Rating:
1 vote

Milwaukee Road Trestle

Photo 

Carver Trestle

Photo taken by Vern Wigfield

BH Photo #240846

Map 

Facts 

Overview
Lost deck plate girder bridge over Spring Creek, Broadway Street (CSAH 147) on Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific Railroad
Location
Carver, Carver County, Minnesota
Status
Removed but not replaced
History
Built 1899 for the Milwaukee Road, removed after a snowmobile accident
Builder
- A.G. Bennett (Engineer)
Railroad
- Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific Railroad (MILW; CMStP&P; CMStP)
Design
6 Span Deck plate girder on high trestle towers with trestle approaches
Dimensions
Total length: 354.0 ft.
Also called
Carver Trestle
MILW Bridge #0-126
Approximate latitude, longitude
+44.76591, -93.62825   (decimal degrees)
44°45'57" N, 93°37'42" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
15/450283/4957138 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Victoria
Inventory number
BH 53742 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • July 3, 2013: Updated by John Marvig: Added Builder per MILW Archives
  • October 3, 2012: Added by John Marvig

Sources 

Comments 

Milwaukee Road Trestle
Posted September 2, 2015, by gregg witt (gcwitt [at] comcast [dot] net)

Hi, I should have clarified myself a little more. I thought you were referring to the High Trestle when you spoke of the snowmobile accident. I'm sure there was several accidents on the river bridge!

Regarding the High Trestle photos that I submitted, the street scene photo is taken from downtown Carver near the levee looking north.

The two other photos were taken on "Snake Road" about a block north of the High Trestle looking south. If you kept riding the buggy south under the bridge on the dirt road in the 2 photos another 4 blocks you'd be at the levee.

Does this make sense?

I live at 6th and Broadway, the abandoned line for the trestle borders the north of my property. Prior to demolition in 1981 I lived in a mobile home on the corner. One summer evening I heard a crash, looked out the window to see a burning car that someone had started fire, put a rock on the gas pedal and sent it out on the trestle from the east. It didn't make it too far and crashed in the woods!

I would see people regularly crossing it in their cars, jeeps, and motorcycles whooping it up! Talk about crazy. The bridge was way too high of a liability for the railroad. There was talk from the city about trying to save it but no funds were available.

I have several of what are probably the last photos of the bridge. I allowed Mr. Lunic, the demolition guy, to access the western portion of it from my property and was aware of when it was to come down. I was in the barn (see your google link) changing the oil in my pick up when he over reached one of the large steel spans and tipped his crane in to Spring Creek. The whole barn shook as it dropped!

Milwaukee Road Trestle
Posted September 1, 2015, by gregg witt (gcwitt [at] comcast [dot] net)

Hi, I should have clarified myself a little more. I thought you were referring to the High Trestle when you spoke of the snowmobile accident. I'm sure there was several accidents on the river bridge!

Regarding the High Trestle photos that I submitted, the street scene photo is taken from downtown Carver near the levee looking north.

The two other photos were taken on "Snake Road" about a block north of the High Trestle looking south. If you kept riding the buggy south under the bridge on the dirt road in the 2 photos another 4 blocks you'd be at the levee.

Does this make sense?

I live at 6th and Broadway, the abandoned line for the trestle borders the north of my property. Prior to demolition in 1981 I lived in a mobile home on the corner. One summer evening I heard a crash, looked out the window to see a burning car that someone had started fire, put a rock on the gas pedal and sent it out on the trestle from the east. It didn't make it too far and crashed in the woods!

I would see people regularly crossing it in their cars, jeeps, and motorcycles whooping it up! Talk about crazy. The bridge was way too high of a liability for the railroad. There was talk from the city about trying to save it but no funds were available.

I have several of what are probably the last photos of the bridge. I allowed Mr. Lunic, the demolition guy, to access the western portion of it from my property and was aware of when it was to come down. I was in the barn (see your google link) changing the oil in my pick up when he over reached one of the large steel spans and tipped his crane in to Spring Creek. The whole barn shook as it dropped!

Milwaukee Road Trestle
Posted August 27, 2015, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Gregg,

Thank you for submitting some pictures! The bridge was one of the first that caught my eye when I first began documenting bridges. I'm from Chaska, so its not a far bike ride down there. I heard about the snowmobile accident while researching the swing bridge turned trail at Chaska. The bridge would have made a wonderful addition to the park on the bluff, and trail connection to the newer developments to the west. It's a shame I never got to see it. As for the build date and engineer, they came from the blueprints sitting in the Milwaukee Road archives at the Milwaukee Central Library.

Royce,

The deck truss is from an original 1872 stereo view. Carver had two major bridges. This one was nearly 100 feet high, and made up the northern skyline of Carver. The road seen under the wooden trestle is Broadway Street, and the bridge was only a block north of historic downtown. Carver is a very picturesque town, sitting along the shores of the Minnesota River, and at the foot of a deep ravine (which this bridge crossed).

Milwaukee Road Trestle
Posted August 27, 2015, by Royce (roycehaley111 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Hey Gregg,

The top picture you posted as "the first trestle" is a deck truss and it appears to run through a town not to be in a wash like the bottom trestle you posted. It doesn't look like the same location to me.

Royce

Milwaukee Road Trestle
Posted August 27, 2015, by gregg witt (gcwitt [at] comcast [dot] net)

The picture featured here on Bridgehunter was the 3rd trestle built for this span. I've attached pictures of the earlier bridges. The first one was built in 1872 for the Hastings and Dakota Railroad and believe it is the one that is seen in the background of the street scene photo looking north. The next one is labeled Hastings and Dakota and appears to be later because the structure has become heavier. This view is looking south. I don't know the date when the Milwaukee bought the H&D nor if they were the ones that built the 3rd. and final bridge. I am pretty sure the last bridge was built later than 1899. I live in the shadow of the former trestle bridge and wish like heck it was still there. I'm not sure about the snowmobile accident but know it became a huge liability for the Railroad.