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Posted October 12, 2017, by K. Allen Ballard (speedeeprint [at] gmail [dot] com)

My son, Ken, & I visited here Columbus Day, 2017 (09.09.2017). Bridge still very solid, serviceable; on low use county road; located just 1/8 north of Bee Creek Pony Bridge. Picturesque photo ops abound here. We were a bit early for full fall colors.

Posted October 12, 2017, by K. Allen Ballard (speedeeprint [at] gmail [dot] com)

My son, Ken, & I visited here Columbus Day, 2017 (09.09.2017). Bridge still very solid, serviceable; on low use county road; located just 1/8 south of Cedar Bluff Bridge.

Posted October 9, 2017, by Seth Gaines (sethgaines [at] gmail [dot] com)

Doesn't seem to be posted anymore. Easy access if you park on the south end. Deck timbers look pretty good. The boards to drive on are all rotted and a lot are missing, leaving some lovely rusty nails sticking out. You can also get out on the new rail bridge to get a decent shot from the side. That has a pretty solid catwalk. Looks like most of the plaques have been stolen. Only the 'Township Supply' ones at the north end are still there.

Posted October 9, 2017, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Clark,

I agree that it would be nice to have a section for track charts like that. While the IC ones are the nicest and provide build dates; I have quite a collection of midwest railroad charts which other users would likely find helpful.

Posted October 8, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

This looks like the bridge I remember in this location. Jackson County built other open spandrel concrete arches bridges.

1917 http://bridgehunter.com/mo/jackson/gregory-blvd/

1917 http://bridgehunter.com/mo/jackson/troost-avenue/

Longview farm was built between 1913 and 1914.

Posted October 8, 2017, by John Marvig

Clark,

In response to your questions on the C&A bridges, I added the dates as they were listed in a 1970s Illinois Central Gulf track chart. Hope this helps

Posted October 8, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Is there a source on the added build date?

Posted October 8, 2017, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

The bridge appears to be maintained by MoDOT, but it straddles the Missouri-Iowa State Line

Posted October 8, 2017, by Will

This bridge was officially taken down three days ago. I do not know for sure what they're doing with the truss right now.

Posted October 7, 2017, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

Looks like an open spandrel bridge to me.

Posted October 7, 2017, by Anonymous

Kind of a far off shot, but here it is.

Posted October 4, 2017, by John Christeson (john_christeson [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Unfortunately this bridge has been replaced

Posted October 2, 2017, by Dale Dworak (Ddworak1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

We used to walk out to the center pillar along the bottom.

Posted October 2, 2017, by Susan Burns (burns4 [at] grm [dot] net)

Yes this is West Fork Big Creek on CR 436. Sad it's gone, the 1909 flood line was marked on that bridge. The mark was still there in 1993 when a new flood mark was made.

Posted October 1, 2017, by Seth Gaines (sethgaines [at] gmail [dot] com)

Absolute waste of time. If you would like to look at an overgrown culvert, here is your chance. No structure above the road, crosses a weedy ditch, seemed shorter than our little car.

Posted September 30, 2017, by Bill Robinson (modeltt [at] msn [dot] com)

Follow the link - a video of an old Model T Ford crossing the Grand Auglaize Swinging Bridge https://youtu.be/e5VUSWJYan0

Posted September 30, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Odd road bridge? Large, early RR pedestrian-crossing bridge? Brand new homes surround this one on W side, received permission to dive in behind new homeowner's place. Interesting old thing for sure.

Posted September 30, 2017, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

Looking at satellite maps, it looks as if there may be remnants of the bridge footings.

Posted September 28, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I followed the BNSF rail both ways to Rte 19 and MO-49 crossings and see it must be abandoned due to the rail being paved over at route crossings both ways.If this is true then there's a lot of rail abandoned.

Posted September 28, 2017, by Anonymous

Satellite view shows this as a grade crossing, no bridge.

Posted September 26, 2017, by Phil Duff (duffphil [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Bridge Rally

October 7, 2017 at 9:30am at the bridge.

Hard to believe the bridge has been closed a year.

Please join us to share stories, news and new information, if any.

There is a public Facebook invite for this event as well:

https://www.facebook.com/events/1516037185148197/

Posted September 26, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

From the lack of road in the older topo it looks like someone is using a culvert for a creek as a passage for vehicles.

Posted August 29, 2017, by K. Allen Ballard (speedeeprint [at] gmail [dot] com)

There is a duplicate page for this bridge; this is actually CR141, 117 is farther west. Visited here August 21, 2017. Bridge has been completely rebuilt in recent years.

Posted August 26, 2017, by John Marvig

As a civil engineering student, I find the process of replacing it fascinating. Because this line sees a train approximately every 5-10 minutes in this spot, minimizing closures is critical. As a result, the replacement involves constructing the new trusses and switching them out using large platforms.

Posted August 26, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Interesting. Obviously, trusses still have a use in bridge construction today.

Posted August 26, 2017, by John Marvig

Field visited this bridge today. Currently being replaced by a modern truss.

Red Bridge (Missouri)
Posted August 23, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Great flood pictures, John.

Posted August 23, 2017, by Kris (jordegumma [at] comcast [dot] net)

This bridge survived the flooding yesterday morning (8/22/17) even though the more "modern" bridge on 215th St about 100 yards upstream is completely destroyed (a 20-ft-deep chasm). The one on Thorngrove is now probably going to get more traffic until the bridge on the paved road is replaced.

Posted August 16, 2017, by LARRY MURPHY (larrymurf37 [at] gmail [dot] com)

At one time, bridge was a steel through truss. North approach was a timber trestle with about a 16-17 bents. I have a picture of south bound train on the trestle if any one is interested.

Posted August 11, 2017, by K. Allen Ballard (speedeeprint [at] gmail [dot] com)

The southern side abutment just upstream from this bridge is actually the remains of the former St. Louis & Hannibal RR trestle which was abandoned in 1944. Just south of this abutment is the stop/'town' of Jones.

Posted August 5, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Visited this spot today - bridge was replaced by a low-water crossing

Posted August 5, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Visited this spot today - the bridge is long gone - only slightest traces of one abutment survive

Posted August 5, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

There is no bridge at this pinned location

Posted August 4, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This was an awesome bridge! I only drove over it a few times, but it was quite a ride. I never got a chance to photograph it, so I am glad that others did.

Posted August 4, 2017, by Steve

My wife and I moved from West Palm Beach to Minneapolis in 1994. We took a somewhat touristy, indirect route towing our little car with a U-Haul truck. Because of the cumbersome driving I used Interstate Highways more than I prefer to on a cross-country trip (I haven't done many, but a few). I'm glad we chose, on that sunny June morning, the state highway track that led through Lexington and over this bridge. The elegant structure, obviously from another engineering era, evoked nostalgia in me then as a young man, originally from the mid-west and with a natural appreciation for history. I feel nostalgia now, 23 years later, for the bridge, youth, and time now gone -- not a sad sentiment, but instead one both wistful and pleasant.

Posted August 1, 2017, by K. Allen Ballard (speedeeprint [at] gmail [dot] com)

Good pics Rusty. THX for documenting these old bridges.

I recently visited Moniteau Creek bridge in Cole County (closed); it had similar markings as to powder coating in 1964. It was in a little better condition than Ten Mile. Most likely these state route bridges were done this way.

Posted July 31, 2017, by Luke

From what I can see, all of the non-lift spans are riveted/too heavily built to have been built in 1872, so I'm going to say that the whole thing was replaced in 1993:

https://www.dreamstime.com/stock-photo-wabash-bridge-hanniba...

Posted July 29, 2017, by Fmiser (fmiser [at] gmail [dot] com)

Art - you are correct. There were effectively two bridges here using the same substructure. Between 1880 and 1884, he early Finks were replaced with Whipple, the Trellis were also replaced, even the girder approach spans were replaced.

In light of that, I edited the details of this page to reflect the post-1884 bridge and put info on the earlier one on this page:

http://bridgehunter.com/mo/st-charles/nm-missouri-river/

Posted July 29, 2017, by Fmiser (fmiser [at] gmail [dot] com)

I dug a bit deeper and now retract my earlier suggestion to remove this entry. I found that between 1880 and 1884 the entire superstructure was replaced or upgraded. The Fink trusses were replaced with Whipple, and the Trellis were replaced, apparently with new Trellis spans.

Already the bridge is cluttered with whipple and trellis, to have fink too... I choose to make this entry represent the original bridge, with the Fink deck trusses. The other one has details about the newer Whipple spans.

I can't move the photos, but I would suggest that any of them that have the deck truss spans be put on this page leaving only the Whipple on the other page.

I don't know it was the _right_ choice - but it seems to be a logical one.

Posted July 28, 2017, by Jeremy Ruble (saukee0 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Photo number 39 is not of this bridge. Itís a photo of the second train bridge at Quincy Illinois

Posted July 25, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Page 422 in Luke's 22 July link suggests that Tulloch and Missouri Valley worked separately from ABC.

This leaves us with ambiguity about the builder of some of the bridges along this line. The DPG at Elm Branch in Pettis has a 1903 ABC plate, so we know they did some of the work along this western section.

I wonder if the trusses were Tulloch and the plate girders were more of a "phone it in" from ABC.

The plate on this bridge shows Tulloch was Civil Engineer and Contractor. This makes me think ABC should not be listed as a builder.

Some time I'll try to get to the West Sugar Creek Bridge to see if a plate survives. The truss at Haw Creek, although a Warren, may have a plaque as well. If we get enough plaques recorded things may clear up.

Posted July 23, 2017, by Don Morrison

Lol.

It was an attempt at humor. No Ill will intended. Sorry if it was taken wrong. When I'm on mobile, I'm not signed in. Guess I have to type my name to be legit. I understood the meaning, it was just a bit of a tongue twister to say antepenultimate, especially if you read it in Sylvester the cat's voice like I tend to do.

Posted July 23, 2017, by Anonymous

Yes. It was common to publish contradictory info before the internet, but nobody ever read it anyway.

We also used to use "last two or three" instead of antepenultimate and penultimate, allegedly to save on syllables.

Posted July 22, 2017, by Anonymous

Cotton Belt was the nickname of the St. Louis Southwestern.

Posted July 22, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The alternate name of "Cotton Belt Flat Creek Bridge" mystifies me. Cotton Belt? Anyone?

Posted July 22, 2017, by John Akins (goatrancher567 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge has been replaced with a steel stringer concrete deck bridge

Posted July 22, 2017, by Luke

The claim that Tullock built everything from Belle to Versaille appears to stem from: https://books.google.com/books?id=5VBBAQAAMAAJ&q=gasconade+b... .

Posted July 14, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Army.mil story about the removal:

https://www.army.mil/article/164874

Posted July 14, 2017, by K. Allen Ballard (speedeeprint [at] gmail [dot] com)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=az9LtrORS8U

This is a video walkover from west to east by my son, Ken Ballard in 2015.

Posted July 12, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

After talking with a local and looking at maps I suspect the concrete here does not represent a lost bridge and should be considered for deletion. Any thoughts?

Posted July 12, 2017, by K. Allen Ballard (speedeeprint [at] gmail [dot] com)

Was just here, July 11th, 2017; old bridge removed, new one under construction, west end approach is being modified by dirt work on hillside.

Posted July 11, 2017, by K. Allen Ballard (speedeeprint [at] gmail [dot] com)

As a Ralls County resident I was not aware of bridge's removal. What a shame! This is a historic location and not just because of the the bridge. Nearby this bridge was the original location of Ralls' 1st mill built in 1820, St. Vrain's Mill. Historically, Ralls Commissioner's and legal counsel have the attitude that it's best to remove 'liabilities' than to preserve them. They are afraid someone will jump off of them! They really have no vision for historic preservation of any kind nor attracting industry.

The absurdness is they built an expensive UECB at another location at another county location. [It's called the million dollar bridge to nowhere] and has little traffic over it. So now, they simply remove this historic bridge, leaving only the low water crossing for the residents nearby.

The same fate befell the Historic rated Butler Ford bridge upstream in Madisonville. Fortunately the McDonald family have moved it to their property for preservation.

"You can lead a Horse to water, but, you can't make him think."

Posted July 10, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Katherine and Hubert S. were indeed his wife and son. Alonzo J. Tulloch died in 1904. I posted a link to his obituary on his category page. He worked with a lot of firms other than his own company.

Posted July 9, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I have noticed on several Missouri Valley B&I Works plaques after his 1888 buyout of the firm that also denote "A.J. Tullock & Co. Proprietors". I think he liked to maintain some Autonomy even before he started working in conjunction with other fabricators.

Here is some info I found on MVB&I Works and Tullock courtesy of Kansas Historical Society archives...

"The Missouri Valley Bridge Company was originally formed as a partnership between Edwin I. Farnsworth and D. W. Eaves in 1874. Edwin Farnsworth was one of the early settlers and city officials in Leavenworth, Kansas. In 1867 he was appointed City Engineer, a position he held until 1871, when he became an agent for the Wrought Iron Bridge Company. In 1872, he became Chief Engineer for the competing King Iron Bridge Company of Cleveland, Ohio, which had established a shop in Topeka. Although successful, Farnsworth came to realize that it would be easier to manufacture and sell bridges in Kansas than import them from eastern firms. Returning to Leavenworth, he organized the Missouri Valley Bridge and Iron Works [the initial name was actually the Missouri Valley Bridge Co.] In 1878, the business was taken over by the banking firm of Insley and Shire. A. J. Tullock, an engineer from Rockford, Illinois was named engineer and manager. Farnsworth moved on to found the Kansas City Bridge and Iron Company, the Chicago Bridge and Iron Company and the firm of Farnsworth and Blodgett."

"A. J. Tullock purchased interest in the company in 1880 and was listed as one of the proprietors. In 1888, he purchased the whole operation and operated it until his death in 1904. The company name was also changed in that year to Missouri Valley Bridge and Iron Company."

"In 1904 the company was incorporated and the active members were past employees with the exception of Amos E. Wilson, a local banker. Wilson acted as president until 1907, when Katherine S. Tullock, Vice President, assumed the presidency, holding this office until 1921, when H. S. Tullock became President."

I will assume that Katherine Tullock was likely the widow of A.J., and that H.S. Tullock was probably his son.

Posted July 9, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Thanks Luke, I was looking for this. I used this or a similar article as the source for adding ABC as the builder for the bridges on this line.

The exact reference is found on page 465, middle column, third paragraph, "Contractors".

Posted July 9, 2017, by Luke

According to this, AmBridge built the bridges in association with Tullock: https://books.google.com/books?id=8qIxAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA460&dq=R...

Posted July 9, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This shows just how incredibly Moronic MoDOT is! Why not just close it off and install a low water crossing NEXT to it! I'm not sure if this was an attempt to remove the bridge intact and the contractor bungled it or what! Rediculous!!!

Todd Baslee Photo

Posted July 9, 2017, by Elliott Johnson (elliottsgon15 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This bridge is being replaced. The road is closed with no defined detour in place.

Posted July 8, 2017, by Elliott Johnson (elliottsgon15 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

But not very much time. I spoke with a nearby landowner and MoDot removed it because it was "unsafe". Now it is a horrible low water crossing.

Posted July 7, 2017, by Anonymous

The American Bridge Company did not build this bridge. It was the Midwest Valley Bridge and Iron Works Co. of Leavenworth, KS, which was owned by A. J. Tullock. Every bridge on the Rock Island, St. Louis to Kansas City line, from the Gasconade River to the town of Versailles, Mo was designed and built by this company.

Posted July 7, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)
Posted July 4, 2017, by Luke

Historicaerials shows a farm here in 1969.

Posted July 1, 2017, by David Huffman (davhuffm [at] mindspring [dot] com)

Scheduled to be replaced by 2019 at a cost of $68.2 million.

Posted June 30, 2017, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

To me, it looks like the superstructure was replaced between 1871 and the 1936 replacement. The late images do not seem to have the same type of compression members as the early images and a lot of other details are different.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted June 30, 2017, by Fmiser (fmiser [at] gmail [dot] com)

I think this is the same bridge as

https://bridgehunter.com/mo/st-charles/first-wabash-rr/

Both are in about the same location. Both were built in 1868. Both suffered a collapsed span causing a train to end up in the river in 1879. North Missouri Railroad was absorbed by the Wabash Railroad. And the image on this page sure looks like the same bridge with regard to span size, style, height, etc.

I was going to comment on the "fink" category - but since I think this is a duplicate entry - with less information, it should be deleted and any pertinent information shifted over to the First Wabash page.

Then, regarding the railroad. Should each of the owners be listed? St. Louis, Kansas City and Northern Railway was the successor to North Missouri Railroad - but only lasted from 1872 to 1879 before becoming part of Wabash. For now I'm NOT listing St. Louis, Kansas City and Northern Railway.

And then there is the "Trellis" through trusses. Looks kinda like a double intersecting Warren with half struts/half tension rods.

Posted June 29, 2017, by K. Allen Ballard (speedeeprint [at] gmail [dot] com)

Visited here late afternoon, June 27th, 2017; trying to fill in the 'blanks' where no pictures existed near me in NE Missouri. Solid bridge, very serviceable, has some of the usual bent railings and beams. More pics to follow as soon as I process them.

Posted June 29, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The ashlar piers suggest this bridge has been here over a century. The 1950 date may be when they added the concrete caps and raised the approaches.

Posted June 29, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I would agree. I would guess 1910 at the latest.

Posted June 29, 2017, by John Marvig

This certainly doesn't look like a 1950s railroad bridge to me. Looks more like a ca. 1910 bridge.

Posted June 28, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Okay, I know that all of you are probably staring at the incredible Whipple truss...

But, I was looking at the pony span, and I was paying special attention to the outriggers. I cannot tell for sure if they are cruciform or not. If, and this is a big if, but if they are cruciform, then perhaps the Kansas City Bridge & Iron Co. might be another company that used cruciform outriggers. This would not be too much of a surprise given that cruciform iron was readily available at one time and the related Missouri Valley Bridge & Iron Works used it.

This is a highly significant bridge on many levels.

Posted June 28, 2017, by K. Allen Ballard (speedeeprint [at] gmail [dot] com)

Visited here June 27, 2017; bridge is intact but closed by concrete barrier. This was one road / part of access to state bottoms.

Posted June 28, 2017, by K. Allen Ballard (speedeeprint [at] gmail [dot] com)

Visited here, June 27, 2017. This is one of those must see bridges, especially as a great 'photog' subject. The light was amazing at 8am with a light fog.

Bridge is 'closed' but no barricades are present; deck has been removed in about 4 places to hinder vehicles. Given it's present condition I would agree it likely WAS pretty exciting to cross in a car or truck when it was last open.

I did not venture across it on foot today, because I was alone. No sense in risking anything just for a few more pictures from the other side on this trip.

Posted June 28, 2017, by K. Allen Ballard (speedeeprint [at] gmail [dot] com)

Visited here late afternoon, June 27, 2017. Bridge is closed by large piles of gravel @ either end. Recent pictures to follow later this week.

Posted June 26, 2017, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Awesome find Clark!!!

Posted June 24, 2017, by Brian (ironbrigadeb1863 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The bridge was part of a major road at the time connecting Grandview Missouri with the county seat in Independence. It cut the travel time between the two by several hours. Important for a young man from Grandview who had just purchased his first car so that he could drive to Independence to visit his girlfriend. The young man was Harry Truman and his girlfriend was Bess.

Green Bridge (Missouri)
Posted June 21, 2017, by Anonymous
Green Bridge (Missouri)
Posted June 20, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)
Posted June 20, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Yet another bridge that Missouri (wrongly) thinks is at the end of its life. http://ccheadliner.com/news/modot-closes-green-bridge/articl...

Posted June 16, 2017, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

Formerly Frisco, now BNSF

Posted June 16, 2017, by Jason Smith (flensburg [dot] bridgehunter [dot] av [at] googlemail [dot] com)

To the bridge lovers and historians out there: I'm looking for some help. I'm looking for some information on bridges built by the company Raymond and Campbell, as well as additional information on the history of the firm itself. An article has been compiled about the bridge building firm for you to read and contribute. If you have any information on both, plus photos of the bridges built by Raymond and Campbell as well as their agent George C. Wise, please send me a PM or e-mail and I'll be happy to add whatever you have to what I have compiled so far. Thanks for your help. :-) https://bridgehunterschronicles.wordpress.com/2017/06/16/ray...

Posted June 13, 2017, by K. Allen Ballard (speedeeprint [at] gmail [dot] com)

These 4 Lost Creek Bridges are very similar to the Canal Bridges north of Quincy, IL in Adams & Hancock Counties. I have friends in Elsberry and I'm not sure how I missed them before? Have driven by them a bunch but never caught sight of them! Sounds like a road trip is in order.....

Posted June 9, 2017, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

Per MODOT, the bridge is scheduled to close June 12, 2017 for replacement

Posted June 8, 2017, by K. Allen Ballard (speedeeprint [at] gmail [dot] com)

Visited here June 7, 2017 about 2:30pm. Railings bent up but bridge is still very serviceable.

PIKE CR 9111 (Missouri)
Posted June 6, 2017, by Terry (terrytompkins978 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

The concrete abutments for the bridge were heavily damaged by flooding in May 2017. The bridge is currently impassable, leaving families stranded unless they have access to a 4-wheel drive vehicle capable of fording the creek.

Unfortunately, road 9111 is private and has never been owned by the county. The same is true of the bridge, so the county government says they can not repair it. This leaves the families stuck trying to raise $10,000 for new abutments and they are having trouble finding it.

http://khqa.com/news/local/damaged-bridge-leaves-pike-county...

Posted June 6, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

I have no idea whether the QO&KC was double track but it seems unlikely except at sidings. Some pics underneath would give an idea of whether the floor beams are original or not.

Posted June 5, 2017, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Clark,

This almost reminds me of a Santa Fe bridge that would have been on the double tracked mainline nearby. As some of the midwestern bridgehunters know, the Santa Fe was notorious for selling and reusing spans wherever they could; creating some unique bridges.

Posted June 5, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

FWIW, the Quincy, Omaha and Kansas City Railroad ran north of here between Edina and Know. It was closed in the '30s. Railfans...?

Posted June 5, 2017, by K. Allen Ballard (speedeeprint [at] gmail [dot] com)

Visited here late afternoon, June 3rd, 2017. Heavy duty girder plate, very wide, could easily accommodate modern farm equipment; possible former RR span moved from elsewhere.

Posted May 28, 2017, by august vargas (gutoi [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Yes, a very great bridge. Had the pleasure to cross it 4 times in two days with my 2007 Triumph motorcycle w/ my friend Richard, on the way to Chain of Rocks Bridge then to Luna Cafe, (aka Al Capone's bar) for a beer or two, before heading back to the McKinley bridge to joint Pasadena English motorcycles of old ages, club heading to California on Route 66. That was a very wow unique moment for me to be on those two bridges over Mississippi river.

Posted May 25, 2017, by K. Allen Ballard (speedeeprint [at] gmail [dot] com)

Visited here May 9th, 2017; didn't have a lot of time to spend and left my boots at home so I couldn't go 'feet wet' to center up on the bridge and get the upstream side. Another time.....I'm only 40 minutes away.

Posted May 24, 2017, by Sharon Spear (sweetsexysharon [at] gmail [dot] com)

On April 16th we were out taking photos and we stopped so I could get photos of the old bridge. Little did I know what would happen to the bridge on May 1st! We returned on May 19th and I took photos of the wreckage. I didn't want to post them on this page so as not to spoil the beauty of the old bridge. I have posted both the "beauty shots" and the "wreckage shots" to my PBase page at this link:

http://www.pbase.com/sharonmsphotos/bruns_bridge

Avert Bridge (Missouri)
Posted May 21, 2017, by Zach Smith (zsmith [at] roaddogind [dot] com)

is this bridge still for sale or bid???

Posted May 20, 2017, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

This was a wild goose chase. Information and photos at this link suggested this was a functioning replica Holland-style drawbridge:

http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WMFG03_Story_Woods_Draw_B...

It, however, has been replaced by a boring non-artistic footbridge.

Posted May 19, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Just be glad that this bridge has such a beam. Not all bridges have them.

Posted May 19, 2017, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

Yes, that floor beam is the only thing keeping this bridge upright. But it could easily fail at any time.

Posted May 19, 2017, by Eric Kinkhorst (erick [dot] bud [at] gmail [dot] com)

Not even a bridge.

Posted May 18, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

It appears to me that the floor beam underneath the end posts is the only thing that is keeping this bridge from collapsing. That floor beam is allowing this Pratt truss to remain standing as a three-legged bridge for now.

Posted May 18, 2017, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

Field visit today: I'm not sure how this bridge is still standing. There's almost nothing supporting the southwest endpost.

Posted May 18, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nick:

That sounds like a reasonable estimation. This bridge appears to be constructed with riveted connections. Rivets began to fall out of favor in the years after WWII as bolted and welded connections became popular.

Posted May 18, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

20's to early 40's it's looking like?