Rating:
1 vote

Gale Road Bridge

Photos 

Relocated Gale Road Bridge

Photo taken by C Hanchey in August 2011

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BH Photo #210889

Map 

Facts 

Overview
Relocated Pratt through truss bridge originally over Grand River on Gale Road, now relocated to the Historic Bridge Park in Calhoun County and restored as a pedestrian bridge.
Location
Ingham County, Michigan
Status
Relocated and open to pedestrians
History
Built 1897 by the Lafayette Bridge Co.; Replaced by new bridge in 1998 and relocated to the Calhoun County Historic Bridge Park
Builder
- Lafayette Bridge Co. of Lafayette, Indiana
Design
Pinned Pratt through truss
Dimensions
Span length: 118.1 ft.
Total length: 118.1 ft.
Deck width: 14.1 ft.
Approximate latitude, longitude
+42.48083, -84.58056   (decimal degrees)
42°28'51" N, 84°34'50" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
16/698862/4706001 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Onondaga
Average daily traffic (as of 2005)
350
Inventory numbers
MINBI 33311H00010B010 (Michigan bridge number on the National Bridge Inventory 2010 and before)
MINEW 03911 (Michigan bridge number on the National Bridge Inventory 2011 and later)
BH 49437 (Bridgehunter.com ID)
Inspection report (as of July 2017)
Overall condition: Good
Superstructure condition rating: Good (7 out of 9)
Substructure condition rating: Very Good (8 out of 9)
Deck condition rating: Good (7 out of 9)
Sufficiency rating: 99.9 (out of 100)
View more at BridgeReports.com

Update Log 

  • August 28, 2011: Added by C Hanchey

Sources 

Comments 

Gale Road Bridge
Posted March 11, 2017, by gary rogers (grogers [at] fraserlawfirm [dot] com)

A real blast from the past. I recall this bridge well and crossed it hundreds of times. My father, born in 1892 (yes, that is correct) used to jump off the bridge with friends as a youth. He told the story of a stranger coming to the bridge one day on a bicycle, climbing to the very top of the bridge and diving off... then floating to the surface. My father and others jumped in and pulled him out of the water. Once revived, the guy thanked them, got on his bicycle and road away never to be seen again! My father called the bridge Stotch or Scotch bridge or something like that. No idea why but I am sure there was a reason as he was a child when the bridge was built and probably watched some of the construction as he lived only a little over a mile from the bridge (as the crow flies).