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Posted May 25, 2017, by K. Allen Ballard (speedeeprint [at] gmail [dot] com)

Visited here May 9th, 2017; didn't have a lot of time to spend and left my boots at home so I couldn't go 'feet wet' to center up on the bridge and get the upstream side. Another time.....I'm only 40 minutes away.

Posted May 24, 2017, by Sharon Spear (sweetsexysharon [at] gmail [dot] com)

On April 16th we were out taking photos and we stopped so I could get photos of the old bridge. Little did I know what would happen to the bridge on May 1st! We returned on May 19th and I took photos of the wreckage. I didn't want to post them on this page so as not to spoil the beauty of the old bridge. I have posted both the "beauty shots" and the "wreckage shots" to my PBase page at this link:

http://www.pbase.com/sharonmsphotos/bruns_bridge

Avert Bridge (Missouri)
Posted May 21, 2017, by Zach Smith (zsmith [at] roaddogind [dot] com)

is this bridge still for sale or bid???

Posted May 20, 2017, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

This was a wild goose chase. Information and photos at this link suggested this was a functioning replica Holland-style drawbridge:

http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WMFG03_Story_Woods_Draw_B...

It, however, has been replaced by a boring non-artistic footbridge.

Posted May 19, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Just be glad that this bridge has such a beam. Not all bridges have them.

Posted May 19, 2017, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

Yes, that floor beam is the only thing keeping this bridge upright. But it could easily fail at any time.

Posted May 19, 2017, by Eric Kinkhorst (erick [dot] bud [at] gmail [dot] com)

Not even a bridge.

Posted May 18, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

It appears to me that the floor beam underneath the end posts is the only thing that is keeping this bridge from collapsing. That floor beam is allowing this Pratt truss to remain standing as a three-legged bridge for now.

Posted May 18, 2017, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

Field visit today: I'm not sure how this bridge is still standing. There's almost nothing supporting the southwest endpost.

Posted May 18, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nick:

That sounds like a reasonable estimation. This bridge appears to be constructed with riveted connections. Rivets began to fall out of favor in the years after WWII as bolted and welded connections became popular.

Posted May 18, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

20's to early 40's it's looking like?

Posted May 17, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is a rare example of a Pratt - Warren Hybrid. There was another example in Johnson County Kansas, but it has been replaced.

Posted May 17, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Neat one - just on northern border of sleepy little RR town

Posted May 16, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I have been wondering if it was still somewhat intact, albeit undoubtedly mangled.

Posted May 16, 2017, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

Field check today: the wreckage is still in the water. The river is still high so only a portion is visible. It's hard to imagine how much water it took to push this bridge off the abutments.

Posted May 16, 2017, by Michael G.

Yes, this bridge is still at its location as of 5/16/17.

Posted May 11, 2017, by Kim Andereck (kim [dot] andereck [at] gmail [dot] com)

As a student at nearby Culver-Stockton College in the mid- to late-1960's, this site was simply known as "The Bus." It was often the rendezvous point for fraternity parties, beer guzzlers, makeout artists and their girlfriends. The floorboards of the old bridge rattled and rumbled whenever a vehicle crossed over the Wyaconda River.

Posted May 11, 2017, by M Cox (trock859[at]yahoo[dot]com)

Yes! Another UCEB gone! 😏😀

Posted May 7, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

This one, like so many others in the several-mile abandoned- RR stretch alongside "Old 71" is in rough shape, but a fun visit. Tick season is officially on (never ended?)....pulled off 3 on my leg heading north after this quick visit....

Posted May 7, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Old stone abutment remnants still under both ends. Very scenic spot.

Posted May 7, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Found it today. It lives. And is open to public.

Posted May 7, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

That is my concern as well. With these bridges you have to look underneath. That is where the problems often show up first. I know that the collapse of the Columbia Bridge was a complete an unpleasant surprise for me. I would hate for the folks of Windsor Harbor to have the same unpleasant surprise. I suspect that both of these bridges are / were subject to a slowly developing problem.

Posted May 7, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Let's just hope that precarious footing on the substructure doesn't cause problems! At least it seems to be moving slowly.

Posted May 6, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge is being besieged by backwaters from the Mississippi River.

News article and video which shows the bridge:

https://www.google.com/amp/fox2now.com/2017/05/04/sandbag-le...

Posted May 4, 2017, by LaVon Bitting (Bitting02 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The previous posting about Ball Ford Bridge in Cedar Co. MO is wrong. The bridge was open until 2017, and is closed until repairs can be made. My family has owned the land east of the bridge since 1908.

Posted May 4, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Beautiful structure... Very unique portals with a pseudo-railroad look to them.

Posted May 3, 2017, by sheila ruhl (sruhl [at] usgs [dot] gov)

I believe the location listed for Kampeters Bridge/Kampeters Crossing in Maries Co Mo. T41N R10W Section 30 Inventory # BH36444 is incorrect.

I believe the actual location is:

38 17 59N, 91 59 53W - T41N R10W Section 14 Osage Co. Mo.

Information to support this claim.

In one of the images shown on bridgehunter.com the suspension bridge is crossing the Maries River running perpendicular to an abandoned rr track known as the Rock Island RR. Ariel imagery at 38 17 59N, 91 59 53W, dated 3/30/2015, reveals support piers that would support a suspension bridge on each side of the Maries River. The bridge crossed the Maries River from east to west crossing the Rock Island RR on the west side of the Maries River. This was known as Kampeters Trail North East of Argyle Mo. Also there are no tracks running along the Maries River in Maries Co. Missouri

I hope you investigate and correct the location of Kampeters bridge on bridgehunter.com

Posted May 3, 2017, by David Huffman (davhuffm [at] mindspring [dot] com)

We are going to get 3 to 5 more inches of rain here in the St Louis area by Friday morning. So more bridges could get taken out.

Posted May 2, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Well, for those keeping score at home this makes at least two truss bridges in Missouri destroyed by the storm. Hopefully this will be it. At least one modern (ie post 1970) steel stringer was destroyed, so it's not just trust bridges that are susceptible to flooding.

Posted May 2, 2017, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Here is a news article on destruction of this bridge by flooding. http://www.ktts.com/news/local-news/bridges-gone-after-flood...

Posted May 2, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Here is the bridge being destroyed.

https://twitter.com/RaferWeigel/status/859163415998115840

This is the cost of "Do Nothing." This rare bridge should have been relocated, preserved and reused. It was one of the oldest and most unique of its type in the area. States like Indiana have a bridge management plan to address bridges like this. Missouri in contrast has a horrible preservation track record. State policy is just as much to blame here as Mother Nature.

Posted May 1, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yes, I hope that we don't lose any others in this flooding event. One bridge collapse is bad enough. This entire multi-state region still has quite a few abandoned trusses, but that number drops with every major flood.

Posted May 1, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Sad news indeed!

Sounds like the old girl had survived historic floods in the past. Guess it was just time for Mother Nature to have the final say! I just hope this is our only loss!

Posted May 1, 2017, by Kris glass (Krisglass1986 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Pics are 30 mins before it was takin by the flood lots of memories here all we can hope for now is it gets cleaned up for all of us who enjoy this stretch of river every summer in our boats.

Posted May 1, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)
Posted May 1, 2017, by Michael G.

Hard to believe this old bridge is now gone. I grew up close to it and crossed it hundreds of times as a kid. Anyone growing up in this area, as well as the surrounding areas, knew of this bridge. It was a long lasting landmark for so many...for so long. Will have many fun memories of this, the last truss bridge in this area.

Posted May 1, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)
Posted May 1, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

What a tragic loss. I was afraid that Missouri, Arkansas, and perhaps Oklahoma would lose some bridges in this event.

This flooding illustrates why I am comfortable with restored bridges being moved off of active rivers and placed over nearby smaller creeks, ponds, or drainage ditches. Likewise, I am in favor of them being raised and placed on taller, wider, and sturdier pylons.

The collapse of this bridge represents a terrible loss of a great historic resource. I wish that I could have seen it in person. Thanks for letting us know about this collapse. I will update the page to reflect your information.

Posted May 1, 2017, by Nick L

Bruns' Bridge was washed away during major flooding on May 1, 2017.

Posted May 1, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Looks like a 7-panel Pratt... Nice find CV!

Posted April 30, 2017, by Anonymous

it does look unique.

It can be seen in Bing rotated 180 degrees. looks like Hwy V used to T into Rock road, but they just put in a curve and abandoned the bridge.

Posted April 30, 2017, by Don Morrison

Wow.

No visible traces of the road to it either. Bing shows a Lumber Lane that probably connected long ago.

Nice find.

Love mystery bridges.

"Oh I wish I had a pencil thin mustache

Then I could solve some mysteries too"

Posted April 30, 2017, by Brent Shocklee (shocklee [at] yhti [dot] net)

Would love to know more about this bridge

Posted April 30, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge had the same portal bracing as a group of much older railroad Pratt trusses in southeast Kansas. It does not look like anything that I would expect on a 1940s bridge. It makes me wonder if this one was relocated.

Posted April 30, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This looks like a lightweight Pratt. Great find! It is always nice when a complete mystery bridge shows up.

Posted April 28, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Looks like a very strong possibility John! Definitely the same fabricator and overall appearance. Reasonable distance from the Iowa location to seem feasible as well. Good detective work my friend!

Posted April 27, 2017, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I found a possible former location for this bridge. It appears that it could have been moved from here:

http://bridgehunter.com/ia/wapello/bh76800/

This rail line was constructed in 1899, and the bridge is an exact match in terms of dimensions. In addition, the article on the Iowa page makes note of the spans being relocated to other locations.

Thoughts?

Posted April 23, 2017, by Jeff DeWitt (JeffDeWitt [at] nc [dot] rr [dot] com)

I visited the bridge in 2006 on a REALLY windy day. I parked on the Mo. side and while I didn't have any problems I didn't get a good feeling about the area. I probably would have stayed on the bridge longer but I was nervous about leaving my car unattended.

I put together a YouTube about my visit.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XFYU1SBfY68

Posted April 23, 2017, by John (johntherogger [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is actually the KCCS line, which was sold to Frisco who combined it with their existing line formally known as the "Blair Line".

The Blair ran from Belton near KC through Harrisonville, LaTour, Clinton and bounced by the KCCS all the way until just north of here where the Blair continued south to Springfield and the KCCS went west to connect in Ash Grove.

When Frisco bought them both, they combined sections of the KCCS and their line and made the "highline", then abandoned portions of both the Blair and the KCCS where they didn't need access anymore.

Finally Frisco abandoned the whole thing in favor of the Truman Lake. Too much money for the amount of bridges needed and they could run trains through the Fort Scott branch into Springfield.

Fun facts:

1. President Harry Truman rode on this line before it was closed

2. Ash Grove is where the connection from Fort Scott is, ironically, considering they abandoned that section!

3. The KCCS had a nickname too, "Leaky Roof", because it was so cheap and the cars hardly ever carried anything but clay, so the roof's leaked. It angered a local Flour farmer because his flour would get wet, so he hauled the flour by tractor to the competitor line to have it shipped!

Posted April 23, 2017, by John (johntherogger [at] gmail [dot] com)

Any chance this is the old highway bridge, prior to the widening of 13 and the arch bridge? Or could this bridge be one of the two Railroad Bridges that would have crossed here? KCCS or Blair Line?

Posted April 23, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

An expansion joint on this bridge recently received emergency repairs:

https://youtu.be/QnnB7AJam38

Posted April 23, 2017, by Carey Fry (kitwings [at] sandwich [dot] net)

I finally made it down there a couple years ago after two previous attempts failed due to "road" conditions and loose cattle. Had to park about a mile up and walk, nearly lost a boot in the mud but was mad enough by then to keep going. Thank you for update re: railroad bridge, cleared some things up for me.

Posted April 20, 2017, by Kurt (richeson [at] htc [dot] net)

The bridge is private and gated. Access is only available by owner invitation or during an event at the abandoned mine. The facility has been closed since the mine flooded in Dec 2015 / Jan 2016. Private events have been scheduled for mid 2017.

Photo taken Feb 20, 2017.

Posted April 19, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I second Nathan's comment about the quality of the photographs. These are great images. I just wish that they depicted trusses, etc.

I suspect that Missouri has plenty of trusses that need quality documentation. This website relies heavily on locals with knowledge of bridges in their area. We just need to let the UCEBs be UCEBs and concentrate on the good stuff.

Posted April 19, 2017, by Dave King (DKinghawkfan [at] hotmail [dot] com)

There has been quite a few modern eyesores posted recently that don't belong on this site

Posted April 19, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I am actually genuinely confused. I thought maybe all these bridges were going to turn out to be an elaborate April Fools joke. But they keep coming long after. I honestly am curious why these bridges are being posted. The photos are nice, well-composed, and professional looking. The culverts themselves (not bridges) are somewhat less than remarkable to be polite about it.

Posted April 19, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Not my comment...

But yes, posting these bridges on Uglybridges would be appropriate. Uglybridges serves a good purpose as a log of modern bridges of all types - plus I think you can access historic bridges posted on Bridgehunter if you are logged into Uglybridges. Whether you like historic bridges, or UCEBS, Uglybridges gives you the best of both worlds.

Posted April 19, 2017, by Matt Lohry

I would have to agree with...um...whoever it is. This is a better entry for uglybridges.com...plain concrete culverts really don't belong here.

Posted April 19, 2017, by Tony, Jimmy, and/or Robert who may or may not be from Kansas

I'm adding my ass to this site. It's been far long enough without a special "Butts of Bridgehunter" section. Our posteriors are modern and/or historic. I'd wager we all find something notable about and they probably look better than this recent contribution here.

Posted April 19, 2017, by Luke

The geological formation is referred to as Pikes Peak.

Posted April 19, 2017, by Ryan Freeland (ryan [dot] freeland1980 [at] gmail [dot] com)

When you say Pikes Peak, are you talking about Pikes Peak Ocean to Ocean Highway?

Posted April 17, 2017, by Prima Vera Angelhair
Posted April 13, 2017, by Rich Kaduce (rkaduce [at] outlook [dot] com)

An 1898 plat book of Daviess County by North West Publishing shows on page 11 that the only bridge across the Grand River near Gallatin was at (39.9311N,93.9447W).

Posted April 6, 2017, by Richard Schott (stjorickster [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge hasn't been used for many decades. My father born in 1959 said that the parkway has been the route it currently is as far back as he can remember. Old maps show route 8 which is now U.S. 36 crossing the parkway then. No details show whether it intersected or crossed over the parkway.

Posted April 6, 2017, by Kelly McClanahan

Even though I added two better street views, this is just a run of the mill UCB voided slab bridge. The only real memory I have is I was on it, when the 442 TFW the KC A-10's left Grandview and moved to Whiteman AFB. It closed sometime in the early 1990's (1993-4) give or take. I used to use this road/ bridge when I was delivering pizza, as a shortcut and having to avoid traffic at 87th St.

Posted April 3, 2017, by Bink Schmidt

I suggest we construct onsite a ten smoot high monument to this addition, Edvard Munch's "The Scream" figure but with the likeness of a Bridgehunter, the pride of Kansas' Mr. Robert Elder perhaps?

Posted April 2, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

This is in the NBI through 2004 where it's first shown as closed.

Posted April 2, 2017, by Anonymous

Those are how I mark duplicate builders so James knows to delete them. Forgot to delete them after adding the non-duplicate builders

Posted April 1, 2017, by Richard Schott (stjorickster [at] gmail [dot] com)

It's hard to see but in the very first picture there is a vehicle down the road. You can faintly see the overflow bridge which was the one believed to have been located for the riverwalk project. I can't find any literature on that particular bridge. I do remember watching them lift the entire bridge and setting it down off the side of the road, where it sat for some time until it was relocated.

Posted April 1, 2017, by Richard Schott (stjorickster [at] gmail [dot] com)

The security cameras are in place in conjunction with kcpl as it is a vulnerable access to the power plant. I've worked at the plant many times for the union and this is the backstory from the plant manager. It's government required as it's part of power grid infrastructure. Next time I'm at the plant i will get an elevated picture of the bridge from the plant.

Posted April 1, 2017, by Anonymous

.2456140351 smoot rare in this lenght

Posted March 30, 2017, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I was surprised to not see a single contractor or engineer listed on this website (or any other) for this large monumental bridge. It took me some digging, but I found the many engineers and contractors listed in a newspaper article from the grand opening. I have added these, and you can learn more on my new page for this bridge too http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=mi...

Of note, Charles Ellis was one of the several engineers involved with the design of this bridge, although he died before the bridge was completed. Ellis is of course the engineer who did the vast majority of design engineering for the Golden Gate Bridge.

Posted March 30, 2017, by Kelly McClanahan

The 83rd St I-435 Bridge is supposed to come down 4/7/17. It was closed sometime in the early 1990's, the the KCS bridge being removed in 2011.

Posted March 29, 2017, by Dan Hass (danhass1234 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The bridge has had the railroad tie decking removed, so now it has just steel i-beams and is cut off at each end by fence. Looking east across the bridge in winter you can see the tunnel of the Hamburg Trail which goes under Hwy 94.

I took these pictures in March, 2017.

Posted March 29, 2017, by Bill Peters (odolaas69 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Another find job of finding a bridge not in the NBI.

Posted March 28, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Homer Simpson viewed this bridge...

Posted March 28, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] mysterycorals [dot] com)

The bridge is on Lincoln County Line, and happens to be listed in Lincoln County which is why you may have missed it in the NBI. The NBI Number is 3412. The continuous steel stringer bridge with AASHTO girder approach spans was constructed in 1985, and appears to be supported by concrete bents built at the same time as the superstructure (meaning not from a previous bridge). The bridge thus appears to be of typical modern construction throughout. Is there some significance to this bridge that I am missing?

Posted March 28, 2017, by Anonymous (odolaas69 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Not list in the NBI for some reason

Posted March 27, 2017, by Rich Kaduce (rkaduce [at] outlook [dot] com)

The bridge was built 1923 by the Southwest Engineering and Construction Company at cost of $60,444.51.

Ref. Centennial History of Grundy County Missouri 1839-1939

by William Ray Denslow. Page 139

Posted March 27, 2017, by Anonymous

The Trenton Bridge was just south of the city over the old Grand River channel. It was built in 1870 by Smith Truss Bridge Company at cost of $9,000 dollars. Iron piers were added later at cost of $1,800. (40.066N ,93.621W). The bridge was repaired 1877 which the 1881 source cited. There was a major flood in 1909 that moved the county to straighten the river channel. With the completion of the Charlie Dye Bridge in 1923 the channel was changed and the Trenton Bridge was no longer needed. The Trenton Bridge was removed in 1937 and replaced with a concrete culvert. The site of the bridge had been the Benson ferry crossing from 1846 until 1870.

Ref. Centennial History of Grundy County Missouri 1839-1939

by William Ray Denslow. Text Page 139. Bridge Photo Page 35.

Posted March 22, 2017, by Diane L Clark (graciehillfarm [at] juno [dot] com)

How sad that it's just a plain concrete bridge with no character whatsoever. Just another overpass over a little river you can't even notice while driving over it now. Very sad commentary on the history of the area (and it's a very interesting and colorful history, if one bothers to research it). Just so sad that we tear down the past and replace it with drabness.

Posted March 15, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The street view on 15 Mar 17 shows the MO side gated and posted as closed. Seems like a good idea.

Posted March 14, 2017, by J.M.H.

N&W 611 on the bridge in 1983

Posted March 14, 2017, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

Somehow I completely missed the existence of this large Parker through truss even though I've driven through the area many times.

I'm hearing that the bridge has collapsed and there's an urgent need to clear it from the river. But it's unclear who owns the bridge and would be responsible.

If anybody would like to try salvaging a nice 1906-vintage pin-connected truss, here's your chance.

I haven't been able to locate any photos other than the attached Bird's Eye View from Bing.

Posted March 12, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

This one may have been linked to the incorrect NBI information.

Posted March 12, 2017, by jim collier (collier2158 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

KNOW THAT BRIDGE VERY WELL. I LIVED IN DESLOGE FOR 17 YEARS HAD LOT'S OF FUN IN BIG RIVER IT TAKES BE BACK TO THE BEST OF TIME THANKS....

Posted March 11, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Thanks for all you do!

Posted March 11, 2017, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

Yes, that postcard certainly matches the railroad bridge and the old road bridge behind.

Posted March 10, 2017, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hard to describe that instant realization that I was dealing with something special as I rounded the bend. To add some icing to the cake, the bridge is extremely to access. A road from the north is very clearly publicly maintained; and literally dead ends at the field.

Posted March 10, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This is the only (so far) identified rivet-connected Whipple and post-1900 Whipple truss in the United States that I know of. The type is more common in Europe. It is one of the few surviving bridges by Waddell from the brief Waddell and Hedrick era. It is unusual to me that Waddell would designate a Whipple truss in this late period, as he was a proponent of simplicity in truss design.

Posted March 10, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Well, a Webmaster prediction has come true. Somebody has found a Whipple Truss at this location.

I believe that this is the first Whipple truss that I have ever seen that does not have any counters. It is also unusual as a post 1900 Whipple Truss.

Posted March 9, 2017, by Barry Jarrett (barry [at] coffeeprojects [dot] com)

I doubt that abutment is any older than I-270, since that rock was blasted out in the '60s.

It may have been a pier for a power line tower.

Posted March 8, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The Air Line opened between Jan 1891 and Mar 1892. It was built by the man who later founded the Kansas City Southern RR, Arthur Stillwell. http://www.arthurstilwell.com/timeline.html

Posted March 6, 2017, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

Bridge closes March 13 for replacement

Posted March 4, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Nice views of Jeff City Bridge here

Posted March 3, 2017, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

This bridge is currently being rehabilitated.

Posted March 3, 2017, by G. Wright (gwright5150 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Pic of the new bridge and the old bridge

Posted March 3, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

This may be a Whipple.

Posted March 2, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The original RoW followed a less direct route and avoided the river crossings up to 95th St. Parts of the old RoW have been converted to a trail.

Posted March 2, 2017, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

For those wondering, the photos on this article should help illustrate what this bridge's original function was as part of a Dorr Clarifier https://books.google.com/books?id=fwU0AQAAMAAJ&dq=Dorr%20Cla...