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Posted October 14, 2019, by mhwilliams (bnfhistory [at] msn [dot] com)

Very glad this info was posted, most helpful for my research. But one very minor criticism: the agency is the U.S. Forest Service or (groan) the USDA Forest Service, but NOT the "National Forest Service." Thanks!

Posted October 6, 2019, by Werner Henning (heikowhenning [at] aol [dot] com)

Sounds awesome, at least in the Winter of 1989, have the EPS samples still on file.

Posted September 19, 2019, by David Jones (david2jpix [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This is obviously not a through truss bridge. The lady who lives here told me that this bridge was moved to this location in 1978 or 1979. She wasn’t quite sure. She did not say what was used here to cross the creek before that. She also said that the original location of this bridge was a few miles farther to the west where it was used to cross Elk Creek in Swallow Canyon. This was on the "Old Elk Creek Road" that is now closed off to any through traffic.

Posted September 13, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)
Posted May 19, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

Interesting Railing, 1950's Montana Design?

Posted May 19, 2019, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Another from Blackiron Grill.

Posted May 19, 2019, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Blackiron Grill in Miles City pays homage to iron bridges. The bartender tells me this is the Tongue River Bridge at the fairgrounds.

Posted May 16, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

Echoing Luke, Thanks for making the journey!

Posted May 16, 2019, by Luke

Thanks for getting out to these bridges, David.

Your work in Montana is much appreciated, as the region is woefully underrepresented on here.

Posted May 14, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

pin at rt 338 NBI rt 335

Posted May 14, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

Private Bridge, Relocated?

Posted May 14, 2019, by David Jones (david2jpix [at] yahoo [dot] com)

The Pony Truss Bridge has been replaced.

Posted May 14, 2019, by David Jones (david2jpix [at] yahoo [dot] com)

It appears like the pony truss bridge was removed and replaced with this pre-stressed concrete bridge.

Posted April 22, 2019, by Sean Rotinski (Seanrotinski [at] gmail [dot] com)

the MILW called this Bridge AA-424.

Posted April 22, 2019, by Sean Rotinski (Seanrotinski [at] gmail [dot] com)

this bridge was named DD-142 by the MILW.

Posted April 8, 2019, by Luke

David, your postcard is clearly of a road bridge, not a railroad bridge.

Posted February 7, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Possibly 1938...this is from the Independent-Record on March 25 1937

Posted February 7, 2019, by Greg Harper (gh200k [at] gmail [dot] com)

Any idea when this first bridge would have been removed?

Thanks,

Greg

Posted January 13, 2019, by John C Stutz (john [dot] stutz [at] spcrr [dot] org)

These spans are actually plate-lattice deck girders, a type that may be unique to the Northern Pacific railroad of the middle 1890s. This plate lattice type was originally used on the NP main, for replacing first generation wooden Howe truss bridges. See "Standard Plans for 100-Ft. Through Plate-Lattice Girder Bridges; No. Pac. Ry." in Engineering News of July 8 & 15, 1897 for design motivations, drawings, and details.

NP's several plate-lattice designs were briefly their standard for both deck and through girder bridges in the 85' to 105' range. The type apparently fell out of favor as locomotive weights increased, probably due to the difficulty of strengthening the lattice section. Main line spans would have gradually been recycled to branch lines, probably by circa 1905-15. An original through plate-lattice girder, initially installed at Lightening Creek near Clark Fork Idaho, which carried builder's plates naming it as such into the 1970s, ended at Orofino Idaho on the Camas Prairie's very lightly rated Kamiah branch.

These Missoula spans represent a further reuse, made by partially dismantling several original twin girder deck spans, replacing the lateral bracing, and reassembling them as triple girder spans. I suspect this occurred during the 1930s. The resulting capacity increase, from about E-33 to E-50, would have strengthened them sufficiently to carry the branch line engines that originally displaced them from the main. There may still be a second example, located about 1.5 miles north of Palouse, Washington, along highway 27. I am not aware of any others.

Posted December 3, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The Northern Pacific Railroad Research Library has been updating documents. This AFE (authority for expenditure) gives the original location of these trusses.

http://www.nprha.org/NP%20AFE%20scans6/0719-17.pdf?fbclid=Iw...

Posted August 4, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

A Northern Pacific bridge book indicates that this structure was installed here in 1918, meaning it was relocated from another location. This other location is likely on the former NP mainline, hence the plaques stating the third crossing of the Yellowstone River.

Posted August 3, 2018, by John Bernhisel (Johnmbernhisel [at] gmail [dot] com)
Posted June 5, 2018, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

Flagged as a duplicate

Posted June 5, 2018, by Anonymous

Might be more effective to actually say it is a duplicate of

https://bridgehunter.com/mt/yellowstone/bh72418/

Posted June 5, 2018, by Anonymous
Posted April 27, 2018, by David Jones (david2jpix [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge sits off in a field with no approach to it.

Posted April 5, 2018, by Luke

It's no problem, it's happened to me as well.

Posted April 5, 2018, by Richard Doody (rpdoody3 [at] gmail [dot] com)

It appears to be a broken hyperlink in the homepage map. I initially clicked on Mineral Co. MT which took me to a list that county which did not list this bridge. It was only when I attempted to import the NBI info that I discovered that a page for this bridge already existed. I had a similar experience with using the map for Whitman Co., WA to post the Tekoa viaduct. Sorry for the duplication.

Posted April 5, 2018, by Luke
Posted March 27, 2018, by Gavin (gavin [dot] n [dot] dean [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks for posting this. I grew up in the Yellowstone Country Club and had no idea this was so close!

Posted March 25, 2018, by Matt

This is called the Three Dollar Bridge. This section was moved from (I believe) Sappington on the Jefferson River when that bridge was replaced. Its twin span is still sitting off of Hwy 2 about a mile and a half east of the US287/MT2 junction. I can remember in June 2001 passing this bridge section two days in a row, once north of Ennis and the next day it was south of Ennis on the highway.

Posted March 16, 2018, by K. Stubbs (kestubbs [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The image at the provided link seems to show a Pratt Truss structure, not a Warren Truss.

Posted March 9, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

This is actually a duplicate

Cyr Bridge (Montana)
Posted March 9, 2018, by Russell Ward (russwatersolutions [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Made a youtube video of it with my drone if ypu wish to use

https://youtu.be/R6W4OJaPa-w

Posted February 7, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The loss of this bridge would be a tragedy. It is a beautiful structure that almost reminds me of something that P E Lane would have thought up. I'm not suggesting that he was the builder here but the incredible amount of lacing on this bridge reminds me of some of his structures.

Regardless of builder, this is a great Victorian era Pratt truss bridge. A bridge like this is rare in the Mountain West.

Posted February 6, 2018, by Sheila N. (silvermese [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This is scheduled to be demolished. 😢

http://www.kbzk.com/story/37443728/gallatin-county-commissio...

Posted January 31, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

1900?

Posted December 19, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Yet another UNIQUE RARE HIGHLY SIGNIFICANT historic truss bridge damaged by a idiot truck driver (35 ton truck over 7 ton bridge) who again proves that some humans have significantly less intelligence than an earthworm with its brain removed... with earthworms, the brain is important for movement: if the brain of the earthworm is removed, the earthworm will move continuously... much like a truck driver ignorant of weight limit signs.

http://www.greatfallstribune.com/story/news/2017/12/18/one-k...

Posted December 5, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I realized I never posted an interesting history I learned about this bridge. The bridge clearly is a Morse Bridge Company bridge, the portal bracing is identical to Michigan's Six Mile Creek Bridge's unusual portal bracing, right down to the place where the builder plaque belongs (which is mysteriously missing). What made this story interesting is Montana DOT's historian Jon Axline totally countered the idea that Morse built the bridge... he provided proof that Security Bridge Company erected the bridge in 1908. However we cannot deny the Morse Bridge Company details, the portal bracing is too unique to dismiss. I therefore believe that Security Bridge Company erected a reused and slightly altered Morse Bridge Company span. It is quite possible they did this unscrupulously, perhaps claiming that it was an all-new product. I believe they added the existing sway bracing (As a Morse bridge it may have originally had only upper laterals and no sway bracing or struts). They may also have carefully removed the Morse plaque to conceal the fact that it was a salvaged bridge.

Here is what Jon Axline told me:

Until October 1892, the future site of the Johnson/Kern’s Crossing Bridge was in the Crow Indian Reservation, which precluded any structures like this from being constructed. I did the research on the Johnson/Kern’s Crossing Bridge and can state conclusively that it was built in 1908 by the Security Bridge Company (Sweet Grass and Carbon counties let the contract in 1907). Attached is a copy of the Historic Property Form for the bridge, please note the sources used to determine the construction date.

Posted October 26, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Matthew:

You mentioned that you changed the license to "All Rights Reserved" as requested by Nathan...

But, he did not ask you to change the license, he asked you to remove them. These are simple instructions. Nathan holds the copyright to his photos. Please do as he has asked.

If you truly do not understand copyright law, we are glad to help you out.

Troy Bridge (Montana)
Posted October 25, 2017, by Tom Hoffman

Spectacular bridge with two long Parker spans.

Posted October 23, 2017, by David Jones (david2jpix [at] yahoo [dot] com)

According to NBI, this bridge was replaced in 2013 by a pre-stressed concrete bridge.

Posted October 15, 2017, by David Jones (david2jpix [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge is listed as closed. However, I drove across it and there is traffic that uses this bridge - the road is well used. There are no barricades or notices or anything else to show any closure of this bridge.

Posted September 4, 2017, by David Jones (david2jpix [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge has been replaced

Posted August 8, 2017, by Christopher Finigan

Bridge is actually a Pennsylvania truss and was probably relocated to its current place in 1946.

Posted June 23, 2017, by Matt Lohry

The Bing Streetside car has been through here; this is a beautiful Parker through truss bridge in an equally beautiful setting! Is it possible to add Bing Streetside views to the site? There are many bridges that have Streetside views that do not have GE Streetview.

Posted June 21, 2017, by Sarah Cooper (jasonandsarahcooper [at] yahoo [dot] com)

The bridge was rebuilt last year. It would be interesting to see your updated assessment.

Posted May 18, 2017, by David Jones (david2jpix [at] yahoo [dot] com)

The spans of this bridge are different. The northern span seems to be pin connected while the southern span is riveted. The date on the southern abutment is 1928 but the builder's plaque on the southern span, the riveted one, is 1899. Was the southern span moved to this location? NBI says the bridge was built in 1928.

Posted April 27, 2017, by Tom Koller (Tk48states [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Have seen this trestle many times, what can't be viewed from photo is center steel section in otherwise all wood construction presumably to save half in case of fire and/or for increased strength.

Posted April 19, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

It is both sad and disgusting to see that the public has been mislead into believing a modern welded pre-fab truss bridge will be "maintaining the bridge’s architectural look." Not true. A modern welded truss has as much in common with a pin-connected truss as a goose does with a sparrow. They are both birds. Otherwise, they are totally different.

http://flatheadbeacon.com/2017/04/18/flathead-county-approve...

Posted April 3, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Likely a floorbeam bridge. Here is one in New Jersey: http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=ne...

Posted April 3, 2017, by Beck

I vote turntable. Where it's at yo.

Posted April 3, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Recycled fishbelly floorbeams perhaps?

Posted March 16, 2017, by David Jones (david2jpix [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge is on private property.

Posted March 15, 2017, by David Jones (david2jpix [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Builder's Plaque says this bridge was built by the King Bridge Co of Cleveland Ohio.

Posted March 15, 2017, by David Jones (david2jpix [at] yahoo [dot] com)

According to the builder's information plate, this bridge was built in 1899 by the MO Bridge & Iron Works of Leavenworth Kansas. Even though it crosses the river, it appears to be on private land.

Posted December 1, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Jason... first off rehabilitation isn't a "bad word" its still preservation... but just a very different form of preservation than restoration, so I strongly believe using the right word is critical. People need to understand what the benefit is to "restoration", and what's unique about restoration-focused solutions such as those offered by Workin' Bridges and Bach Steel. They need to understand they are getting a more true-to-form end-product.

As for this bridge, I am not sure of the exact scope of work but I think its a safe bet we aren't looking at restoration of the through truss span, more of a rehabilitation. Use of bolts instead of rivets, etc. What I am 100% certain of however is we have demolition and replacement of the historic riveted pony truss span and replacement with modern pre-fab welded truss. Google Streetview clearly illustrates the original pony truss span.

As for the bedrock, I have no idea where you read that their was a connection between bedrock and the need to replace the pony truss span. I see no mention of that connection in the article. Bedrock and soils are things that typically affect substructure work not superstructure work.

Posted December 1, 2016, by Jason Smith (flensburg [dot] bridgehunter [dot] av [at] googlemail [dot] com)

Actually Nathan, the bridge has been restored. They just replaced the decking and did the repainting, while at the same time, placed the crossing onto newly rebuilt piers. What's different with the bridge is a pony truss approach span, which was needed because of the bed rock they encountered while trying to put the bridge back in its place. In either case, I see this as restoration with a twist. ;-) Link: http://mtstandard.com/news/local/silver-bridge-to-span-big-h...

Posted October 26, 2016, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

According to the NP Bridge Book, the superstructure (trusses) were built 1927 while the towers/bases were built in 1885

http://research.nprha.org/Tacoma%20Division%20Bridge%20Book/...

Posted October 25, 2016, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I think the deck truss spans are newer than 1885. Note riveted connections. Also, this postcard showing what I believe are the 1885 George Morison designed spans:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/photolibrarian/15249472751

Posted October 17, 2016, by Dennis (dmwierz1 [at] icloud [dot] com)

Correction, the image is captioned "Looking west", which is still incorrect. Should be "Looking north".

Posted October 17, 2016, by Dennis (dmwierz1 [at] icloud [dot] com)

This overall view cannot be from the west. The bridge runs east-west, and this view is from the south.

Posted September 23, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Oh my... I would say simple... And anything but simple!

Posted September 23, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is an incredible bridge! Now is it simple or continuous...?

Posted September 22, 2016, by David Jones (david2jpix [at] yahoo [dot] com)

The landowner said this bridge was moved to this location somewhere around 2010. He said it came from a location on the Sun River west of Great falls Montana.

Posted September 21, 2016, by David Jones (david2jpix [at] yahoo [dot] com)

“Convict labor built the first reinforced concrete bridges in Montana in 1912. Only one bridge, however, was a concrete slab. The Warm Springs Creek Bridge at the Montana State Hospital in Deer Lodge County is a simple one span bridge. The bridge is 19 feet wide and 27 feet long: it has concrete wing walls and a wood sidewalk”.

“The use of convict labor for road and bridge construction was an important facet in the early attempts by the Montana counties to improve their transportation system. Montana State Penitentiary warden Frank Conley believed the experience gained by convict road builders would be useful to them once released from prison”.

“Between 1913 and 1917 the convict road gangs contributed significantly to the state’s transportation system”.

"Monuments Above The Water - Historic Bridges Of Montana" by Jon Axline. Pages 71 & 72.

Posted September 21, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Another 4 slope Parker!

Posted September 21, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

And you can't convince me that any money was saved after the historic bridge was torn out and replaced, and then the MOB was purchased and erected. They could have simply built a new road bridge on an altered alignment and then kept the truss in place for the trail!

Posted September 21, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Ironically, a MOB was used for the hiking trail, when a truss was available just a few feet away. This scene really epitomizes what many of us hope to prevent. I am glad to see these photos on here because they make a great visual aid.

Please keep adding photos of bridges in your area.

Posted September 21, 2016, by Matt Lohry

Wow, a plain stringer bridge with ugly Armco railings, and a Wal-mart MOB pedestrian bridge right next to it--how utterly scenic!

Posted September 20, 2016, by David Jones (david2jpix [at] yahoo [dot] com)

The bridge listed here has been replaced with a new bridge - Date unknown. Photos are of new bridge.

Posted August 25, 2016, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This combination truss is not mentioned in "Conveniences Sorely Needed" either. However the book does have a photo showing that the previous Scenic Bridge in Mineral County was a similar combination truss as well. (Page 46 if you have the book). Sadly no info is provided on the date/builder however.

http://bridgehunter.com/mt/mineral/scenic/

Posted August 25, 2016, by David Jones (david2jpix [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Talking to a local rancher, he said he did not know the history of the bridge but he remembers that it used to be a part of Highway 434 until the highway was realigned.

Posted August 25, 2016, by K. Allen Ballard (speedeeprint [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nice work David. Happy Bridge Hunting!

Posted August 24, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

WOW! This is an awesome discovery!

Posted August 24, 2016, by Luke

This bridge looks very similar to the bridge over the same river near Coburg. https://bridgehunter.com/mt/blaine/coburg/

Posted August 24, 2016, by David Jones (david2jpix [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge stands about 7-8 feet west of an older wooden through truss bridge that was evidently abandoned when this bridge was built.

Posted August 24, 2016, by David Jones (david2jpix [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge is not listed anywhere I could find. It is located about 7-8 feet east of Bridgehunter #22973. Up to this point, no history available. The sign on top of the bridge is so rusted it is difficult to read but looks something like - "-ont-omery & --- 1--7". At least that's what it seems to read. It has been abandoned a long time and a couple of the beams that supported the deck are deteriorating and coming apart.

Posted August 13, 2016, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Based on the older topo this is probably the original site of the crossing.

Posted August 12, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Looks like it was moved there and placed on some concrete footers.

Posted August 12, 2016, by James McCray (jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge seems to be in a field. The river it supposed to cross seems to have shifted to the north. The road that it supposed to carry does not exist, but somebody with greater knowledge than I can chime in on this.

Posted July 23, 2016, by David Jones (david2jpix [at] yahoo [dot] com)

The information for the bridge located here is incorrect. The bridge that is here crosses Ten Mile Creek and is only about 30 feet long. It is a wood stringer bridge with bolted on guardrails. The information for the bridge that is listed on this page is for somewhere else and I haven't been able to find a physical through truss bridge that is nearly 90 feet long that crosses Sweet Grass Creek. Enclosed is one photo of the present bridge. NBI lists this bridge correctly it appears.

Posted July 17, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Well, I hope they are just leaving it in place and not sawing the trusses off and setting them on the bridge. And that 280 traffic count... Is that per month? I have a hard time believing that is a daily count!

Posted July 17, 2016, by David Jones (david2jpix [at] yahoo [dot] com)

As of July 16, 2016 this bridge is in the process of being bypassed and then possibly removed or incorporated into the new bridge design.

Posted June 29, 2016, by David Jones (david2jpix [at] yahoo [dot] com)

The person who gave me permission to photograph the bridge did not have any information about the history of the bridge. The northwest top rail going from the ground to the top is not riveted like the rest of the bridge. The rivets have been replaced with bolts.

Posted May 24, 2016, by John A. Jackson (jojackson [at] mt [dot] gov)

Photos

Posted May 24, 2016, by John A. Jackson (jojackson [at] mt [dot] gov)

Photos

Posted May 24, 2016, by John A. Jackson (jojackson [at] mt [dot] gov)

Photos

Posted May 24, 2016, by John A. Jackson (jojackson [at] mt [dot] gov)

Location Update +45.94965, -110.45417

Photos attached

Posted May 24, 2016, by John A. Jackson (jojackson [at] mt [dot] gov)

Photos

Posted May 24, 2016, by John A. Jackson (jojackson [at] mt [dot] gov)

Photos

Posted May 24, 2016, by John A. Jackson (jojackson [at] mt [dot] gov)

Photos

Posted May 24, 2016, by John A. Jackson (jojackson [at] mt [dot] gov)

Replaced by a new bridge in 2011

Posted May 24, 2016, by John A. Jackson (jojackson [at] mt [dot] gov)

Photos

Posted May 24, 2016, by John A. Jackson (jojackson [at] mt [dot] gov)

Replaced by a new bridge in 2006

Posted May 24, 2016, by John A. Jackson

Spring flooding in 2011 changed the location of the Judith River channel at the location of the bridge. The road has since been abandoned by Fergus County and the bridge has been demolished

Posted May 19, 2016, by John A. Jacskon (jojackson [at] mt [dot] gov)

Photos

Posted May 19, 2016, by John A. Jackson (jojackson [at] mt [dot] gov)

This truss has been removed and replaced with a T-beam bridge

Posted May 19, 2016, by John A. Jackson (jojackson [at] mt [dot] gov)

Photos

Posted May 19, 2016, by John A. Jackson (jojackson [at] mt [dot] gov)

Photos