Rating:
5 votes

Grandin Bridge

Map 

Street View 

Facts 

Overview
Lost concrete tee beam bridge over Middle Fork of Little Black River on MO 21 in Grandin
Location
Grandin, Carter County, Missouri
Status
Replaced by a new bridge
History
Built 1927; replaced 2011
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 32.5 ft.
Total length: 98.1 ft.
Deck width: 20.0 ft.
Approximate latitude, longitude
+36.83047, -90.82274   (decimal degrees)
36°49'50" N, 90°49'22" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
15/694166/4078278 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Grandin
Land survey
T. 25 N., R. 2 E., Sec. 11
Inventory numbers
MONBI 5029 (Missouri bridge number on the National Bridge Inventory)
BH 47742 (Bridgehunter.com ID)
Inspection (as of 12/2010)
Deck condition rating: Satisfactory (6 out of 9)
Superstructure condition rating: Poor (4 out of 9)
Substructure condition rating: Satisfactory (6 out of 9)
Appraisal: Structurally deficient
Sufficiency rating: 49.3 (out of 100)
Average daily traffic (as of 2010)
898

Update Log 

  • November 26, 2013: Updated by Clark Vance: Noted replacement
  • January 18, 2011: Updated by David Backlin: Scheduled for Replacement May 2011
  • January 18, 2011: Added by Sheldon Wiens

Sources 

  • Sheldon Wiens
  • David Backlin - us71 [at] cox [dot] net
  • Clark Vance - cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com

Comments 

Grandin Bridge
Posted January 19, 2011, by Sheldon Wiens (sheldon_wiens77 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I might travel here when I'm completely out of high school to photograph the new bridge. I'm still in my high school age. My 20th birthday will be September 3, 2013. When I'm that age and older, my folks will let me travel far places to photograph. So hopefully I won't miss it.

Grandin Bridge
Posted January 19, 2011, by Anthony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Yes, this span is definitely worthy of documentation before it is replaced. Like has been stated before here..... they might not be the most glamorous, but they represent a specific type of structure that is no longer produced. I have managed (somewhat) to come out of my deeply seeded "truss happy" world and find merit and respect for some of these more simple structures.

Let's add more like this one Sheldon!

Grandin Bridge
Posted January 19, 2011, by Jason Smith (JDSmith77 [at] gmx [dot] net)

You know, Sheldon, I have to agree with you regarding the fact that this bridge is definitely historic. However, this bridge is definitely worth getting some photos of, if you get a chance to travel there before it is replaced in May. Looking forward to your photos.

And Raymond: Any bridge built from 1961 and up is definitely considered modern. 1920 is historic, regardless of bridge type.

Grandin Bridge
Posted January 19, 2011, by Sheldon Wiens (sheldon_wiens772hotmail [dot] com)

I'm glad I updated this bridge in time before it would get demolished and replaced. This bridge might need some photos of the demolition and construction because it definitely wouldn't appear on streetview.

Grandin Bridge
Posted January 19, 2011, by Sheldon Wiens (sheldon_wiens77 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Thank you! I am glad that I actually found a historical structure.

Grandin Bridge
Posted January 19, 2011, by Robert Scoggin (robert [dot] scoggin [at] arkansashighways [dot] com)

I agree, good job Sheldon. While not all of these types are going to eligile to the National Register most of them are 50 year or older. We are currently working on our newest inventory in Arkansas and a number of these types of bridges will be on it.

Grandin Bridge
Posted January 19, 2011, by Matthew Lohry

Raymond,

This is definitely historic.

Grandin Bridge
Posted January 19, 2011, by Michael Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] odot [dot] state [dot] or [dot] us)

I decided that commenting on freeway overpasses and modern bridges was just a waste of my time, but I felt the need to speak up and back Sheldon on this one. While old tee-beam bridges may not be the most exciting structures, they are disappearing at a rapid rate. The technology in tee-beams is a dead technology and is worthy of inclusion. It may be safe to say you will not see many plain reinforced concrete bridges constructed today. Pre-stressed pre-cast concrete is just too economical to justify a cast in place simple beam bridge.

I have posted a fair number of 1920's and 1930's era tee beam structures in Oregon and Washington. However, I do believe that these structures may have slightly more historical significance on the west coast since our transportation history is a little shorter than those of mid-western and eastern states. I personally see no problem with posting an original example of a tee beam bridge (original rail and details).

A bridge does not just have to be a truss or an arch to be historic; however overpasses and culverts are definitely not.

Grandin Bridge
Posted January 19, 2011, by Sheldon Wiens (sheldon_wiens77 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Yes, it certainly is! This bridge is a 1920 bridge, and has lots of historical value to it.

Grandin Bridge
Posted January 19, 2011, by Sheldon Wiens (sheldon_wiens77 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Thank you very much, guys!

Grandin Bridge
Posted January 18, 2011, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

These were common enough when new but are disappearing rapidly. When you are lucky enough to find one intact it's like driving back into the depression and seeing the world as it was 70 years ago.

Grandin Bridge
Posted January 18, 2011, by Robert Thompson

I like this one, Sheldon. Good work!!