Rating:
2 votes

Steinhart Park Road Bridge

Photos 

Photo taken by James McCray

Enlarge

BH Photo #207457

Map 

Street Views 

Facts 

Overview
Through arch bridge over South Table Creek on Steinhart Pk Road
Location
Nebraska City, Otoe County, Nebraska
Status
Open to traffic
History
Built 1998
Design
Timber through arch
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 125.0 ft.
Total length: 126.0 ft.
Deck width: 27.9 ft.
Approximate latitude, longitude
+40.67609, -95.87843   (decimal degrees)
40°40'34" N, 95°52'42" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
15/256722/4506785 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Nebraska City NW
Inventory number
BH 47551 (Bridgehunter.com ID)
Inspection (as of 07/2015)
Deck condition rating: Good (7 out of 9)
Superstructure condition rating: Very Good (8 out of 9)
Substructure condition rating: Very Good (8 out of 9)
Sufficiency rating: 68.9 (out of 100)
Average daily traffic (as of 2012)
1,785

Update Log 

  • February 26, 2014: New photos from Jack Schmidt
  • August 3, 2011: New photos from James McCray
  • January 7, 2011: Added by James McCray

Sources 

  • James McCray - jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com
  • Jack Schmidt - jjturtle [at] earthlink [dot] net

Comments 

Steinhart Park Road Bridge
Posted January 10, 2011, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

If you are into these wooden thru arch bridges I believe there is another modern one like this in LaSalle County Illinois NOT currently listed on this website. I drove over it on the way to the Seneca Bridge.

Steinhart Park Road Bridge
Posted January 8, 2011, by Craig Philpott (cphilpott [at] puc [dot] edu)

To me, this is an example of a modern bridge that DOES deserve inclusion in this site. In the "about this site" page, the grand webmaster includes reference to newer bridges that use old designs, arches and trusses and such. This bridge is notable for its uniqueness and use of materials. http://bridgehunter.com/help/about

Steinhart Park Road Bridge
Posted January 8, 2011, by Matthew Lohry

I fully agree that this bridge is very unique and has the potential to become historic sometime in the future. But, having said that, I'm of the mindset that the name of the website is "Historic Bridges of the United States", so I personally would probably not place this bridge on this site, just because of the name. This bridge would be an excellent entry for Landmarkhunter.com, however, because that title is "Historic and NOTABLE landmarks of the US". This bridge is certainly notable, just not historic--yet.:>)

Steinhart Park Road Bridge
Posted January 7, 2011, by Anthony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This is a very unique and interesting span to say the least.

Does it belong on Historic Bridges of the U.S. ....well, probably not (technically....at least) but I personally have less of a problem with it being on here than many others that have been added lately. This bridge reminds me of the Tied-Arch spans (Ohio had several of them) of the early 1800's. The retro aspect of this bridge is what gives it appeal......at least in my eyes.

Steinhart Park Road Bridge
Posted January 7, 2011, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I think that this bridge belongs on this website. Now, if these bridges started appearing by the thousands, then I would consider them to be too common for inclusion, but for now, this appears to be a unique structure.

Steinhart Park Road Bridge
Posted January 7, 2011, by Robert Thompson

>>Here is one for debate: This bridge was built in the late 90's so its quite modern. But design wise, it is a wood through arch bridge. So what does everyone think about this one?<<

My thought is that is it has features that are TRULY unique, such as you are describing, then it certainly merits mention. I use that criteria in including modern bascule and vertical lift bridges on the website.

Ferryboats were included on this site long before I became involved; I have authored or added to entries to ferryboats on the website. I understand they are not bridges, but do serve a similar function to bridges. In every case, they have been custom-designed for the particular location. There is no such thing as a "stock" ferryboat. Because of my line of work I have a ready source of information and photos...

However, "slab bridge that replaced something that once was here" does not cut it. (Sheldon, please take note.)

RKT

Steinhart Park Road Bridge
Posted January 7, 2011, by James McCray (jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Lately the debate on bridgehunter has been about posting modern bridges vs. historic/antique ones. Here is one for debate: This bridge was built in the late 90's so its quite modern. But design wise, it is a wood through arch bridge. So what does everyone think about this one?