Rating:
3 votes

KCS - Auxvasse Creek Bridge

Photos 

Overview

Photo taken Nov. 2006 by Wayne Johnson

BH Photo #104211

Map 

Facts 

Overview
Massive steel trestle over Auxvasse Creek on Ozark Valley Railroad, north of Kingdom City
Location
Callaway County, Missouri
Status
Open to railroad traffic
Railroads
- Chicago & Alton Railroad (C&A)
- Illinois Central Railroad (IC)
- Kansas City Southern Railway (KCS)
Design
Deck plate girder
Approximate latitude, longitude
+38.97582, -91.91098   (decimal degrees)
38°58'33" N, 91°54'40" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
15/594333/4314657 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Kingdom City
Inventory number
BH 21026 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • February 27, 2013: Updated by Luke Harden: Corrected name.
  • November 18, 2008: New photos from Nathan Morton
  • December 7, 2006: Posted photos from Wayne Johnson

Sources 

  • Wayne Johnson - johnsonwe [at] embarqmail [dot] com
  • Nathan Morton - morton890 [at] yahoo [dot] com
  • Luke

Comments 

KCS+Auxvasse+Creek+Bridge
Posted May 4, 2014, by Troy+Higgenbotham (troyhiggenbotham%40rocketmail [dot] com)

Is+there+any+way+I+can+buy+a+couple+18x24+photos+of+this+trestle.++I+would+like+a+great+side+view+showing+the+underneath+trusses+and+one+on+top+looking+down+the+rail+across+the+trestle.+++

KCS Auxvasse Creek Bridge
Posted October 23, 2013, by Matt Lohry

Indeed; looks like a Ford L-series or a Sterling hood.

KCS Auxvasse Creek Bridge
Posted October 23, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Its probably one of those trucks with additional special railroad style wheels on it. Would love to own one.

KCS Auxvasse Creek Bridge
Posted October 23, 2013, by Fmiser (fmiser [at] gmail [dot] com)

Steve - you drove across the railroad bridge? Out of curiosity, what were you driving?

KCS Auxvasse Creek Bridge
Posted October 23, 2013, by Steve (stevekatkus [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I just went out here the other day. It was nice! Got to drive across the bridge too! FYI- There are thousands of wasps living in the ties!

Auxvasse Creek Railroad Bridge
Posted June 28, 2010, by Gene Westhues (ewesthues [at] centurylink [dot] net)

Back in 1953 I was told that this was the tallest all wood trestleever built. Since its initial construction changes were made in the substructure so its distinction as the tallest no longer applies

Auxvasse Creek Railroad Bridge
Posted September 11, 2009, by jack (jackkav [at] sbcglobal [dot] net)

it looks abandoned

Auxvasse Creek Railroad Bridge
Posted April 21, 2009, by David Yates (david_y [at] bellsouth [dot] net)

This line has been commercially inactive since 2004.

Auxvasse Creek Railroad Bridge
Posted March 4, 2008, by Miss Remick Bloss (madirea1 [at] netscape [dot] com)

Hello,

This particular trestle reminds me of the one located about 20 miles northwest of Chattanooga, TN. Unfortunately, I cannot find my picture. However, I have remembered this bridge ever since I saw it about 12 years ago. My mother and I were driving from Florida to Missouri, and we were rounding a bend in the highway ( I think Hwy 24, from Atlanta to Nashville). Man, there was that trestle!!!!Tall, black, and awesome crossing the road. It's possible this bridge may be in a book specifically about railroad bridges. If I can find my picture, I'll attach it to this site.

Remick

Auxvasse Creek Railroad Bridge
Posted August 30, 2007, by Mark (mpprater [at] xocket [dot] net)

I am no expert but this is one big bridge. I first saw the thing back in the late 70's and the awe inspiring thing has been stuck in my mind every since. I have been told by an older gentleman that it was the tallest in Missouri. Is there any truth to this? If you can hitch a ride across this big open train bridge then do so. I hoped that some day they would have an evening dinner cruise from Mexico to Fulton once a month or so.

Auxvasse Creek Railroad Bridge
Posted December 15, 2006, by Wayne Johnson (johnsonwe [at] earthlink [dot] net)

At the time these photographs were taken, I observed remnants of other support structures that had preceeded or been concurrent with the current supports for this bridge. It became apparent to me that this is not the original bridge at this site; but that the current bridge used most of the original, massive stone piers from the original bridge and that many of the secondary steel supports were abandoned for construction of the current bridge.

Wayne Johnson