Rating:
2 votes

Grand Avenue Viaduct

Photos 

Deck view, looking north

The arched portal reads: "Saint Louis University".

Photo taken by Mark Dellbringge in September 2010

Enlarge

BH Photo #175931

Map 

Street Views 

Facts 

Overview
Lost steel stringer bridge over Bernard Ave., Scott Ave., MetroLink, BNSF / Union Pacific railroads, and Gratiot St. on Grand Avenue in St. Louis
Location
St. Louis, Missouri
Status
Replaced by UCEB
History
Built in 1959, replacing the Grand Avenue Suspension Bridge as part of an "urban renewal project"; demolished March 14th, 2011; replacement UCEB opened to traffic July 13th, 2012.
Railroads
- MetroLink (BSDA)
- St. Louis Public Service Co. (PSCO)
- Streetcar
Design
From north to south:
- Steel stringer span over Bernard Avenue
- Deck arch main span over Scott Street, two tracks of MetroLink light rail service and the BNSF / Union Pacific Railroads
- Steel stringer span with steel pier supports over Gratiot Street
- Some stone cladding from the 1891 suspension bridge remained in place at the far southern abutment near Gratiot Street
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 180.1 ft.
Total length: 1,204.1 ft.
Deck width: 65.9 ft.
Approximate latitude, longitude
+38.62937, -90.23549   (decimal degrees)
38°37'46" N, 90°14'08" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
15/740648/4279274 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Granite City
Land survey
T. 45 N., R. 7 E., Sec. 21
Inventory numbers
MONBI 13136 (Missouri bridge number on the National Bridge Inventory)
BH 38490 (Bridgehunter.com ID)
Inspection (as of 04/2009)
Deck condition rating: Serious (3 out of 9)
Superstructure condition rating: Poor (4 out of 9)
Substructure condition rating: Fair (5 out of 9)
Appraisal: Structurally deficient
Sufficiency rating: 44.1 (out of 100)
Average daily traffic (as of 2009)
32,000

Update Log 

  • May 26, 2015: New Street View added by Elliott Johnson
  • May 25, 2015: Updated by Luke: Added categories "St. Louis Public Service Co.", "Streetcar", "Railroad", "Rail-and-road"
  • July 13, 2012: Updated by Mark Dellbringge: Status change: Bridge has been replaced.
  • January 28, 2012: Updated by Luke Harden: Added category "MetroLink"
  • September 2, 2011: New photos from Mark Dellbringge
  • August 26, 2011: New photos from Mark Dellbringge
  • July 27, 2011: Updated by Mark Dellbringge: Changed status description
  • March 24, 2011: New photo from Mark Dellbringge
  • March 19, 2011: Updated by Mark Dellbringge: Changed status to Lost: Bridge is being demolished.
  • March 13, 2011: Updated by Mark Dellbringge: Modified history and changed status: Bridge is closed to traffic.
  • March 1, 2011: Updated by Mark Dellbringge: Updated future prospects: date of closure
  • February 12, 2011: Updated by Mark Dellbringge: Posted additional photo from September 2010; updated with data from 2010 NBI
  • January 10, 2011: Updated by Mark Dellbringge: Updated history: some stone, supposedly from the 1891 suspension bridge, is evident on the far south abutment (see photos).
  • November 24, 2010: Updated by Mark Dellbringge: Modified future prospects and design description
  • September 15, 2010: Updated by Mark Dellbringge: Fixed GPS coordinates
  • September 5, 2010: New photos from Mark Dellbringge
  • August 25, 2010: New Street View added by Mark Dellbringge
  • June 13, 2009: Updated by Justin Zeid
  • March 21, 2009: Updated by Justin Zeid
  • March 2, 2009: Updated by Justin Zeid
  • January 8, 2009: Added by Kim Harvey

Related Bridges 

Sources 

  • Kim Harvey
  • Justin Zeid
  • Mark Dellbringge
  • Elliott Johnson - elliottsgon15 [at] hotmail [dot] com

Comments 

Grand Avenue Viaduct
Posted May 6, 2013, by Luke Firestoker (kjolen [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I knew this bridge during the last 30 years of its existence. It never was much to look at, little more than a continuation of Grand Ave that was raised above the railroad tracks. At that tme the bridge was already failing with rusted expansion joints and railings, although SLU painted the railings SLU blue. There were several places where rain or snow melt ponded on the roadway. When buses went through the puddles, they sent soaking sheets of dirty water onto the pedestrian walkways and any pedestrian who happened to be there. In winter time the sprayed areas became coated with ice and dangerous. After the metrolink stations were added, busses and cars stopping for passangers would block the outer lanes of traffic on the bridge creating congestion.

I was glad to see the bridge replaced. The new bridge is nicer, but I wish I could have seen the 1891 bridge. I read that there had been an earlier bridge located down in Mill Creek Valley. It was not very large and just extended across Mill Creek. From the description, Grand Ave descended from Forest Park Ave into the valley, crossed railroad tracks and the creek before it became part of the sewer system. Grand then ascended to Chouteau Ave. It is understandable why the raised bridge was built.

Grand Avenue Viaduct
Posted June 18, 2012, by Mark Dellbringge

The replacement UCEB is scheduled to open on 20120714. Work has been delayed due to work on the steel towers that mimic a part of the 1891 suspension bridge.

Grand Avenue Viaduct
Posted March 10, 2011, by Mark Dellbringge

Once the bridge has been closed, the northbound #70 bus would detour to the east along Chouteau and then continue north on 18th Street in order to make a connection with the MetroLink at Union Station.

Grand Avenue Viaduct
Posted March 3, 2011, by Mark Dellbringge

KMOV aired a story Tuesday March 1st, that the bridge will be closing on Monday March 14th for at least one year, possibly as long as two years. Removing the bridge will be complex because there are four active railroad tracks running beneath the bridge: two for rail freight, and two for MetroLink. Maybe Kozeny-Wagner will use the same "controlled demolition" method as was used to remove the old Highway 40 bridge (1940) at Clayton / Warson roads (the new I-64 project).

Grand Avenue Viaduct
Posted January 20, 2011, by Mark Dellbringge

Story aired yesterday on KMOV TV Channel 4 that this bridge is closing for demolition, and asks motorists to begin looking for an alternate route. On the west side of the closure, motorists heading north on Grand can use Chouteau, Vandeventer and Forest Park Parkway to return to Grand Avenue. Motorists can also use either the Compton Avenue or Jefferson Avenue viaduct to the east of the closure.

Grand Avenue Viaduct
Posted January 15, 2011, by Mark Dellbringge

Here is the link to the St. Louis Business Journal story about the bridge replacement:

http://www.bizjournals.com/stlouis/news/2011/01/06/kozeny-wa...

Grand Avenue Viaduct
Posted January 10, 2011, by Mark Dellbringge

Along with replacement of the Grand Avenue Viaduct, Metro (the St. Louis area mass transit system) will be involved with the rebuilding and redesign of the Grand MetroLink station. See this link for info:

http://www.metrostlouis.org/NewsProjects/Projects/Grand-Metr...

Grand Avenue Viaduct
Posted January 7, 2011, by Mark Dellbringge

Heard on News/Radio KMOX 1120 AM on its January 7th, 2011 edition: "The St. Louis Business Journal Report" segment reported that Kozeny-Wagner Construction Co. was awarded the construction contract for replacement of the Grand Avenue viaduct.

Grand Avenue Viaduct
Posted September 7, 2010, by Mark Dellbringge

This bridge was built in 1959 and I would have to call it an engineering failure. So many vehicles use this bridge on a daily basis. The driving surface of this bridge was notorious for its POTHOLES...yes, I said on the driving surface. Now it is paved over to hide the potholes. The sidewalk is also inadequate since the city installed concrete barricades on the sidewalks. In fact, while I was out photographing this bridge I noticed an expansion joint cover and a large hole you could see down through to the street below.

This bridge serves as a vital link for the St. Louis University campus. The main learning campus is on the north, the hospital and various dormitories reside on the south. When it is rebuilt, I hope dedicated access is given to MetroBus when it boards and alights passengers.