Rating:
1 vote

South Grand Avenue Bridge

Photos 

Overview

Photo taken by James Baughn

Request this photo

BH Photo #106738

Map 

Facts 

Overview
Two-span through truss bridge over Flat Creek on South Grand Avenue, south of Sedalia
Location
Pettis County, Missouri
Status
Open to one-lane traffic
History
Built in 1889 at at another location, relocated here 1904
Railroads
- Missouri Pacific Railroad (MP; MoPac)
- Rail-to-road
- Sedalia, Warsaw & Southwestern Railroad (SW&SW)
Design
Pair of pin-connected, 5-panel Pratt through trusses
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 84.9 ft.
Total length: 169.9 ft.
Deck width: 13.4 ft.
Vertical clearance above deck: 18.4 ft.
Recognition
Eligible for the National Register of Historic Places
Also called
Flat Creek Railroad Bridge
Approximate latitude, longitude
+38.65589, -93.24093   (decimal degrees)
38°39'21" N, 93°14'27" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
15/479037/4278619 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Sedalia East
Land survey
T. 45 N., R. 21 W., Sec. 21
Inventory numbers
MO 080-237002.0 (Missouri off-system bridge number)
MONBI 19867 (Missouri bridge number on the National Bridge Inventory)
BH 22289 (Bridgehunter.com ID)
Inspection (as of 02/2016)
Deck condition rating: Good (7 out of 9)
Superstructure condition rating: Fair (5 out of 9)
Substructure condition rating: Fair (5 out of 9)
Appraisal: Functionally obsolete
Sufficiency rating: 60.0 (out of 100)
Average daily traffic (as of 2016)
400

Update Log 

  • November 26, 2016: Updated by J Lance: Added year of construction
  • October 16, 2016: New photos from John Marvig
  • February 20, 2014: New photos from Jack Schmidt
  • February 5, 2007: Posted all new photos

Sources 

  • Ken Bird - klbird [at] earthlink [dot] net
  • Jack Schmidt - jjturtle [at] earthlink [dot] net
  • John Marvig - marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com
  • J Lance - bugo [at] hotmail [dot] com

Comments 

South Grand Avenue Bridge
Posted December 19, 2016, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

It was originally narrow gauge, but was standard gauged in 1902. It's very unlikely a 1920 bridge would have been built this light.

South Grand Avenue Bridge
Posted December 19, 2016, by Conrad Belnay (conbel1949 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Wasn't this originally a narrow gauge line? That might be the reason the bridge is not as massive as most early 1900's standard gauge bridges.

South Grand Avenue Bridge
Posted November 28, 2016, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

I don't know the RR history but perhaps that's when it became a road.

South Grand Avenue Bridge
Posted November 26, 2016, by John Marvig

Where did the 1920 date come from? I see zero evidence that this bridge dates to the 20th century. Books and experts on the railroad list the date as 1889, a much more likely build date

South Grand Avenue Bridge
Posted October 17, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nathan, I wondered about that too...

South Grand Avenue Bridge
Posted October 17, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Yes Nathan! I was TOTALLY impressed with the stupidity exhibited here as well...

*Kinda like my days back in Shop Class... If you mess it up, put 2 grooves in it and make an ash tray!

*If you don't know how to properly fix it... Just encase it in concrete!

South Grand Avenue Bridge
Posted October 17, 2016, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I got in contact with a local who has the history well down for this branch line. He says that the bridge here was built in 1898 by Missouri Pacific, to replace an aging timber bridge. If this is the case (and I won't doubt someone whos spent years of research on this subject), I would suspect the spans were relocated from another location.

South Grand Avenue Bridge
Posted October 17, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Outstanding. Someone decided the best thing to do with a historic pin-connected wrought iron truss bridge (designed to flex at each connection point) was to encase the bearings in concrete. Kill two birds with one stone that way... rot out the wrought iron AND compromise the function of the truss. Way to go.

South Grand Avenue Bridge
Posted October 17, 2016, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I appreciate the help! I will email the Pettis County historical society and see if they can give me a definitive answer. Otherwise, 1885 sounds far more correct than 1898.

South Grand Avenue Bridge
Posted October 16, 2016, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The 1886 topo shows the railroad as MO Pac, Sedalia, Warsaw, and Southwestern Branch. Several crossings of Spring Creek to the south, only the first of which is along the route of the present road.

South Grand Avenue Bridge
Posted October 16, 2016, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

The Missouri Historic Bridge Inventory lists a date of circa 1885. I can't remember where the 1898 date came from, but the earlier date seems more likely.

South Grand Avenue Bridge
Posted October 16, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I think it resembles some M&K/Union Bridge Co. spans from the 1880's.

South Grand Avenue Bridge
Posted October 16, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I would not be surprised if it was built 1880-1890. I can't say for sure though as I have less experience with railroad bridges than highway bridges.

South Grand Avenue Bridge
Posted October 16, 2016, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I'm going to go out on a limb and say this bridge is likely older than 1898..does anyone have any input on this? By 1898, railroad bridges were much more massive than this structure.

Flat Creek Railroad Bridge
Posted October 28, 2007, by John Hayes (jehayes54 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This bridge is still in service for one-way traffic as of October 28, 2007. It was originally built by the railroad for the short line between Sedalia and Warsaw. Between Warsaw and Sedalia the rail line also serviced the small towns of Cole Camp and Mora. At the southern terminus, Warsaw had a "Y" to turn the train around for the return trip. The Missouri Pacific Railroad (MoPac) operated this short line in its later years. I often cross it when going between my farm and Sedalia.