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CR 068 Bridge

Photos 

Warm Springs Creek Bridge

View from the east

Photo taken by David Jones in September 2016

Enlarge

BH Photo #365618

Map 

Facts 

Overview
Slab bridge over Warm Springs Creek 016 on CR 068
Location
Deer Lodge County, Montana
Status
Open to traffic
History
Built 1912
Builder
- Convicts from Montana State Prison
Design
Slab
Dimensions
Span length: 26.9 ft.
Total length: 26.9 ft.
Deck width: 17.7 ft.
Also called
Warm Springs Creek Bridge
Approximate latitude, longitude
+46.18052, -112.78604   (decimal degrees)
46°10'50" N, 112°47'10" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
12/362153/5115654 (zone/easting/northing)
Inventory number
BH 73815 (Bridgehunter.com ID)
Inspection (as of 11/2015)
Deck condition rating: Fair (5 out of 9)
Superstructure condition rating: Fair (5 out of 9)
Substructure condition rating: Poor (4 out of 9)
Appraisal: Structurally deficient
Sufficiency rating: 36.0 (out of 100)
Average daily traffic (as of 2002)
100

Update Log 

  • September 21, 2016: Added by David Jones

Sources 

  • David Jones - david2jpix [at] yahoo [dot] com

Comments 

CR 068 Bridge
Posted September 21, 2016, by David Jones (david2jpix [at] yahoo [dot] com)

“Convict labor built the first reinforced concrete bridges in Montana in 1912. Only one bridge, however, was a concrete slab. The Warm Springs Creek Bridge at the Montana State Hospital in Deer Lodge County is a simple one span bridge. The bridge is 19 feet wide and 27 feet long: it has concrete wing walls and a wood sidewalk”.

“The use of convict labor for road and bridge construction was an important facet in the early attempts by the Montana counties to improve their transportation system. Montana State Penitentiary warden Frank Conley believed the experience gained by convict road builders would be useful to them once released from prison”.

“Between 1913 and 1917 the convict road gangs contributed significantly to the state’s transportation system”.

"Monuments Above The Water - Historic Bridges Of Montana" by Jon Axline. Pages 71 & 72.