Rating:
1 vote

Skaggs Bridge

Photo 

Postcard

BH Photo #127807

Map 

Facts 

Overview
Lost multi-span through truss bridge over Gasconade River between Crocker and Waynesville
Location
Pulaski County, Missouri
Status
Replaced by new bridge
History
Replaced by the Pikes Peak Bridge in 1932
Builder
- Chicago Bridge Co. of Chicago, Illinois
Design
Pratt through truss
Also called
Skaggs Bridge
Crocker Waynesville Bridge
Approximate latitude, longitude
+37.87249, -92.22651   (decimal degrees)
37°52'21" N, 92°13'35" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
15/568028/4191949 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Waynesville
Inventory number
BH 38139 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Categories 

19th Century (6,800)
Built 1894 (215)
Built during 1890s (2,712)
Chicago Bridge Co. (17)
Lost (21,307)
Lost 1970 (50)
Lost during 1970s (557)
Missouri (6,109)
Pin-connected (3,659)
Pratt through truss (4,886)
Pratt truss (8,504)
Pulaski County, Missouri (22)
Replaced by new bridge (14,054)
Through truss (13,855)
Truss (30,960)

Update Log 

  • August 8, 2009: Updated by jeff huffman: corrected name
  • November 17, 2008: New photo from James Baughn
  • November 16, 2008: Added by James Baughn

Sources 

  • James Baughn - webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com
  • jeff huffman

Comments 

Crocker-Waynesville Bridge
Posted August 6, 2009, by Jeff Huffman (jeffhtry [at] yahoo [dot] com)

was looking at another bridge this morning and I hit the google map next to it. Have been looking at it all day and finally got into my area. As I have previosly stated I thought this bridge was located at the end of Brownsfield Road. Older locales have confirmed this. What I found interesting is that on this google map it shows Bobcat rd(the road at the end of Brownsville) crossing the river and connecting to Lexington Rd. I'm 33 years old but I have been traveling these backroads since I was ten. This map confirms to me that this is the location of this bridge

Crocker-Waynesville Bridge
Posted August 4, 2009, by snoop (snoopdorkydork71 [at] gmail [dot] com)

A contradiction of when this bridge was built. I believe this information is correct. This was in the 2008 edition of the Old Settler's Gazette.

"Of these three earliest bridges, only the

construction date for Skaggs is known. It

was erected in 1894 by the Chicago Bridge

Company. Chances are it was the first constructed,

providing the closest access for the

county seat at Waynesville to the railroad at

Crocker. The other two were built at least by

1906, as they appear on a county map of that

year."

My brother and I believe that we may have located the person who has the original marker for the bridge and we are going to try to get pictures of it to post here.

Crocker-Waynesville Bridge
Posted August 3, 2009, by snoop (snoopdorkydork71 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Found this in the 2008 edition of the Old Settler's Gazette.

"One of the first steel bridges built in Pulaski County, Skaggs Bridge was built in 1911. It crossed the Gasconade from Shockley Bottom on the south onto the Skaggs farm on the north side of the river.

Courtesy of Jan and Terry Primas.

http://www.oldstagecoachstop.org/webgeezer/BridgesofPulaski....

Crocker-Waynesville Bridge
Posted August 2, 2009, by Jeff Huffman (jeffhtry [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This was the original bridge that was between Crocker and Waynesville. It was located roughly 5 miles downstream from Pikes Peak bridge in the area known as Shockley Bottom. You can get to Shockley Bottom by driving down Lexington road which is located next to Pikes Peaks bridge. I can not find where the bridge actually crossed the river there because it is all growen up and is private property. To access the other side you head north towards Crocker and make a right hand turn on Brownville Rd. At the end of it if you was to turn right you would be heading towards the bridges location. This is private property as well as well and there is signs posted. You can located this area I'm describeing on a map at this site http://www.communitylink.com/us/mo/waynesville/map/county You can see where it would have crossed the river.