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BNSF - Gassman Coulee Trestle

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Photos 

Looking west

Photo taken 1999 by Jason Smith

Map 

Street View 

Description 

At tallest point, 117 feet high. In addition to freight, also carries Amtrak Empire Builder trains.

Facts 

Overview
Steel girder trestle over the Gassman Coulee on the BNSF Railway, west of Minot
Location
Ward County, North Dakota
Status
Open to traffic
History
Built 1899, replacing an 1887 wooden trestle bridge that was destroyed by tornado in August 14, 1898.
Design
Deck plate girder
Dimensions
Total length: 1,792.0 ft.
Also called
Gassman Coulee Bridge
Approximate latitude, longitude
+48.22978, -101.38616   (decimal degrees)
48°13'47" N, 101°23'10" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
14/322800/5344592 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Minot NW
Inventory number
BH 23726 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Categories 

19th Century (4,492)
BNSF Railway (746)
Built 1899 (194)
Built during 1890s (1,760)
Deck girder (2,848)
Girder (5,070)
Have street view (15,935)
North Dakota (486)
Open (31,229)
Owned by railroad (6,243)
Plate girder (3,726)
Railroad (8,135)
Tall Bridges (227)
Total length 1000-2500 feet (1,354)
Ward County, North Dakota (11)

Update Log 

  • May 24, 2013: New photo from Luke Harden
  • May 15, 2013: Updated by Luke Harden: Added categories "Great Northern Railway", "Amtrak"
  • May 15, 2013: Updated by Nathan Holth: Added date, length, and other history.
  • March 10, 2012: New photo from Craig Philpott
  • July 16, 2011: New Street View added by Bob Morgan
  • April 18, 2010: New photo from Nathan Morton
  • November 17, 2009: Updated by J Lance: Added coordinates
  • July 29, 2009: Updated by J Lance: Corrected name of bridge
  • July 18, 2009: Updated by J Lance: Corrected name of valley
  • December 7, 2005: Posted photos from Jason Smith

Sources 

Comments 

Minot Viaduct
Posted September 9, 2007, by JO AKA BRIDGEFREAK

This is quite similar to the beam railraod bridge within several feet next to sandstone's deck pratt truss bridge. There isn't a girder on it, however it has a fascinating history!!! It was made with only rail on the deck to allow large loads of mined sandstone slabs to be hauled and is still used today though the trains crawl across it verrry sloowwly!! This is how sandstone,mn got it's name and beautiful qaurry and river scenery! Watch for pics!!!