a pipe line running across it, and the angle is not a straight on angle but a more oblique angle as you can see in the bing image I have included.

also there is a haers photo of it here.

http://www.historicmapworks.com/Buildings/index.php?state=NH...

I'm pretty sure I'm on the nose this time.

Mystery Bowstring Bridge
Posted August 31, 2011, by K. A. Erickson

I am skeptical of that assumption Tony. The image shows a row of buildings to the right and a wall of water coming down towards the camera. The location suggested seems at first the easy answer as there is a bridge there but the buildings? A Bing eye view indicates a parking lot. Buildings in the area there are on the south not north. To match the TV image and visualize the water would have to be moving East to West, which is not possible. Unless the buildings were quickly added since the satellite fly-by? One building has a faded look to it so I doubt that.

The bridge location currently suggested connects two parking lots, presumed active, in use.

Give Bing a try and look around.

Or look here for flood photos of that site.

http://web.me.com/vermontviews/vermontviews/Flat_Street_Floo...

Rest:

http://web.me.com/vermontviews/vermontviews/Flat_Street_Floo...

That bridge was built in 2003: "A pedestrian bridge will be placed across the Whetstone Brook between the Preston Parking Lot on Flat Street and the Brattleboro Food Co-Op parking lot for the duration of the project."

Mystery Bowstring Bridge
Posted August 31, 2011, by James McCray (jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I am going to go ahead and do the following and update some of the bridge info:

I will add the gps coordinates to reflect that the bridge is, indeed, the little pedestrian bridge that is in question. I will also rename the bridge the "Brattleboro Pedestrian Bridge" until someone either finds out the actual name of the bridge or the name of the creek that it crosses. Either way, when more accurate info can be gathered on this bridge we can update then.

Always glad to add my 2 cents.

James

Mystery Bowstring Bridge
Posted August 31, 2011, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The more I look at the picture, the more I believe it to be the bridge that J.P. spotted on satellite imagery. I think the bridge on the news footage does indeed have a deck that is mounted above the lower chords and appears to slant downward slightly away from the buildings.

Mystery Bowstring Bridge
Posted August 31, 2011, by J.P.

Here is the video that you got the picture from.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pet4fqRW0vA&feature=related