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Posted January 15, 2019, by Luke

NBI only refers to it as a stringer, and location was a guess by James.

Posted January 15, 2019, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Trusses removed? Referring to original listing info.....

Posted January 15, 2019, by Daniel

updated *and* closed to traffic? that's disappointing.

have any pictures of the "update"?

Posted January 15, 2019, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Bit disappointing, good hike down old right of way, old bridge has been "updated", and closed to thru traffic

Posted January 15, 2019, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Thanks, Tony

Posted January 14, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Yup... Looks about ca. 1900 to me.

Posted January 14, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Seriously love the photos with Snow

Posted January 14, 2019, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Fun, snowy visit today. Age of this thing? c. 1900'ish?

Posted January 14, 2019, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Also, On the rare chance that it was there I checked for a plaque on the east side of the bridge, only thing there was spray painted tonnage marks, could not cross to check west side of bridge

Posted January 14, 2019, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

I would argue that this one should be called " Harbor St. Bridge", I clearly saw this one at the intersection of Harbor and Gondola today, it is a continuation of Harbor street to the west where it crosses the Creek, unless there is a duplicate Warren 3 panel riveted bedstead just north of this spot which I sort of doubt.... possibly pin change south a bit just a tick west of Harbor and Gondola over the Creek

Posted January 9, 2019, by Mark (openarchivestl [at] gmail [dot] com)

Anyone know what year the previous bridge was built in? I had initially mistaken this bridge as that depicted in the Sanborn maps from the early 20th century, but 1925 is way too late for the sanborn map date.

Posted January 8, 2019, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Looking north. The trail is finished from the tunnel into Lee's Summit.

https://www.kshb.com/news/local-news/jackson-county-to-open-...

Posted January 3, 2019, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

A group is working to save this bridge in place, and is seeking donations:

https://greensmillhistoricalbridge.com/

Posted January 2, 2019, by Kyle Fowler (02nails [at] gmail [dot] com)

I can confirm this is a private road. My friends owns the property near the second bridge. The second bridge has fallen, but the pillars remain. If someone was interested in investigating further, I could probably convince him to let me show you around.

Posted January 1, 2019, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The current deck is new and appears to have been built over the original deck using two wide flange deck girders. This raises the trail a foot or two above the rest of the grade.

Posted December 30, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

NBI data belongs to larger bridge to the SW,

Posted December 30, 2018, by Sean (sean at normalfam [dot] com)

We walked through this the other day. Would be pretty cool if they turn it into a bike trail.

https://normalfam.com/index.php/2018/12/29/abandoned-tunnel/

Posted December 29, 2018, by Anonymous

This bridge was still passable, although inherently unsafe. when I crossed it in a bus in 1971. By mid to late 1973 the decking was partially removed and it was impassable. Would love to see photos of it in it's heyday!

Iatan Bridge (Missouri)
Posted December 28, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This bridge is NOT demolished and I am unsure what the 2002 date refers to. It is clearly visible in images on Google.

Posted December 27, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The 1956 rehab was probably a total replacement.

Posted December 27, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Early '80s topo shows this as Burlington Northern.

Posted December 26, 2018, by Daniel Barnes

CNW System Maps show the line through Savannah was removed between 1981 & 1985

Posted December 26, 2018, by Luke
Posted December 17, 2018, by Jack Schmidt (jjturtle [at] earthlink [dot] net)

This bridge is now listed under free bridges with MODOT

https://www.modot.org/historic-bridge-gasconade-river-bridge

Hugo Bridge (Missouri)
Posted December 15, 2018, by Sean

Gone

Posted December 5, 2018, by Luke

Looks like a Post to me.

According to railfans, the MKT built to Hannibal in 1873, and they were leased by the MoPac from 1880-1888.

http://www.missouri-central.railfan.net/history1.html

Posted December 5, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

FWIW, The 1890 quad shows it as Mo Pacific.

Posted December 5, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The truss on the new is a Warren while the old bridge looks like a Pratt.

Posted December 4, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Finally found a map showing the mill location and what looks like a pier.

Posted December 4, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Beautiful

Mason Bridge (Missouri)
Posted December 4, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)
Posted November 24, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Clark,

Certainly not the worst condition Iíve ever seen a structure in, but also not a good sign. A lot of structures on the KC-Roodhouse IL route were built about the same time.

Posted November 24, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The Lassig just RR west is 1900 so this one should be as old. This one seems to have suffered from corrosion more than the truss.

Posted November 24, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Clark,

Only one year off on the date! My 1979 track profile lists a fabrication date of 1898 and an erection date of 1899. I have updated accordingly.

Posted November 24, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

I moved the pin to a crossing shown on the 1938 topo. Is this a double intersection Warren?

Posted November 17, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Dana,

In an earlier picture posted, you can see members for the replacement bridge of this wooden truss. I would guess these pics were from the mid 1890s.

Posted November 17, 2018, by dana

Other one

Posted November 17, 2018, by Dana

George John Art, River profile appears different of course that can change over 100 years or so.

Posted November 17, 2018, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

John,I think James Baughn found the previous bridge that was located here by the picture he found on ebay.The location is Gault,Missouri which i think makes it the bridge mentioned.Of course I could be wrong.

Posted November 16, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I'm guessing this girder bridge replaced an older steel truss. Other parts of this Milwaukee Road mainline between Davenport, Iowa and Kansas City were upgraded through the 1930s and 1940s. I would estimate that the previous metal truss bridge was probably built in the 1890s, when major upgrades of the line occurred according to Milwaukee Road annual reports. The wooden bridge probably dates to 1881, when the railroad built through Galt.

Posted November 16, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

James wondered about this crossing the other day. Wasn't sure

Posted November 15, 2018, by Luke

Dakota, Minnesota & Eastern (Now technically Canadian Pacific, but there's rumours of the DM&E coming back) And it's a TPG.

Posted November 11, 2018, by Neil Krout (kickinpony [dot] 66 [at] gmail [dot] com)

As of 11/11/2018 bridge is closed. There is a large snag of logs on the West side of the bridge. I didn't venture out onto the bridge to see if it was damaged or not.

Posted November 9, 2018, by Greg Albers (gjalbers777 [at] gmail [dot] com)

If this is the same bridge referred to in this article, both drivers did not survive as Scott remembers.

http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2015/jun/10/40-years-ago-lawren...

Posted November 6, 2018, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Tony, what are your feeling on Luke's suggestion that all examples of this truss style were products of one of the two Pan American Bridge Companies? I've never associated a builder with the Powers Highway Bridge in Michigan. Exact details vary, specifically, some bridges of this style include built-up lifting holes for installation equipment/cranes.

Posted November 5, 2018, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Likely from the lesser known Pan American Bridge Company of Moberly, Missouri and not my hometown Pan American Bridge Company of New Castle, Indiana. The Missouri firm actually took it's name from the older Indiana firm, who also supplied some of the trusses for the fledgling company.

Posted November 5, 2018, by Luke

I'm glad I found a rarity, and I can only hope the towing/wrecking company that seems to own it now leaves it be.

Posted November 5, 2018, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Simple Lattice pony I would say. I have heard the more unique Canton ones referred to as a "Lattice Girder".

Posted November 5, 2018, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

These were very common in Missouri. There were 33 of them at the time of Fraser's historic bridge inventory in the early 1990s (see attached).

The inventory called them "lattice bedsteads", which as Nathan points out on his website, is not really accurate. They were lumped together with other true bedstead truss types, which were so common at the time in Missouri that very few were considered National Register eligible.

I don't know offhand how many of these "lattice" bridges are left, but it can't be very many. True bedsteads have also dwindled: what was once the most common truss type in Missouri is now one of the rarest.

Posted November 4, 2018, by Luke

This bridge bears an eerie resemblance to a relocated one I discovered in Iowa: https://bridgehunter.com/ia/muscatine/bh79331/

And while seeing if other examples existed in Missouri, I came across an entry that led me to this page on Nathan's site: https://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=m...

I have a feeling that spans of this specific style were primarily a Pan American Bridge Co. product.

I've emailed Nathan about it and hope he reaffirms my suspicions.

Posted November 1, 2018, by Trista Roberts (robertstrista [at] yahoo [dot] com)

We called this the Z bridge because of the way the road went on either side of it and the side rails started with the roads. In the 90's my church (Six Mile Baptist) always had hay rides in the fall and we went over it. We always stopped and anyone who didn't want to ride on the trailer could get off and walk across. When I was learning to drive in 95', I missed my turn taking the back way to church. My dad said, "Don't worry, there is another way to go." I kept driving and we came up on the Z bridge. I had an 88' AMC Eagle station wagon. My dad would not let me get out of driving over it since I missed my turn. I will never forget that.

Posted October 31, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Once again, well done Luke.

Posted October 31, 2018, by Luke
Posted October 31, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Topo maps show the road going beneath the RR so I imagine this is a "tunnel" or culvert.

The 1943 Berryman 15' map does not show this rail. Looking at the bridge to the west it seems likely that this crossing was built in the last 75 years. Did the railroad not come to Steelville until that late?

Posted October 22, 2018, by Pam Wilson Martin (Pammartin68 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I remember with fondness the many summers spent at Camp Pin Oak as a Girl Scout. In the summer of 1965 our senior scout Unit 5 took a 60 mile canoe trip. The highlight of our trip was all 18 of us beaching our canoes and walking across the bridge via the catwalk which was suspended from beneath the bridge. Not sure this was allowed, but oh what fun that special summer!

Posted October 20, 2018, by Jeremy Ruble (saukee0 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

A lot of local folks are taking interest in this bridge since I started this project. When the road commissioner calls me back with the verification I will talk more with him on the structural intergity of the bridge and if there are any hopes in saving it.

Posted October 20, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Jeremy may have reopened hope for this one. It looks too big for an easy (relatively) relocation. Anyone imagine a scenario where this bridge is savable in situ? NRHP seems like a place to start.

Posted October 19, 2018, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

I went back through my archives and found an email I received in 2005 from a worker at the Pike County road & bridge department. He asked me if there was anything that could be done about saving this bridge. At that time, he expected that the county would leave the bridge as-is until it eventually collapsed and had to be fished out of the river.

Fortunately we haven't reached that last stage yet.

Posted October 19, 2018, by Jeremy Ruble (saukee0 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Iím not really sure. When the road commissioner verifys with the county clerk and call me back I will ask him about this.

Posted October 19, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

If the county owns it, what does that mean for the chance of recognition and preservation?

Posted October 14, 2018, by Gary Dyhouse (friscogary [at] yahoo [dot] com)

You can photograph this bridge as it is not in Fort Leonard Wood itself

Posted October 13, 2018, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Jeremy, your photo of the bridge through the weeds is Beautiful !

Posted October 12, 2018, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Looks like a pony truss

Posted October 12, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I've found the best strategy is to ask. I can't honestly recall ever being turned down, and more often than not the people are more than happy to talk about "their" bridge. There's a number of bridges where I've withheld pictures for a period of time, particularly to avoid ruffling the feathers of anyone who may object.

Posted October 12, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

It's pretty common for plowing to encroach on public rights of way. Rural folks (I was once among them) actively discourage people from coming around their property due to the ease with which thefts can occur in isolated areas. The county highway department has the legally correct information on where the public can freely travel.

You don't need a plat book. The online GIS and a verification call to the county should get accurate information.

Posted October 12, 2018, by Jeremy Ruble (saukee0 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

The road to this bridge on the west side has been completely removed and is now a corn field. You have to walk up the hill to get to it. The woman chewed me out on Facebook and said she is reporting it to the owner. I will be obtaining a plat book to do more research. For now I would just stay away. Also the road is currently under weather to it.

Posted October 12, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

I've seen occasional mistakes due to slow updates, but it might be worth a call to the county to verify ownership. Their GIS shows this bridge and roadway as county property.

https://maps.camavision.com/pikemo?pin=010930000000005000

Posted October 11, 2018, by Zeke Clawson (Rclawson [at] sbuniv [dot] edu)

Bridge is now only accessible from the west. The road on the east is closed and returned to nature.

Posted October 6, 2018, by C. Siman (absaroka6 [at] att [dot] net)

The wooden span is being replaced with a steel span of the same design. 5 Oct 2018.

Posted September 26, 2018, by Sharon Spear (sweetsexysharon [at] gmail [dot] com)

On 9-29-17, we stopped to take pictures before the worked continued to pull the bridge out of the river. On 9-22-18, we stopped to take pictures and were surprised. Someone, I don't know who, built a tribute to the old bridge.

http://www.pbase.com/sharonmsphotos/bruns_bridge

Posted September 25, 2018, by Don Baker (thefiddlepicker [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I grew up in F - Town, When I was a kid we used to walk from Fredericktown to the city lake on the RR Tracks, Their was another small RR trussel between the lake & town, On one side under the tracks was a big opening on the town side It was made by the RR, We had to climb a rope to get into it, I never knew what it was for, But it was about 8 feet wide 20 feet long & 20 feet high,,??? Do you know what this was for?

Posted September 14, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Different RR shown in the same book. The 1887 Independence topo shows C&A so I'm going to have to write it off as an error in the index map.

Posted September 14, 2018, by Don Morrison

If you go to the township 49, range 31 map of the same North West Publishing Company Atlas of Jackson County 1904, it does say Chicago and Alton crossing the Little Blue at Selsa Station.

http://www.historicmapworks.com/Map/US/61179/Township+49+N++...

Missouri pacific is farther north.

An error on the mapmaker's part?

Posted September 12, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

A puzzle for the rail fans: The North West Publishing Company Atlas of Jackson County 1904 shows this as the Missouri Pacific.

http://www.historicmapworks.com/Map/US/61154/Jackson+County+...

Posted September 11, 2018, by Laci Baker (lacibwiggins [at] gmail [dot] com)

Bridge at Camp

Posted September 11, 2018, by Laci Baker (lacibwiggins [at] gmail [dot] com)

Found this photo dated August 1925

Posted September 7, 2018, by Fmiser (fmiser [at] gmail [dot] com)

I drove past today... and the new bridge is open and the old one is - gone.

This is a location that really did need a wider bridge suitable for heavier loads - but it is so sad to see the old one just destroyed. Missouri sure seems to be intent on eliminating all historic bridges.

Posted September 6, 2018, by Fmiser (fmiser [at] gmail [dot] com)

A friend tipped me off to an article about this bridge in a magazine called "Rural Missouri"

http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/ruralmissouri/201807/index.p...

It's a fair article. Not much technical data, but what's there seems to be accurate. Mostly it focuses on a local resident who is intent on saving the bridge from demolition when the new bridge is done.

Posted September 2, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

I'm told it was taken back to have the parts rebuilt and reused. I'm not sure who will own them.

Posted September 1, 2018, by Gerald Hart

Visited this bridge today and it was gone.

Posted September 1, 2018, by Luke

The style of postcard is mid 1900s, and already shows riveted connections vs the pinned connections prominent in 1890s bridge construction.

So this isn't an 1891 bridge, but it likely replaced one, so I'll make up an entry for it.

Posted September 1, 2018, by Rich Kaduce (rkaduce [at] outlook [dot] com)

I think there is picture of the bridge (circa 1900) on the Mississippi River and Bonnterre Railroad wiki website. As for the riveted connections I'm sure the bridge has been upgraded to handle modern traffic.

Posted August 31, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I would estimate this to be an early 1900s bridge. It is a lighter structure than later riveted trusses, but it still shows features of the 20th century. It is possible it was set onto older stone substructures, which could have been built in 1891.

Posted August 31, 2018, by Anonymous

I see riveted connections, which means it's probably later than 1891.

Posted August 31, 2018, by Rich Kaduce (rkaduce [at] outlook [dot] com)

A 1904 USGS map shows this bridge was on the Mississippi River and Bonnterre Railroad line. The bridge was built in 1891.

Cherry Dip (Missouri)
Posted August 29, 2018, by Leslie Davis (ausrakay [at] hotmail [dot] com)

After checking the map you provided, the location you have is not of the bridge the locals called Cherry Dip. You have located the "low water" crossing that used to be on Byars road. That location was South of High Grove. Cherry Dip was a few miles North. Cherry Dip was maybe closer to Ruskin. The bridge was also on Food Lane. The road changes from Byars Road to Food Lane at Harry S. Truman Drive. Cherry Dip was north of that location. The creek it crossed doesn't have a name that I am aware of.

The link provided shows the original location of Cherry Dip. Part of the reason it got that name was because of the road name "Food Lane". It was "Cherry Dip on Food Lane". Classic!

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Byars+Rd,+Grandview,+MO+64...

Posted August 29, 2018, by Leslie Davis (ausrakay [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The pictures on this page are not of Cherry Dip on Byars road. The road is still in use and the original "cherry dip" was removed. The photos show a road barrier and a creek bed. Not part of Cherry Dip.

I grew up in that area and crossed that bridge MANY times. It was a local icon that was involved in many accidents.

Posted August 29, 2018, by Leslie Davis (ausrakay [at] hotmail [dot] com)

After more checking the map provided the location you have it not of the bridge the locals called Cherry Dip. You have located the "low water" crossing that used to be on Byars road and that location was South of High Grove. Cherry Dip was a few miles North. Cherry Dip was maybe closer to Ruskin. The bridge was also on Food Lane. The road changes from Byars Road to Food Lane at Harry S. Truman Drive. Cherry Dip was north of that location. The creek it crossed doesn't have a name that I am aware of.

The link provided shows the original location of Cherry Dip. Part of the reason it got that name was because of the road name "Food Lane". It was "Cherry Dip on Food Lane". Classic!

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Byars+Rd,+Grandview,+MO+64...

Posted August 29, 2018, by Leslie Davis (ausrakay [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The pictures on this page are not of Cherry Dip on Byars road. The road is still in use and the original "cherry dip" was removed. The photos show a road barrier and a creek bed. Not part of Cherry Dip.

I grew up in that area and crossed that bridge MANY times. It was a local icon that was involved in many accidents.

Posted August 26, 2018, by Anonymous (tillerman61 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Bridge to be replaced in 2019.

Posted August 26, 2018, by David Huffman (davhuffm [at] mndsprng [dot] com)

Bridge will be closed for one year for repairs.

https://fox2now.com/2018/08/26/martin-luther-king-bridge-clo...

Posted August 19, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The 1903/13 15' quad shows a single track. In 1945 there is a double track. Probably the original single track used the stone piers, the second track went on the concrete extensions, then the original track was scrapped at some time later than 1945. The 1954 7.5' shows the double track ending at Times Beach just before the bridge and a single track continuing toward St. Louis.

Posted August 19, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

To me, it appears that the existing bridge was added onto an older deck truss that used the double track piers. The old deck truss probably was 30 years or so older than the current truss, and was probably removed when the double track was no longer necessary.

Posted August 19, 2018, by Remick Bloss (remickbl [at] gmail [dot] com)

I was just getting ready to ask why this bridge was not double-tracked at the outset. I mean, the builders built the piers for a double-track bridge.

Posted August 19, 2018, by owen mcnamee (soapmanii [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Drove down the Backbone sometime in the early 60s when i was in my 20s going from rock to rock and through gullys in the gravel. Scary then and I sure would not want to do it at 80 As I recall there were still some boards in place then.

Posted August 18, 2018, by David Sears (searsd [at] merrimack [dot] edu)

I visited this bridge in the spring of 1973 when it was on dry land. I have two black and white photographs taken at that time.

Posted August 14, 2018, by Luke

There's a small, unnamed ditch on the west end of town that empties into Hickory near the RV park.

Stream width based on streetview seems to fit the bill, although the house in the background no longer seems to exist.

Posted August 14, 2018, by Carl Stclair (stclaircarl [at] gmail [dot] com)

my dad built a copy of this bridge for his model railroad layout in HO scale.

Posted August 13, 2018, by Eric Kinkhorst (erick [dot] bud [at] gmail [dot] com)

I ride on this bridge all the time. It's neat old stretch of 65.

Posted August 13, 2018, by Curtis Hudson

It's a shame beautiful pieces of history such as this one are removed, although it's nice the approach was saved to be used as a memorial.