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Posted December 14, 2017, by Barry (bllauver [at] toad [dot] net)

There might be an interesting story behind this bridge. It appears to have been intentionally half-buried.

Posted December 12, 2017, by Jeremy (jeremyjhill [at] gmail [dot] com)

Ok, here are a bunch of pictures of both the bridge (from different angles) and the pile of "stuff" that is nearby, being overtaken by vines, rose bushes, and trees. I hope you all find this interesting. Thanks!

Posted December 11, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The AHR-KC report in sources refers to a court record giving ca.1870 for the build date. We have another nearby: http://bridgehunter.com/mo/cass/camp-branch/

Posted December 11, 2017, by K. Allen Ballard (speedeeprint [at] gmail [dot] com)

Finally visited here, 12-08-17; very well maintained, two track gravel road from MO Rt M south to it. Bridge has new bolts installed. Wing walls & deck are in decent shape.

Posted December 11, 2017, by K. Allen Ballard (speedeeprint [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is not far from my dentist in Shelbina, so I visit here somewhat frequently. Shot some video here this visit, bridge is very unique with its' tall sides and picturesque setting.

Posted December 10, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

They look like cruciform outriggers to me. I am curious as to whether the date of Circa 1870 has been confirmed or not. I would expect a Circa 1870 iron bridge in this area to have been a Bowstring. I am not saying that a Pratt truss would not have been built in 1870, but the Bowstring was still the bridge of choice at that time.

In addition, I am not seeing any cast-iron members or cast-iron assemblies that would suggest a Circa 1870 construction date. Overall, this bridge looks more like an 1880s or 1890s bridge to me. It just happens to have some cruciform members which were popular in the 1870s.

If this bridge was in fact built in the 1870s then it would have been extremely significant, but even in 1890s bridge with cruciform outriggers is highly significant and worthy of preservation. Either way, it is too bad that this bridge was demolished.

Posted December 10, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Does photo six show a cruciform outrigger?

Posted December 9, 2017, by Mike Lasater (mtlasater [at] gmail [dot] com)

The Davis Street Ferry went from Carondelet in St. Louis City to East Carondelet, IL. St. Louis County was not part of the equation.

Red Bridge (Missouri)
Posted December 8, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Good to know Clark - looked a little off limits, and was essentially told as so, will head up to check out old trail path

Red Bridge (Missouri)
Posted December 8, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

West end leads to Minor Park where you can still see the path worn by wagons heading up the hill after coming through the ford as they moved along the Santa Fe Trail. Not private at all--enjoy.

Posted December 8, 2017, by Anonymous

New bridge opened to traffic 9-1-17.

Red Bridge (Missouri)
Posted December 8, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Visited today posted photos of the new urban walkway that has been created along the bridge, the west end quickly dead ends into private land now. Love locks have taken over the railings and other miscellaneous spots all over the bridge there must be thousands of them now. Fresh coat of paint, looking good, great attraction for the county and Minor Park.....Mr. Truman would be proud still

Posted December 8, 2017, by Jeremy (jeremyjhill [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks for the comments and the information/education. I'll try to get some pictures this weekend and I'll post them back here.

Posted December 6, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

aaah....good stuff. Love the story.

Posted December 6, 2017, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

The county GIS website doesn't show this road, suggesting that it is private:

https://map.sccmo.org/Main/viewers/desktop/

The old series MoDOT map of St. Charles County does show this road, but uses the dotted line symbol for a private road.

The new series MoDOT map does not show this road:

http://modot.org/newsandinfo/CountyMaps.htm

This bridge is not listed in the National Bridge Inventory.

The Census Bureau's TIGER dataset does not show this road -- which is rather odd since it includes both public and private roads.

Google Maps does label this road as Bastean Road, but I believe that's a mistake. The county GIS map shows another Bastean Road to the east leading to a subdivision, and that is a public road. It appears that Google Map is confused, which is not that unusual.

All signs point to this being a private drive.

Posted December 6, 2017, by K. Allen Ballard (speedeeprint [at] gmail [dot] com)

Last time I was here the sign at Rt P entrance claimed it was a private drive. I have a fellow rail fan who said owner has called county sheriff on anyone on this road. That was 10 yrs ago. Dead end road but pretty sure it is maintained by county. At the north end of this road was a 2nd bridge (at one time) over Big Creek StL&HRR Bridge No. 116, from there the RR went to Owen. Big Creek was a 62' Thru girder w a 13 pile approach on one end and a 12 pile approach on the other.

Posted December 6, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Private property per the county GIS. Owner contact info can be found there as well.

Posted December 6, 2017, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I donít necessarily buy that this is a private bridge. I know some landowners like marking property that isnít theirs. If google has an actual name for the road, I would assume that the road still shows up as public on recent GIS surveys, to the best of my knowledge.

Posted December 6, 2017, by K. Allen Ballard (speedeeprint [at] gmail [dot] com)

At the moment, this is the best photo I have. This is a digital scan of an old school photo I took in 2009. Hopefully, I can get a better one(s) in the near future.

Posted December 6, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

For those interested in a detailed discussion of bridge types and other information, head on over to Nathan Holth's page:

http://historicbridges.org/info/intro/index.htm

This link will provide discussions of overall design as well as detail/assembly design.

Posted December 6, 2017, by Michael Quiet (mquiet [at] gmail [dot] com)

It sounds like it might have been shortened to fit this crossing, as that would explain the extra bridge parts lying around. That would also explain why this only has 1 set of counters (if it was the first panel of a longer pratt pony), and also why its disproportionately tall for being such a short span.

Jeremy, if you can ever snag a picture or two of that parts pile that would surely help with figuring out the story behind this. In any event its certainly a neat little bridge!

Posted December 5, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Jeremy:

Truss types can be a bit confusing. I will try to find a chart and post it here. For some reason my smart phone is being difficult tonight and not letting me attach a link. If you have any questions about identifying truss types, the folks on here will be glad to help you out.

When I was first looking at bridges as a teenager, I really didn't know what I was doing. At that time I did not know a pin connected truss from a riveted one. It is all a learning process.

Posted December 5, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

There are also two fords shown on the 1982 Bruner quad, one on each of the roads leading from the bridge site toward the schools.

Posted December 5, 2017, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

I tracked down a map from 1939 which shows a Sherrow School located about a mile east of the original bridge site. (I've circled the bridge in red.) There was also a Roberts School located to the southeast. So the Sherrow Ford name makes sense.

Posted December 5, 2017, by Jeremy (jeremyjhill [at] gmail [dot] com)

Also, the lady gave us the name Sherrow Ford bridge, if that means anything to anyone. Not sure if that means anything to anyone...

Posted December 5, 2017, by Jeremy Hill (jeremyjhill [at] jmark [dot] com)

Thanks for the kind words. Unfortunately, I'm not well educated about the bridge types and, frankly, I didn't even know that these older bridges existed until I bought this property and this bridge was on it. So the talk about five panel pratts and queenposts frankly go over my head. Sorry. Here's what I know:

I bought the property last year. The gentleman who put the bridge here died a few years ago and I bought the place from his kids who don't have any info about provenance.

My wife visited a local feed store a couple weeks ago and was visiting with the person behind the counter and when she found out where we lived, she gave us the location of where the Bridge came from, and the name "Roberts Ford". That's how I found this listing on BridgeHunter.com (mainly through googling) and some old google image searches. The timelines that the person at the feed store gave us line up with the rough timeframes that I know the gentlemen who passed away was working on the property (he also completely renovated the 1880 farmhouse that we live in around the same time). That is all to say that I don't have concrete proof that this is the same bridge, but I have local folks telling me it is, and circumstantial and anecdotal evidence that it likely is.

Also, the original location for Roberts Ford is only about 5 miles (give or take) from my house where the bridge is now.

I'll add that there is a big mess of unused bridge parts under a tree on the property. I'm assuming they are parts that the guy didn't use. If anyone on here is local(ish) and has a desire to see what is here, feel free to contact me.

Thanks!

Posted December 5, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Maybe he only took one of the two spans. Also, as Robert keenly noted, the diagonals are not in an "X" in the center panel, so as a result of this, it looks to me like a five panel Pratt truss could have been shortened into the Queenpost we see here. As I understand, diagonal members are "optional" bracing members in a Queenpost. I think some covered bridges and roof trusses omit diagonals. Most steel truss Queenpost bridges have them, but I think they are more like counters rather than diagonal members. So I think this bridge as configured probably still provides a Queenpost function even with the unusual diagonal situation.

Posted December 5, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Very nice that we have pictures. Thanks Jeremy!

The description is of a pair of five panel Pratts. The picture is not one. Can anyone reconcile this?

Posted December 5, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Michael:

Thanks for the information. This is interesting stuff. If you want a bridge like this in your driveway, you might want to move to the Midwest - there are a few privately owned bridges out there still.

Posted December 5, 2017, by Michael Quiet (mquiet [at] gmail [dot] com)

Robert,

In a Queenpost layout, the diagonals aren't critical to overall function of the bridge, so you can get away with a configuration like this. Without them, the verticals act solely in tension for supporting the load applied to the deck. It creates a more uneven application of stress to the endposts like this, but it still works fine. Quite a few covered Queenposts have empty center panels as well.

I wish my driveway had one of these :)

Posted December 4, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Very interesting. I am glad this one got saved. It is an awesome Queenpost!

I am intrigued at how it is functioning with two pairs of diagonals missing.

Posted December 4, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Nice Jeremy! Thanks for Sharing.

Posted December 4, 2017, by Jeremy (jerem)

Here are a few pictures taken today. I hope they are found to be of value.

Posted December 4, 2017, by Neil Krout (kickinpony [dot] 66 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Went to this bridge today, and it is closed. I'm not sure if it's a temporary closure, or not.

ASB Bridge (Missouri)
Posted December 2, 2017, by Justin

Kelly, the person was shitposting/not being serious.

ASB Bridge (Missouri)
Posted December 2, 2017, by Kelly McClanahan

The bridge's name is, and always will be the ASB -- Amour, Swift, and Burlington. We should not change the name of the bridge because the railroad -- which in some sense is the same railroad -- because the railroad has changed it identity. As for the removal of the old road deck, perhaps another bit of insight on the matter. Unless the it is being used, and properly maintained, it can (and will become) a hazard. Take the old 83rd Street Bridge over I 435. It was removed for two reasons -- one it was not being used, and secondly, people where throwing stuff off it. It would perhaps be a good idea, if the light rail was ever extended over the River, that using the upper deck would be a good idea. But more often than not, there reason bridges are torn down is because of one thing M-O-N-E-Y. It is expensive to keep certain old bridges in operation, and sometimes sadly, it is better to replace, rather than repair.

Posted November 29, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

I think folks here would enjoy a few pictures from the side and some close up pics of the connections, as well as an idea of where it's currently located. You own a nice piece of history.

Posted November 29, 2017, by Jeremy (jeremyjhill [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thank you for the info!

Posted November 27, 2017, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

Jeremy,

I'm attaching the page from the 1996 Missouri Historic Bridge Inventory about this bridge. Most of the info you probably already know, but it does give references to three entries in the county court records which mention the original construction of the bridge. If you can track down those sources at the county courthouse, they may shed some light on the early history of the bridge.

Posted November 27, 2017, by Jeremy (jeremyjhill [at] gmail [dot] com)

Does anyone know where one could find more information about this bridge - like old pictures or anything historical? The bridge was sold to a private party who put it on the property that I currently own. The original pony truss bridge is now part of my driveway, and I'm looking for any kind of historical context around it. TIA!

Posted November 27, 2017, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

MODOT announced on 27 November the bridge is being restriped for one-lane traffic due to deteriorating conditions.

Posted November 26, 2017, by Anonymous

Bridge to be replaced in 2018.

Posted November 26, 2017, by Anonymous

Bridge to be replaced in 2018.

Posted November 26, 2017, by Anonymous

Bridge to be replaced in 2018

ASB Bridge (Missouri)
Posted November 25, 2017, by Anonymous

I am not Royce.

ASB Bridge (Missouri)
Posted November 25, 2017, by Justin

Shitposting because your naming got pointed out doesn't help your argument, Royce, it only makes you look worse.

ASB Bridge (Missouri)
Posted November 25, 2017, by Anonymous

Can we please change this one to BNSF - Missouri River Bridge?????

Posted November 19, 2017, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

So the county got 80% of the demolition cost subsidized but none of the repair cost would have been shared. Now that it has been destroyed they hope for it's status to be changed so state funding can help to pay for building a new bridge?

I wounder if the contractors have any input in how the state categorizes these projects?

Posted November 19, 2017, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

The website is designed so that any registered user can update the bridge entry. If what anonymous says is true then why did he not change the entry? Maybe he is just trying to force the web-master to do all the work?

Posted November 18, 2017, by Anonymous

Bridge to be replaced 2018

Posted November 18, 2017, by Anonymous

Bridge to be replaced 2018

Posted November 18, 2017, by Anonymous

bridge to be replaced in 2018

Posted November 18, 2017, by Anonymous

Bridge to be replaced in 2019

Posted November 18, 2017, by Anonymous

Bridge to be replaced in 2018.

Posted November 18, 2017, by Anonymous

Bridge to be replaced in 2018.

Posted November 18, 2017, by Anonymous

Bridge replacement started in 11/2017

Posted November 18, 2017, by Anonymous

Bridge has been replaced as of 11/2017

Posted November 16, 2017, by Kenny Fairhurst

The bridge was demolished by MoDOT and was never replaced, unfortunately.

Posted November 16, 2017, by Rob Tayloe (shadowcaver [at] gmail [dot] com)

Not good to hear about a fire on the bridge. Hope the structural integrity of the steel has not been compromised.

Following from the Osage County Sheriff Department:

Gascondy Bridge Fire Update

The Osage County Sheriff's Office has asked for the assistance of the Missouri State Fire Marshal's Office with the investigation of the fire yesterday evening with the old railroad bridge spanning the Gasconade River known as the Gascondy Bridge.

Based on the initial investigation, it does not appear to be suspicious in nature. Workers were working on the bridge yesterday with metal cutting torches.

We are going to conduct a complete investigation in order to rule out any criminal activity.

Posted November 15, 2017, by Luke

John, photo 16 was published in Volume 35 of the trade journal Railway Age prior to modern copyright laws, and as such is in the Public Domain.

While not a *current* picture, it is legal to reuse.

Posted November 15, 2017, by John Brown (john [dot] brown [at] tvstl [dot] com)

Does anybody have an image of the bridge we can use on Fox 2 News in St. Louis today? Thanks

Posted November 15, 2017, by marcosg (marcosg_777 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Glad to hear it's not too serious. I just happened to be looking at this bridge on Maps and coincidently it burned..

Posted November 15, 2017, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I'm hoping that the trail does work out. Would be a great way to preserve a lot of these nice bridges. Also, probably the only thing at this point that could put a town like Belle back on the map.

Posted November 15, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The fire is unfortunate but not devastating. It's almost certain the surface would have been replaced anyway as a part of the trail conversion. It's unlikely the heat was enough to reduce the strength enough to matter for bikes and walkers.

With luck access to the deck will be reduced and there will be fewer 1D10T errors.

Posted November 15, 2017, by Luke
Posted November 10, 2017, by Kenny Fairhurst (dwf0403 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I remember when I was taking a hike in the area and I came across this trestle. A train was rolling by at the time.

Posted November 8, 2017, by Anonymous

I believe that photos 9 and 10 are of a different bridge downstream.

Posted October 27, 2017, by Michael Quiet (mquiet [at] gmail [dot] com)

Julie, you can count me in for any projects up here in New England! I can think of quite a few gems that need restoration/preservation up here, and I'd be happy to team up to make sure we don't loose 'em!

Posted October 26, 2017, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

If you are in the neighborhood on November 5, stop by and become a part of this project. It will take a lot if it is to be saved. We kick it off then. More information here. James Baughn, we are in your neck of the woods. We have bridge projects going in three states now. I believe if regional bridge hunters joined us we could expand and save more bridges. It is going to take more than just us and the gang, that's for sure. This is a great project for size and economic development. We need everybody to generate ideas that generate action. Photo Credit PixByJax with permission.

https://www.facebook.com/rte66gasconderiverbridgerehab/

Posted October 24, 2017, by Kent Pillatsch (kentpil [at] aol [dot] com)

Toured the battlefield and found this bridge. Wondering what year it was built?

Posted October 19, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I like this one...

Posted October 17, 2017, by tillerman

bridge to be replaced in 2018

Posted October 17, 2017, by tillerman

Bridge is being replaced in 2017

Posted October 17, 2017, by tillerman

Bridge to be replaced in 2018

Posted October 17, 2017, by tillerman

Bridge has been replaced

Posted October 17, 2017, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Grinnell, IA - Holt, MI - Hazelgreen, MO

Please join us as we as we launch the Gasconade River Bridge Rehabilitation Project.†

The North Skunk River Greenbelt Association (NSRGA)/ Workin' Bridges has been given the green light by the Missouri Department of Transportation(MoDOT) for a conceptual agreement to begin the fundraising efforts to actually restore the Gasconade River Bridge at Hazelgreen, Missouri. A new by-pass bridge has been designed and will be constructed in 2018 which left the historic bridge at risk for demolition. The Rte 66 Gasconade River Bridge Guardians have lead the effort for preservation and MoDOT agreed to let the efforts begin to find the funding required. Let me be clear, the historic bridge is still at risk for demolition unless sufficient funding for restoration can be acquired in the next fourteen months.

The four spans of the Gasconade River Bridge include two Parker Trusses, one Pratt truss and a Warren Pony Truss, built in 1923 and designed by MoDOT engineers. A current engineering estimate by MoDOT estimated repair work at over $3 million dollars. The Workin' Bridges qualified engineers and craftsmen will assess the bridge for possible phased options and costs that may differ from MoDOTs assessment. These real numbers, captured as Scope of Work and Estimates are required so that informed decisions can be made, for potential grants. Work with MoDOT on a risk management plan for their new bridge and the Interstate 44 bridge is being negotiated. We have proposed a Trust Account that would be in place for a catastrophic event, as well as utilizing the interest for future biannual inspections and site and security.

Developers are also being sought for this property and any design ideas are welcome. Route 66 has always been a mecca for travelers worldwide and with this bridge repaired the potential for crossing on special event days may still be an option as engineering will return the bridge to its former function. For more information on how the bridge was saved and how we are moving forward together check out Workin' Bridges: Route 66 Bridge Rehab on Facebook

Our goal is to raise $10,000 in funds. Those funds are for engineering and planning. Jacqueline (Jax) Welborn has been designated the Project Manager. She will undertake the outreach for donors to help with the immediate engineering and planning needs for the bridge. Contact Jax at rte66bridgerehab@gmail.com or call her at 573-528-1292.

Then our efforts will turn to finding the pledges, grants and in-kind donations necessary to reach our $3.5 million dollar goal by December 31, 2018. That money will go to repairing the piers and abutments that hold the spans up, the stringer and roadway replacement, floor beam repair. The deck, or at least a portion of the deck will be removed by MoDOT using their demolition funds for that purpose. The lead paint abatement solution is still to be determined.

Those efforts are currently underway. NSRGA has begun the process to become a legitimate nonprofit corporation in Missouri, then the bank accounts will be procured. In the meantime you can still donate at Workin' Bridges: Route 66 Bridge Rehab on Facebook. Your donations are tax deductible to the fullest extent allowed by law.

Other questions, please contact Julie Bowers at jbowerz1@gmail.com or 641-260-1262. Check out this project and others on Facebook at Workin' Bridges, www.workinbridges.org and become a Save Our Bridge (SOB) action figure today.

Posted October 12, 2017, by K. Allen Ballard (speedeeprint [at] gmail [dot] com)

My son, Ken, & I visited here Columbus Day, 2017 (09.09.2017). Bridge still very solid, serviceable; on low use county road; located just 1/8 north of Bee Creek Pony Bridge. Picturesque photo ops abound here. We were a bit early for full fall colors.

Posted October 12, 2017, by K. Allen Ballard (speedeeprint [at] gmail [dot] com)

My son, Ken, & I visited here Columbus Day, 2017 (09.09.2017). Bridge still very solid, serviceable; on low use county road; located just 1/8 south of Cedar Bluff Bridge.

Posted October 9, 2017, by Seth Gaines (sethgaines [at] gmail [dot] com)

Doesn't seem to be posted anymore. Easy access if you park on the south end. Deck timbers look pretty good. The boards to drive on are all rotted and a lot are missing, leaving some lovely rusty nails sticking out. You can also get out on the new rail bridge to get a decent shot from the side. That has a pretty solid catwalk. Looks like most of the plaques have been stolen. Only the 'Township Supply' ones at the north end are still there.

Posted October 9, 2017, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Clark,

I agree that it would be nice to have a section for track charts like that. While the IC ones are the nicest and provide build dates; I have quite a collection of midwest railroad charts which other users would likely find helpful.

Posted October 8, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

This looks like the bridge I remember in this location. Jackson County built other open spandrel concrete arches bridges.

1917 http://bridgehunter.com/mo/jackson/gregory-blvd/

1917 http://bridgehunter.com/mo/jackson/troost-avenue/

Longview farm was built between 1913 and 1914.

Posted October 8, 2017, by John Marvig

Clark,

In response to your questions on the C&A bridges, I added the dates as they were listed in a 1970s Illinois Central Gulf track chart. Hope this helps

Posted October 8, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Is there a source on the added build date?

Posted October 8, 2017, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

The bridge appears to be maintained by MoDOT, but it straddles the Missouri-Iowa State Line

Posted October 8, 2017, by Will

This bridge was officially taken down three days ago. I do not know for sure what they're doing with the truss right now.

Posted October 7, 2017, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

Looks like an open spandrel bridge to me.

Posted October 7, 2017, by Anonymous

Kind of a far off shot, but here it is.

Posted October 4, 2017, by John Christeson (john_christeson [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Unfortunately this bridge has been replaced

Posted October 2, 2017, by Dale Dworak (Ddworak1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

We used to walk out to the center pillar along the bottom.

Posted October 2, 2017, by Susan Burns (burns4 [at] grm [dot] net)

Yes this is West Fork Big Creek on CR 436. Sad it's gone, the 1909 flood line was marked on that bridge. The mark was still there in 1993 when a new flood mark was made.

Posted October 1, 2017, by Seth Gaines (sethgaines [at] gmail [dot] com)

Absolute waste of time. If you would like to look at an overgrown culvert, here is your chance. No structure above the road, crosses a weedy ditch, seemed shorter than our little car.

Posted September 30, 2017, by Bill Robinson (modeltt [at] msn [dot] com)

Follow the link - a video of an old Model T Ford crossing the Grand Auglaize Swinging Bridge https://youtu.be/e5VUSWJYan0

Posted September 30, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Odd road bridge? Large, early RR pedestrian-crossing bridge? Brand new homes surround this one on W side, received permission to dive in behind new homeowner's place. Interesting old thing for sure.

Posted September 30, 2017, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

Looking at satellite maps, it looks as if there may be remnants of the bridge footings.

Posted September 28, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I followed the BNSF rail both ways to Rte 19 and MO-49 crossings and see it must be abandoned due to the rail being paved over at route crossings both ways.If this is true then there's a lot of rail abandoned.

Posted September 28, 2017, by Anonymous

Satellite view shows this as a grade crossing, no bridge.

Posted September 26, 2017, by Phil Duff (duffphil [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Bridge Rally

October 7, 2017 at 9:30am at the bridge.

Hard to believe the bridge has been closed a year.

Please join us to share stories, news and new information, if any.

There is a public Facebook invite for this event as well:

https://www.facebook.com/events/1516037185148197/

Posted September 26, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

From the lack of road in the older topo it looks like someone is using a culvert for a creek as a passage for vehicles.

Posted August 29, 2017, by K. Allen Ballard (speedeeprint [at] gmail [dot] com)

There is a duplicate page for this bridge; this is actually CR141, 117 is farther west. Visited here August 21, 2017. Bridge has been completely rebuilt in recent years.

Posted August 26, 2017, by John Marvig

As a civil engineering student, I find the process of replacing it fascinating. Because this line sees a train approximately every 5-10 minutes in this spot, minimizing closures is critical. As a result, the replacement involves constructing the new trusses and switching them out using large platforms.