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Posted November 11, 2018, by Neil Krout (kickinpony [dot] 66 [at] gmail [dot] com)

As of 11/11/2018 bridge is closed. There is a large snag of logs on the West side of the bridge. I didn't venture out onto the bridge to see if it was damaged or not.

Posted November 9, 2018, by Greg Albers (gjalbers777 [at] gmail [dot] com)

If this is the same bridge referred to in this article, both drivers did not survive as Scott remembers.

http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2015/jun/10/40-years-ago-lawren...

Posted November 6, 2018, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Tony, what are your feeling on Luke's suggestion that all examples of this truss style were products of one of the two Pan American Bridge Companies? I've never associated a builder with the Powers Highway Bridge in Michigan. Exact details vary, specifically, some bridges of this style include built-up lifting holes for installation equipment/cranes.

Posted November 5, 2018, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Likely from the lesser known Pan American Bridge Company of Moberly, Missouri and not my hometown Pan American Bridge Company of New Castle, Indiana. The Missouri firm actually took it's name from the older Indiana firm, who also supplied some of the trusses for the fledgling company.

Posted November 5, 2018, by Luke

I'm glad I found a rarity, and I can only hope the towing/wrecking company that seems to own it now leaves it be.

Posted November 5, 2018, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Simple Lattice pony I would say. I have heard the more unique Canton ones referred to as a "Lattice Girder".

Posted November 5, 2018, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

These were very common in Missouri. There were 33 of them at the time of Fraser's historic bridge inventory in the early 1990s (see attached).

The inventory called them "lattice bedsteads", which as Nathan points out on his website, is not really accurate. They were lumped together with other true bedstead truss types, which were so common at the time in Missouri that very few were considered National Register eligible.

I don't know offhand how many of these "lattice" bridges are left, but it can't be very many. True bedsteads have also dwindled: what was once the most common truss type in Missouri is now one of the rarest.

Posted November 4, 2018, by Luke

This bridge bears an eerie resemblance to a relocated one I discovered in Iowa: https://bridgehunter.com/ia/muscatine/bh79331/

And while seeing if other examples existed in Missouri, I came across an entry that led me to this page on Nathan's site: https://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=m...

I have a feeling that spans of this specific style were primarily a Pan American Bridge Co. product.

I've emailed Nathan about it and hope he reaffirms my suspicions.

Posted November 1, 2018, by Trista Roberts (robertstrista [at] yahoo [dot] com)

We called this the Z bridge because of the way the road went on either side of it and the side rails started with the roads. In the 90's my church (Six Mile Baptist) always had hay rides in the fall and we went over it. We always stopped and anyone who didn't want to ride on the trailer could get off and walk across. When I was learning to drive in 95', I missed my turn taking the back way to church. My dad said, "Don't worry, there is another way to go." I kept driving and we came up on the Z bridge. I had an 88' AMC Eagle station wagon. My dad would not let me get out of driving over it since I missed my turn. I will never forget that.

Posted October 31, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Once again, well done Luke.

Posted October 31, 2018, by Luke
Posted October 31, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Topo maps show the road going beneath the RR so I imagine this is a "tunnel" or culvert.

The 1943 Berryman 15' map does not show this rail. Looking at the bridge to the west it seems likely that this crossing was built in the last 75 years. Did the railroad not come to Steelville until that late?

Posted October 22, 2018, by Pam Wilson Martin (Pammartin68 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I remember with fondness the many summers spent at Camp Pin Oak as a Girl Scout. In the summer of 1965 our senior scout Unit 5 took a 60 mile canoe trip. The highlight of our trip was all 18 of us beaching our canoes and walking across the bridge via the catwalk which was suspended from beneath the bridge. Not sure this was allowed, but oh what fun that special summer!

Posted October 20, 2018, by Jeremy Ruble (saukee0 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

A lot of local folks are taking interest in this bridge since I started this project. When the road commissioner calls me back with the verification I will talk more with him on the structural intergity of the bridge and if there are any hopes in saving it.

Posted October 20, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Jeremy may have reopened hope for this one. It looks too big for an easy (relatively) relocation. Anyone imagine a scenario where this bridge is savable in situ? NRHP seems like a place to start.

Posted October 19, 2018, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

I went back through my archives and found an email I received in 2005 from a worker at the Pike County road & bridge department. He asked me if there was anything that could be done about saving this bridge. At that time, he expected that the county would leave the bridge as-is until it eventually collapsed and had to be fished out of the river.

Fortunately we haven't reached that last stage yet.

Posted October 19, 2018, by Jeremy Ruble (saukee0 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Iím not really sure. When the road commissioner verifys with the county clerk and call me back I will ask him about this.

Posted October 19, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

If the county owns it, what does that mean for the chance of recognition and preservation?

Posted October 14, 2018, by Gary Dyhouse (friscogary [at] yahoo [dot] com)

You can photograph this bridge as it is not in Fort Leonard Wood itself

Posted October 13, 2018, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Jeremy, your photo of the bridge through the weeds is Beautiful !

Posted October 12, 2018, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Looks like a pony truss

Posted October 12, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I've found the best strategy is to ask. I can't honestly recall ever being turned down, and more often than not the people are more than happy to talk about "their" bridge. There's a number of bridges where I've withheld pictures for a period of time, particularly to avoid ruffling the feathers of anyone who may object.

Posted October 12, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

It's pretty common for plowing to encroach on public rights of way. Rural folks (I was once among them) actively discourage people from coming around their property due to the ease with which thefts can occur in isolated areas. The county highway department has the legally correct information on where the public can freely travel.

You don't need a plat book. The online GIS and a verification call to the county should get accurate information.

Posted October 12, 2018, by Jeremy Ruble (saukee0 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

The road to this bridge on the west side has been completely removed and is now a corn field. You have to walk up the hill to get to it. The woman chewed me out on Facebook and said she is reporting it to the owner. I will be obtaining a plat book to do more research. For now I would just stay away. Also the road is currently under weather to it.

Posted October 12, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

I've seen occasional mistakes due to slow updates, but it might be worth a call to the county to verify ownership. Their GIS shows this bridge and roadway as county property.

https://maps.camavision.com/pikemo?pin=010930000000005000

Posted October 11, 2018, by Zeke Clawson (Rclawson [at] sbuniv [dot] edu)

Bridge is now only accessible from the west. The road on the east is closed and returned to nature.

Posted October 6, 2018, by C. Siman (absaroka6 [at] att [dot] net)

The wooden span is being replaced with a steel span of the same design. 5 Oct 2018.

Posted September 26, 2018, by Sharon Spear (sweetsexysharon [at] gmail [dot] com)

On 9-29-17, we stopped to take pictures before the worked continued to pull the bridge out of the river. On 9-22-18, we stopped to take pictures and were surprised. Someone, I don't know who, built a tribute to the old bridge.

http://www.pbase.com/sharonmsphotos/bruns_bridge

Posted September 25, 2018, by Don Baker (thefiddlepicker [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I grew up in F - Town, When I was a kid we used to walk from Fredericktown to the city lake on the RR Tracks, Their was another small RR trussel between the lake & town, On one side under the tracks was a big opening on the town side It was made by the RR, We had to climb a rope to get into it, I never knew what it was for, But it was about 8 feet wide 20 feet long & 20 feet high,,??? Do you know what this was for?

Posted September 14, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Different RR shown in the same book. The 1887 Independence topo shows C&A so I'm going to have to write it off as an error in the index map.

Posted September 14, 2018, by Don Morrison

If you go to the township 49, range 31 map of the same North West Publishing Company Atlas of Jackson County 1904, it does say Chicago and Alton crossing the Little Blue at Selsa Station.

http://www.historicmapworks.com/Map/US/61179/Township+49+N++...

Missouri pacific is farther north.

An error on the mapmaker's part?

Posted September 12, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

A puzzle for the rail fans: The North West Publishing Company Atlas of Jackson County 1904 shows this as the Missouri Pacific.

http://www.historicmapworks.com/Map/US/61154/Jackson+County+...

Posted September 11, 2018, by Laci Baker (lacibwiggins [at] gmail [dot] com)

Bridge at Camp

Posted September 11, 2018, by Laci Baker (lacibwiggins [at] gmail [dot] com)

Found this photo dated August 1925

Posted September 7, 2018, by Fmiser (fmiser [at] gmail [dot] com)

I drove past today... and the new bridge is open and the old one is - gone.

This is a location that really did need a wider bridge suitable for heavier loads - but it is so sad to see the old one just destroyed. Missouri sure seems to be intent on eliminating all historic bridges.

Posted September 6, 2018, by Fmiser (fmiser [at] gmail [dot] com)

A friend tipped me off to an article about this bridge in a magazine called "Rural Missouri"

http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/ruralmissouri/201807/index.p...

It's a fair article. Not much technical data, but what's there seems to be accurate. Mostly it focuses on a local resident who is intent on saving the bridge from demolition when the new bridge is done.

Posted September 2, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

I'm told it was taken back to have the parts rebuilt and reused. I'm not sure who will own them.

Posted September 1, 2018, by Gerald Hart

Visited this bridge today and it was gone.

Posted September 1, 2018, by Luke

The style of postcard is mid 1900s, and already shows riveted connections vs the pinned connections prominent in 1890s bridge construction.

So this isn't an 1891 bridge, but it likely replaced one, so I'll make up an entry for it.

Posted September 1, 2018, by Rich Kaduce (rkaduce [at] outlook [dot] com)

I think there is picture of the bridge (circa 1900) on the Mississippi River and Bonnterre Railroad wiki website. As for the riveted connections I'm sure the bridge has been upgraded to handle modern traffic.

Posted August 31, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I would estimate this to be an early 1900s bridge. It is a lighter structure than later riveted trusses, but it still shows features of the 20th century. It is possible it was set onto older stone substructures, which could have been built in 1891.

Posted August 31, 2018, by Anonymous

I see riveted connections, which means it's probably later than 1891.

Posted August 31, 2018, by Rich Kaduce (rkaduce [at] outlook [dot] com)

A 1904 USGS map shows this bridge was on the Mississippi River and Bonnterre Railroad line. The bridge was built in 1891.

Cherry Dip (Missouri)
Posted August 29, 2018, by Leslie Davis (ausrakay [at] hotmail [dot] com)

After checking the map you provided, the location you have is not of the bridge the locals called Cherry Dip. You have located the "low water" crossing that used to be on Byars road. That location was South of High Grove. Cherry Dip was a few miles North. Cherry Dip was maybe closer to Ruskin. The bridge was also on Food Lane. The road changes from Byars Road to Food Lane at Harry S. Truman Drive. Cherry Dip was north of that location. The creek it crossed doesn't have a name that I am aware of.

The link provided shows the original location of Cherry Dip. Part of the reason it got that name was because of the road name "Food Lane". It was "Cherry Dip on Food Lane". Classic!

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Byars+Rd,+Grandview,+MO+64...

Posted August 29, 2018, by Leslie Davis (ausrakay [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The pictures on this page are not of Cherry Dip on Byars road. The road is still in use and the original "cherry dip" was removed. The photos show a road barrier and a creek bed. Not part of Cherry Dip.

I grew up in that area and crossed that bridge MANY times. It was a local icon that was involved in many accidents.

Posted August 29, 2018, by Leslie Davis (ausrakay [at] hotmail [dot] com)

After more checking the map provided the location you have it not of the bridge the locals called Cherry Dip. You have located the "low water" crossing that used to be on Byars road and that location was South of High Grove. Cherry Dip was a few miles North. Cherry Dip was maybe closer to Ruskin. The bridge was also on Food Lane. The road changes from Byars Road to Food Lane at Harry S. Truman Drive. Cherry Dip was north of that location. The creek it crossed doesn't have a name that I am aware of.

The link provided shows the original location of Cherry Dip. Part of the reason it got that name was because of the road name "Food Lane". It was "Cherry Dip on Food Lane". Classic!

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Byars+Rd,+Grandview,+MO+64...

Posted August 29, 2018, by Leslie Davis (ausrakay [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The pictures on this page are not of Cherry Dip on Byars road. The road is still in use and the original "cherry dip" was removed. The photos show a road barrier and a creek bed. Not part of Cherry Dip.

I grew up in that area and crossed that bridge MANY times. It was a local icon that was involved in many accidents.

Posted August 26, 2018, by Anonymous (tillerman61 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Bridge to be replaced in 2019.

Posted August 26, 2018, by David Huffman (davhuffm [at] mndsprng [dot] com)

Bridge will be closed for one year for repairs.

https://fox2now.com/2018/08/26/martin-luther-king-bridge-clo...

Posted August 19, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The 1903/13 15' quad shows a single track. In 1945 there is a double track. Probably the original single track used the stone piers, the second track went on the concrete extensions, then the original track was scrapped at some time later than 1945. The 1954 7.5' shows the double track ending at Times Beach just before the bridge and a single track continuing toward St. Louis.

Posted August 19, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

To me, it appears that the existing bridge was added onto an older deck truss that used the double track piers. The old deck truss probably was 30 years or so older than the current truss, and was probably removed when the double track was no longer necessary.

Posted August 19, 2018, by Remick Bloss (remickbl [at] gmail [dot] com)

I was just getting ready to ask why this bridge was not double-tracked at the outset. I mean, the builders built the piers for a double-track bridge.

Posted August 19, 2018, by owen mcnamee (soapmanii [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Drove down the Backbone sometime in the early 60s when i was in my 20s going from rock to rock and through gullys in the gravel. Scary then and I sure would not want to do it at 80 As I recall there were still some boards in place then.

Posted August 18, 2018, by David Sears (searsd [at] merrimack [dot] edu)

I visited this bridge in the spring of 1973 when it was on dry land. I have two black and white photographs taken at that time.

Posted August 14, 2018, by Luke

There's a small, unnamed ditch on the west end of town that empties into Hickory near the RV park.

Stream width based on streetview seems to fit the bill, although the house in the background no longer seems to exist.

Posted August 14, 2018, by Carl Stclair (stclaircarl [at] gmail [dot] com)

my dad built a copy of this bridge for his model railroad layout in HO scale.

Posted August 13, 2018, by Eric Kinkhorst (erick [dot] bud [at] gmail [dot] com)

I ride on this bridge all the time. It's neat old stretch of 65.

Posted August 13, 2018, by Curtis Hudson

It's a shame beautiful pieces of history such as this one are removed, although it's nice the approach was saved to be used as a memorial.

Posted August 12, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Drove over this beauty today. Small holes rotting all the way through on about 5 planks, but nothing dangerous. Cool spot, totally creeps up on you.

Posted August 4, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

I don't have exact information, only my memory from living in this area on and off. The 1935 USGS topo gives a good picture of the area as I first remember it 20 years later.

Between Grandview and the yard east of Dodson where it intersected the MoPac there were two stations, Jeffreys (west of Hickman Mills) then Holmes Park. The valley leading from Grandview (1070') down to the Blue River (750') carried this rail and US 71. US 71 crossed under the rail just north of 103rd Street.

In the '60s US 71 was made limited access from 95th Street south past Grandview. I-435 crossed 95th about a mile east of 71 and curved west toward Kansas, crossing 71 between Holmes Park and Jefferys where 435 and a realigned 71 both crossed the Frisco on bridges. Old 71 from 95th to Blue Ridge became known as Hickman Mills Drive.

So, the rail was open circa 1970 with occasional short trains seen parallel to 71 between 95th and 87th. The north side of Grandview had a couple of light industries along the rail and it's possible the quarry along the track north of 95th used it.

Starting in the early '80s I-470 was built east from the 435/71 junction. The junction, which had been congested before, became a true mess. In the early '90s a series of changes and additions were made to the main roads and some of the lesser roads were significantly realigned and portions eliminated. It was around this time that they no longer bridged over the rail. Holmes Park was completely erased. In 1992 the Blue River bridges were replaced and the rail bridge was probably removed at that time. The latest round of construction improved the geometry of the Interstate junction and wiped out the remaining evidence of Jefferys.

TMI I suppose, but lacking official records (which certainly exist in the form of the county highway maps) you'll have to figure the rail was in limited use from Grandview to Melville in 1970 and abandoned by 1985. I hope this helps answer your question.

I'll probably condense, delete, or move this at some future time since it doesn't have much to do with this particular bridge page.

Posted August 4, 2018, by Aaron DeShazo (deshazo317 [at] gmail [dot] com)

So, do we know when exactly the Frisco track north from Grandview to Leeds was abandoned?

Posted August 1, 2018, by Anonymous (tillerman61 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Bridge and the overflow bridge to be replaced in 2019.

Posted August 1, 2018, by Anonymous (tillerman61 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Bridge to be replaced in 2019

Posted July 29, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Nice!!

Posted July 29, 2018, by Neil Krout (kickinpony [dot] 66 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I ventured out to this bridge today. It's in pretty decent condition. I want to return in the Fall, so I can get some Wide Shots and not have to worry about snakes.

ASB Bridge (Missouri)
Posted July 28, 2018, by SteveCarras (gcarras [at] aol [dot] com)

Nathan Holt, I always noticed that multiple cable/counterweight on either side factor!

and the "fixed upper deck/movable lower deck" feature,too!

And then there was that southern side splitting the upper roadway deck (as it turned out to be) in two, inside going east toward Kansas City, between the northern and southern side, and outside right outside the truss itself going westbound toward the farms! (my famly sued to come from there..)

Posted July 27, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

If you can get to it without entering posted or restricted property. Please post your images here if you take some.

Posted July 27, 2018, by Mary E Flaugher (mary [dot] flaugher1919 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Am I allowed to photograph this bridge myself?

Posted July 19, 2018, by David Eike (eikes [at] sbcglobal [dot] net)

Looks like Bass Pro is stepping up to restore - and move - this bridge:

https://www.news-leader.com/story/news/local/ozarks/now/2018...

Posted July 18, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

It appears that this bridge was originally five separate spans. The bridges were slowly removed between 2005 and 2012. I wonder what would have caused them to be removed after so many years abandoned..shame I can't find any pictures of the structures.

Avert Bridge (Missouri)
Posted July 14, 2018, by Mike (Mikewineryassociates [at] gmail [dot] com)

Is this bridge still available? I'm in the process of placing a bridge on the north toe river, need around 100 ft span. Are there companies that assess cost of rehabbing and moving these bridges? My budget is $75,000 max.

Thanks,

Mike

Posted July 13, 2018, by George oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I agree with you 100% Nathan that private funds should be used instead of federal monies.The railroads built these bridges with their own money,not government money and should bear total financial cost for any rehabilitation or removal work.If anybody can prove me wrong on this,I welcome your arguments against what I posted.

Posted July 12, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Correct, this is a demolition of a bridge built by one of the most important engineers in American history, and one of the longest simple-span bridges of the 19th Century. The loss of this bridge is an atrocity. I am just glad the federal funding got canceled. Public tax dollars should not be given to private big corporations, especially to demolish rare historic bridges. If they want to destroy priceless treasures they deserve to do it on their own dime.

Posted July 12, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I believe this is a total replacement of the remaining historic portions of the structure. Darn shame.

Posted July 12, 2018, by Shaun Speers (speersfms [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Excerpt of article from KMOV in St. Louis:

http://www.kmov.com/story/38613955/oldest-mississippi-river-...

The Terminal Railroad Association of St. Louis announced Tuesday that it's moving forward with a $172 million contract with Walsh Construction Co. to rebuild the Merchants Bridge, which opened in 1890.

The bridge faced the potential of being shut down if not rebuilt in the near future. The project was put in doubt last month when the federal government denied a grant covering one-third of the costs. But further delays could have resulted in higher steel prices.

Posted July 11, 2018, by Luke
Posted July 11, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Is 1876 too early for a build date for the bridge shown?

Posted July 9, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I took the attached photos in 2016, and as you can see the approach span piers have seen better days. Enormous cracks directly under the stringer bearings. This is almost certainly why the bridge was closed.

Posted July 9, 2018, by James Wireman (jameslovesbridges_86 [at] ymail [dot] com)

Why Is Did This Bridge Shut Down in 2016? What is The Matter With It?

Posted July 8, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

On the 1910 topo Main Street continues west across this bridge. By the 1948 map it was gone.

Posted July 7, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

There are plans to replace it on a new alignment. Rehabbing the existing bridge as a pedestrian crossing is cheaper than adding a sidewalk to the new construction. See page 11:

http://www.smithvillemo.org/files/documents/BoardofAldermenP...

Posted July 7, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

According to a 1920s topo map this road predates US 36 and probably never was paved.

Posted July 1, 2018, by Aaron DeShazo (deshazo317 [at] gmail [dot] com)

So, do we know when exactly the Frisco track north from Grandview to Leeds was abandoned?

Posted July 1, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This certainly would be a lightweight bridge. Iíve found that thereís really no rhyme or reason to where bridges were relocated to, mostly just based on what was available at that time. If this route was originally constructed in 1888, it would seem to be a fairly light truss for that time period, especially compared to similar structures.

Posted July 1, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

There may be a nearby river crossing that got a wider bridge when the line was double-tracked, similar to what seems to have happened at Sibley on the same line.

Posted June 30, 2018, by Linda Boyd

We went to see this bridge today and found out it's been replaced.

Posted June 30, 2018, by Linda Boyd

We went to see this bridge today and found out it's been replaced.

Posted June 27, 2018, by Mr Kelly McClanahan

Work has progressed. Old line is being converted into a rail trail. For the first time in years it can be seen from 98th Street. Reports have the tunnel still in fairly good condition. First section of trail is supposed to be open by fall of 2018.

Posted June 26, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

ATSF Bridge Records from 1937 give a build date of 1910 and a strengthening date of the floor of 1927. Given other ATSF overpasses, I wouldn't be surprised if this one was also a reused railroad span.

Posted June 21, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The current bridge replaced the low water crossing that replaced this bridge.

Posted June 20, 2018, by darren Smith (rayelmdar [at] gmail [dot] com)

this bridge has been replaced by MO DOT with a 2 lane bridge several years ago

Posted June 19, 2018, by Joseph Weisbrod (Weisbrodjoseph [at] gmail [dot] com)

Pushed my way through a bunch of brush and finally found this bridge after seeing it on an historic map. Connected the Frisco to Scullin Steel.

Posted June 12, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

interesting curved end railings on this TBEEM. Nice find James.

Posted June 6, 2018, by Rusty Weisman (Russell [dot] Weisman [at] Modot [dot] Mo [dot] Gov)

The 1996 FraserDesign Missouri Historic Bridge Inventory appears to be in error with respect to this bridge. The Gillis bridge built in 1908 was at Gillis Ford. That bridge replaced an earlier bridge at that location, built J. B. Clayville for $215 in 1896. Gillis ford is in the SW 1/4 Section 27, about 2.5 road miles SE of Shelbyville. The SW 1/4 of Sec 27 T58N R10W was owned by Mrs. W. D. Gillis in 1878 (Edwards Brothers 1878 Illustrated Atlas of Shelby County). This bridge is located closer to 5 road miles from Shelbyville in T57N R10W Sec 1-2. Newspaper accounts suggest that this bridge was built c. 1911-1912 following a petition to the county court in 1909 by the neighbors lead by neighboring landowner Charles F. Perrigo/Parigo (Hunnewell Graphic 12 Feb. 1909). January 1911 newspaper notices indicate that the county was willing to build a bridge at 'Graveyard ford' if the neighboring landowners would provide fill and haul it for free.

This location appears to have been known as both 'Baker ford' and 'Graveyard ford.' The land southeast of the ford was owned by J. R. Baker in 1878 and George E. Baker Jr. in 1902, thus accounting for the ĎBaker fordí designation.

There is a small cemetery just south of the bridge on the east side of Black Creek that accounts for the references to this location as 'Graveyard ford'. That cemetery includes the marked grave of Thomas Jefferson Davis (d.1849) who was original owner of the 80 acres just north of the Bridge. The unmarked 1833 grave of Angus McDonald Holliday, the original owner of the land east of the bridge (SW 1/4 Sec 1) is also likely there, along with the grave of William T. Matson. Angus M. Holliday died in early June 1833 from cholera - contracted from his neighbor William T. Matson who had been in Palmyra when the 1833 epidemic broke out. Matson was returning to his nearby home on the west side of Black Creek from Palmyra but was unable to cross Black Creek at the ford due to high water. Matson stayed overnight with Holliday and died there the next morning. At Matson's burial, Angus Holliday fell ill with cholera and then he died the next day (History of Monroe and Shelby Counties, Missouri, 1884).

Posted May 22, 2018, by Steve Ellison (c10burb [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge is no longer open to traffic making County Road 323 a dead end road from either end.

Posted May 22, 2018, by Rusty Weisman

On Sept 4, 1966, one of the four spans was demolished by a tractor trailer truck loaded with potatoes driven by Judson O. Bullis of Iowa Falls Ia. Bullis was killed in the crash.

The bridge reopened on Sept. 23 1966 following repairs by State Highway Dept. crews working in conjunction with Parson's Construction Co. of New London MO.

Posted May 21, 2018, by Remick Bloss (remickbl [at] gmail [dot] com)

I am glad to finally see more photos of this bridge. Traveled down this road several years back, but were unable to see the portion hidden by the trees or the black girder bridge that was behind that building.

Posted May 19, 2018, by Curtis Hudson

The bridge is sadly still closed, but it appears to be moving closer to its rehabilitation! Hope to see it open in the not so distant future!

Posted May 18, 2018, by Francis (francisbittner77 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Does this bridge have a factory near it or did it have a factory near it??

Posted May 12, 2018, by Jim Kuntz (jimkyos [at] charter [dot] net)

County of bridge: Franklin County

Location of bridge: Labadie Bottom Rd. & Fiddle Creek, Labadie

Bridge built: 1920

Abandoned after 1993

The 1993 flood, one of the worst in all of history on either the Missouri River or the Mississippi River, caused this creek to flood and as result flooded the entire bottom land, and even the nearby power plant.

Because of this flood, a levees were repaired along the Missouri River, and new levees were built along Fiddle Creek and Tavern Creek.

The levee along Fiddle Creek caused the Labadie Bottom Road to be re-routed, and thus causing the abandonment of this bridge.

The floods of 2012 and 2015 caused the bridge to be, first severely damaged, than collapsing.