Rating:
3 votes

First Jefferson City Bridge

Photos 

Postcard

This color postcard shows automobiles crossing the bridge.

BH Photo #104830

Map 

Street View 

Facts 

Overview
Lost through truss swing bridge over the Missouri River at Jefferson City
Location
Jefferson City, Cole County, Missouri, and Callaway County, Missouri
Status
Replaced by the current US 54 bridge, but vestiges of south approach remain at end of Bolivar Street
History
Opened Oct. 15, 1896; demolished 1955
Builders
- A.J. Tullock of Leavenworth, Kansas (Contractor)
- J.A.L. Waddell of Port Hope, Canada (Engineer)
Design
Swing Pratt through truss
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 440.0 ft.
Approximate latitude, longitude
+38.58612, -92.17640   (decimal degrees)
38°35'10" N, 92°10'35" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
15/571731/4271170 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Jefferson City
Land survey
T. 44 N., R. 11 W., Sec. 7
Inventory number
BH 21320 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • March 25, 2017: Updated by Luke: Added builder
  • August 6, 2016: New Street View added by Dana and Kay Klein
  • September 24, 2011: Photo imported by James Baughn
  • January 1, 2011: New photo from Mark Frazier
  • May 1, 2008: New photo from David B. Haun
  • April 17, 2006: Posted additional photo from Wayne Johnson

Related Bridges 

Sources 

Comments 

First Jefferson City Bridge
Posted March 4, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Nice views of Jeff City Bridge here

First Jefferson City Bridge
Posted May 7, 2006, by Anonymous

The old bridge crossing the Missouri River at Bolivar Street from Jefferson City to Southern Callaway County was quite unique. The main span of three spans, nearest to Jefferson City on the South side of the river, was supported by a single, round column and was identifiable by the larger superstructure. It was on this single column that the main span of the bridge would rotate 90 to allow boat traffic to pass through due to the limited clearance between the substructure and the river surface. This rotation was effected by a diesel engine below the bridge surface providing power to rotate the deck of the main span. Due to the limited size of the diesel engine, rotation of the bridge was slow and in some cases motor traffic could be disrupted for as long as 45 minutes. Until approximately 1935 the bridge was owned by the JC Bridge Company and a toll was charged to cross the river. In approximately 1935, the bridge was acquired by the Missouri Highway Department and all tolls were dropped. Shortly thereafter a larger diesel engine to rotate the span was installed as well as a control house located in the upper portions of the superstructure of that main span. Shorter rotation times resulted and scheduled opening times decreased the frequency and duration of interruption of bridge traffic. The bridge was replaced in the mid-1950's and was finally torn down in 1958.