Rating:
3 votes

Hoblett Bottom Bridge

Photos 

First sighting, looking east

Photo taken by Clark Vance in August 2011

Enlarge

BH Photo #207587

Map 

Description 

NBI shows open in 1992, closed 1996, unlisted after that.

Facts 

Overview
Abandoned through truss bridge over Blackwater River on NE 501st Road
Location
Johnson County, Missouri
Status
Intact but with the abutment on the south washed out.
History
Built 1929 by the Standard Bridge Co.
Builder
- Standard Bridge Co. of Omaha, Nebraska
Design
Pin-connected, 10-panel Parker through truss
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 200.1 ft.
Total length: 236.9 ft.
Deck width: 13.5 ft.
Vertical clearance above deck: 16.0 ft.
Recognition
Eligible for the National Register of Historic Places
Also called
Blackwater River Bridge
Tin Bottom Bridge
Approximate latitude, longitude
+38.81692, -93.65199   (decimal degrees)
38°49'01" N, 93°39'07" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
15/443397/4296661 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Warrensburg East
Land survey
T. 47 N., R. 25 W., Sec. 34
Elevation
692 ft. above sea level
Inventory numbers
MO 051-153001.5 (Missouri off-system bridge number)
BH 42797 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • February 8, 2014: New photos from James Baughn
  • August 4, 2011: Updated by Clark Vance: Added photos, changed status, changed name
  • July 16, 2011: Updated by Clark Vance: Topo map elevation and quad
  • June 14, 2009: Added by James Baughn

Sources 

Comments 

Hoblett Bottom Bridge
Posted April 13, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

There were a couple of through trusses over the Blackwater that are now UCEBs. I don't recall a Monkey Mountain in Johnson County. There is such a place east of Grain Valley in Jackson, probably farther than students would want to drive just to hang out. Talking with a local when I visited Hobblet Bottom he spoke of a through truss near there but thought it was abandoned long ago. I have not found a location such as he described.

This is the sort of thing I enjoy exploring.

Hoblett Bottom Bridge
Posted April 13, 2018, by Don Morrison

Monkey Mountain was apparently north of Warrensburg.

Here's a bridge that was poular with students, then removed in 2013:

http://bridgehunter.com/mo/johnson/blackwater-13

Hoblett Bottom Bridge - Another Bridge in Close Vicinity
Posted April 13, 2018, by Todd W. Baslee (twbaslee [at] sbcglobal [dot] net)

Okay all - I need your help. While I know my bridges in my local area I am trying to remember one in particular from my college days in Warrensburg and a popular party spot. This would have been back in the late eighties and early nineties.

We called the area Monkey Mountain. That is all I can recall about it. The supposed story was someone got killed by a circus monkey in the area. I know it's a long shot but I've got to see what is left of the site - 30 years later.

Thanks for the help.

Todd

Hoblett Bottom Bridge
Posted January 30, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

In the link that Clark V. provided, Standard moved another bridge in 1929. While I have had difficulty opening all of the files, I suspect this bridge was moved in 1929 rather than built then - I thought rivet connections were standard by then.

Regards,

Art S.

Hoblett Bottom Bridge
Posted January 30, 2014, by Jason Smith (JDSmith77 [at] gmx [dot] net)

Well if anything, I can put out a notice on this bridge in my Chronicles' page. Any history on this bridge?

Hoblett Bottom Bridge
Posted January 29, 2014, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

I was finally able to visit this bridge on Jan. 27. It is a spectacular structure, but the dangling south end is certainly scary.

Like Dave C., I didn't attempt to cross the board to reach the bridge deck. The board is no longer anchored to anything, and the end is several feet off the ground. Clark Vance's photos showed tree branches that could be used to get a leg-up to reach the board, but those branches are now gone.

Seeing as how bridges in Johnson County are dropping like flies, it's hard to say whether this bridge has a future or not. Anybody need a 200-ft truss?

Hoblett Bottom Bridge
Posted January 19, 2013, by Dave Castaner (cass34 [at] mail [dot] com)

Jan 19, 2013. Still up and "looking good." Didn't walk on it because it was too dangerous to get on the access plank (south end). A great photo op.

Hoblett Bottom Bridge
Posted October 4, 2012, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

It's an unusual metal floor so I can see why it was "Tin Bottom". Did you ever hear the Hoblett name used?

Hoblett Bottom Bridge
Posted October 3, 2012, by Andy Brown (andy [dot] brown1229 [at] sbcglobal [dot] net)

Hello, my aunt and uncle have a farm up the road from this bridge I played on it around it anyway we all know this bridge as Tin Bottom.

Hoblett Bottom Bridge
Posted August 5, 2011, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

According to the MO historic bridge inventory, 1929 is correct and pretty well documented. This is a late Standard build.

http://epg.modot.mo.gov/documents/Historic_Bridge_Inventory/...

You can find it easily in the pdf bookmarks. They call it the Blackwater River Bridge.

I got the name Hoblett Bottom from a local I talked with. He looked over my map and gave me a couple of names for bridges in the area. He didn't know how to spell the name so I looked for families with similar names in the area.

Hoblett Bottom Bridge
Posted August 5, 2011, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I was looking at the other spans credited to the Standard Bridge Company which all date between 1908 and 1914. The 2 exceptions are this bridge and another demolished one that was in this same county. They are both pin-connected structures with a 1929 build date listed. I will assume that this is some sort of default date as both appear to be somewhat older.

Hoblett Bottom Bridge
Posted August 5, 2011, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The metal plates on the deck have rivets that have cone-shaped heads. This makes me suspect the plate is salvaged and reused boiler plate.

Blackwater River Bridge
Posted August 4, 2011, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Some pros for summer bridgehunting: The truck can get through bad roads, light clothes, safe climbing. Cons: Sweat, ticks, spider webs, leaves.

This was a surprisingly large bridge. The county road map (2005) still shows the road crossing, so I assume the road is still public. The road is just graveled ruts but it is suitable for most cars clear up to the bridge on the south. I didn't walk the north side but it looked a lot more overgrown.

Blackwater River Bridge
Posted January 15, 2010, by Anthony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Just bought my second Lumix camera.......they are like my children!

Blackwater River Bridge
Posted January 15, 2010, by Robert Thompson

Tell me about it. I just wiped out my nice Fuji with image stabilization in December. But I have a track record of wiping out a camera every year or two, because of the things I do in my spare time.

RKT

Blackwater River Bridge
Posted January 14, 2010, by Anthony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Jason..........Sorry but I posted a picture of the High Banks Bridge in Delaware County, Indiana on this bridges' page.

But in all fairness, it was totally J.R.s fault for doubting my willingness to brave the elements to visit a bridge.

I have visited historic bridges on my wedding anniversary!......what could possibly be more dangerous than that!!

Anyway......The High Banks Bridge was disassembled, restored, and reassembled in 2009. You can check it out here.......

http://bridgehunter.com/in/delaware/white-300s/

Blackwater River Bridge
Posted January 13, 2010, by Jason Smith (JDSmith77 [at] gmx [dot] net)

Say, after taking a look at the photo of the bridge being dismantled, has anyone heard whether this bridge is being restored for reuse or is it being removed completely? It looks like someone does have the heart to take the bridge and relocate it, but not before having restored.

Blackwater River Bridge
Posted January 13, 2010, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This logic sounds similar to my policy that states:

"No deck" is no excuse for not walking on the bridge!

Blackwater River Bridge
Posted January 13, 2010, by J.R. Manning (thekitchenguy [at] sbcglobal [dot] net)

You're right, my friend.

Skin grows back. Bones heal. Pants and jackets can be stitched.

Sheet metal has to be straightened then painted, and both camera bodies and glass are expensive.

Not to mention, it's tough to get tack sharp pics with cracked glass so you'd have to go back later. Sacrifice the body and save the equipment!

Blackwater River Bridge
Posted January 13, 2010, by Todd (mrwalk08 [at] aol [dot] com)

I applaud that motto too. The more "dedicated bridge lovers" the better.

Blackwater River Bridge
Posted January 13, 2010, by Sharon Spear (sweetsexysharon [at] gmail [dot] com)

I agree with your motto Anthony!

Blackwater River Bridge
Posted January 13, 2010, by Anthony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Never said I was faint of heart J.R.!!

I fell on my A** like 3 times getting pics of High Banks being dismantled! The road had been ripped out and there was ice everywhere......could have used some skates.

My motto is "sacrifice the body.....save the camera"

Blackwater River Bridge
Posted January 12, 2010, by Sharon Spear (sweetsexysharon [at] gmail [dot] com)

My first "bridge hunt" was in 15* weather. Sure, it was cold! I had been to the bridge before and knew that during warmer weather it was so over grown that shooting it would be more difficult.

http://bridgehunter.com/mo/st-charles/bh39088/

But I like to eagle watch along the Mississippi River flyway too. Last Saturday the temps were in the single digits and the river was jammed with ice.

I do agree that you have to dress warm and take care of your camera.

Blackwater River Bridge
Posted January 12, 2010, by J.R. Manning (thekitchenguy [at] sbcglobal [dot] net)
Blackwater River Bridge
Posted January 12, 2010, by Anthony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Winter bridgehunting is NOT for the faint of heart.....that's for sure!!

Blackwater River Bridge
Posted January 12, 2010, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I was flying my private jet down to the bridge when my alarm went off and I woke up :)

I have never been a fan of documenting bridges in the winter, despite the lack of foliage obstruction. It doesn't make up for the physical misery of winter, from short battery life and numb fingers to poor road conditions.

Blackwater River Bridge
Posted January 12, 2010, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Great idea Nathan - now which one of us has the most lenient supervisor?

In all seriousness, I was hoping to do some bridgehunting over the holidays, but 15 inches of snow killed those plans might fast!

Blackwater River Bridge
Posted January 11, 2010, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Quit talking and start walking: visit this bridge and report back here with photos on the double!

Blackwater River Bridge
Posted January 11, 2010, by Anthony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I agree James, it looks like the bridge is still there. The road to the Southeast appears to be extant, but the road to the Northwest either runs along the river and is hidden in the trees or has been plowed under.

Blackwater River Bridge
Posted January 10, 2010, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

Now that you mention it, I do see something on the Google satellite view, so perhaps the bridge is still standing. The Missouri historic bridge list suggests the bridge was "destroyed" in 1997, but that obviously can't be right. If still standing, this is a real gem. The Missouri Historic Bridge Inventory (1996) said, "It is among the longest and best-preserved trusses in Missouri: an important example of a now-uncommon structural type."

Blackwater River Bridge
Posted January 10, 2010, by J Lance

Has this bridge been confirmed to be lost? It was still there in 2002, although it had been abandoned for several years.