Rating:
1 vote

Swan River Bridge

Photos 

Photo taken by Ron Kroetz

License: Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY)

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View this photo on Flickr

BH Photo #335457

Map 

Street View 

Facts 

Overview
Pratt through truss bridge over Swan River on CR 672 in Bigfork
Location
Bigfork, Flathead County, Montana
Status
Open to traffic
Future prospects
Slated for demolition and replacement with modern welded truss, ca. 2020.
History
Built 1911
Design
Pratt through truss
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 119.1 ft.
Total length: 120.1 ft.
Deck width: 15.4 ft.
Vertical clearance above deck: 16.2 ft.
Recognition
Posted to the National Register of Historic Places on August 3, 2015
Approximate latitude, longitude
+48.05927, -114.07269   (decimal degrees)
48°03'33" N, 114°04'22" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
11/718104/5327033 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Bigfork
Inventory numbers
NRHP 15000484 (National Register of Historic Places reference number)
BH 23027 (Bridgehunter.com ID)
Inspection (as of 11/2015)
Deck condition rating: Satisfactory (6 out of 9)
Superstructure condition rating: Poor (4 out of 9)
Substructure condition rating: Fair (5 out of 9)
Appraisal: Structurally deficient
Sufficiency rating: 25.0 (out of 100)
Average daily traffic (as of 2003)
2,000

Update Log 

  • August 11, 2017: Updated by Christopher Finigan: Added category "Pin-connected"
  • April 21, 2017: New Street View added by Dave King
  • April 19, 2017: Updated by Nathan Holth: This bridge is now doomed.
  • August 16, 2015: Photo imported by Dave King
  • August 14, 2015: Updated by Dave King: Bridge has been posted to the NRHP

Sources 

Comments 

Swan River Bridge
Posted April 19, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

It is both sad and disgusting to see that the public has been mislead into believing a modern welded pre-fab truss bridge will be "maintaining the bridge’s architectural look." Not true. A modern welded truss has as much in common with a pin-connected truss as a goose does with a sparrow. They are both birds. Otherwise, they are totally different.

http://flatheadbeacon.com/2017/04/18/flathead-county-approve...