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Waterman Avenue Overpass

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Photos 

Deck view, looking west

Photo taken by Mark Dellbringge in August 2010

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Map 

Facts 

Overview
Concrete slab bridge on Waterman Avenue (at Laurel Avenue) over the MetroLink in St. Louis
Location
St. Louis, Missouri
Status
Open to traffic
History
Built 1936 by the Missouri State Highway Department
Railroads
- MetroLink (BSDA)
- Wabash Railroad (WAB)
Design
Concrete slab
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 33.1 ft.
Total length: 91.9 ft.
Deck width: 44.0 ft.
Approximate latitude, longitude
+38.65011, -90.28961   (decimal degrees)
38°39'00" N, 90°17'23" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
15/735868/4281435 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Clayton
Inventory numbers
MONBI 12951 (Missouri bridge number on the National Bridge Inventory)
BH 45898 (Bridgehunter.com ID)
Inspection (as of 04/2014)
Deck condition rating: Fair (5 out of 9)
Superstructure condition rating: Fair (5 out of 9)
Substructure condition rating: Poor (4 out of 9)
Appraisal: Structurally deficient
Sufficiency rating: 36.8 (out of 100)
Average daily traffic (as of 2014)
3,800

Categories 

Built 1936 (1,000)
Built during 1930s (10,443)
Functionally obsolete (7,895)
MetroLink (16)
Missouri (5,903)
Open (36,161)
Owned by county (18,725)
Slab (1,504)
Span length 25-50 feet (13,356)
St. Louis, Missouri (140)
Total length 75-100 feet (5,860)
Wabash Railroad (542)

Update Log 

  • January 28, 2012: Updated by Luke Harden: Added category "MetroLink"
  • August 22, 2010: New photos from Mark Dellbringge
  • August 15, 2010: Added by Mark Dellbringge

Sources 

  • Mark Dellbringge

Comments 

Waterman Avenue Overpass
Posted November 19, 2014, by James Holzmeier (wabashry [at] gmail [dot] com)

Mark Dellbringge, you ask a very good question. As Kingsbury & Waterman are both municipal streets (and I can find no evidence, using Sanborn Maps throughout the years, that they were ever MO highways), the only thing I can postulate is that since these bridges were built during the Depression years, that maybe since federal funding, funneled through the state, paid for their construction, possibly that's why the state got credit for their construction. ???