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Posted October 18, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Wow interesting find, I was not aware of this concrete Camelback! A rare 2 span with sidewalk too.

Posted October 18, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

This will give Nathan fits.

Posted October 6, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Well that's Sad lol

Posted October 5, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

This must be Ash Street.

I saw the listing that it's on the NRHP and thought, "this is on there?" - so I checked and at first I found a M-36 listing, but it said Ash Street and the Google map doesn't. But, the information checks out, so as far as street name it's just Google being funny.

Posted October 5, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Melissa,

The StreetView is for the previous bridge (thus why I've taken it back down).

I thought there actually was a view for the new bridge that was up some months ago, but either it never actually was there or I just can't seem to access it now.

Posted October 4, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Maybe not historic, but certainly notable...

Copying this article over, which notes the road hazard this has unfortunately posed: https://www.lansingstatejournal.com/story/news/local/2018/12...

The inspection listing will be wonky (it'll show the last one for the previous bridge) until the next one comes through, since construction didn't happen until the later part of 2017.

And there currently is no StreetView for the new bridge either, that only shows 2009 at this location.

Posted October 4, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

Thanks Mike, always try to sequence for history value, do Replacement, old,older. Then if necessary 1 23 4 etc.

Posted October 4, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Yes, a really cool find!

I told Melissa the moment I saw it I knew it was a Morse!

Posted October 4, 2019, by Nathan B Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The steel stringer was built in 1950 and was a standard plan bridge, but on one side the R4 railings had been replaced by New Jersey barriers, making the bridge an altered and very poor example of a structure type better documented by other unaltered structures. The bridge was replaced as you note in 2017 by a welded prefab modern (aka ugly) pony truss bridge. A weird phenomenon that has occurred in Michigan in recent years is the use of truss bridges (unlike Ohio, modern trusses are not common in Michigan) but they have been used for hydraulic reasons I believe (longer clear spans). In any case, the decision to use trusses here was a poor one, since the trusses completely blocked the view for a nearby intersecting road. It was so accident prone I believe they had to close the bridge for a time and if memory serves I believe a signal was to be installed to safely control traffic. Bet you won't find this bridge on the US Bridge Company website!

Posted October 4, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Nathan, thank you, as always I enjoy finding these long lost bridges.

Posted October 3, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Dana,

I'm confused by the name. This is listed as a replacement bridge - any idea of what this replaced?

Reason I ask is, this bridge was itself replaced by a modern pony truss in 2017.

Posted October 3, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nathan,

Just saw this:

"Bridge was in storage in Calhoun County with use on trail planned, but its parts were destroyed by a careless equipment operator."

:( When did this happen?

Posted October 3, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Glad you found a photo of this long-lost rarity. I remember first seeing a photo of this one at the Rivers Bend bar in Maple Rapids. It was a bit of a shock to look around a bar and find yourself looking at a rare Morse Bridge Company through truss!

Posted October 2, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Scratch that question, the Google Books link has a picture that clearly shows it's a two.

Posted October 2, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

I hit the delete button. It sent a request to James

Posted October 2, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Melissa, I...think? You might have the ability to delete this yourself rather than needing to file a request. You added it this entry, so I think that gives you the ability to take it down.

I've taken care of the relevant statistical info, so we should be all set here.

Posted October 2, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

I think that's all the info...although I see Dave listed this as a two-span rather than a one. Which would be correct?

Posted October 2, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Then we can strip this down and request for this to be deleted

Posted October 2, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Mike and Tony...lets move any pertinent information to the original page

Posted October 2, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

My Apologies. This already has been added by Dave King...bh64690

Posted October 2, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

There's enough of these collapses caused by overweight trucks that it's making me think that should get its own status/category. :-/

Posted October 2, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

I'm hazarding a guess that, much like the Honeytown Bridge, this too was left to be removed after its collision-collapse.

Posted September 30, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

That being an error is also possible, for example the M-65 bridge (that spawned the search that led me to finding the Google Books preview in the first place!) is captioned as being in Oscoda County when it's actually Oscoda Township (in Iosco), and there's an arch bridge crossing the Rapid River given as being in Antrim County, when it (probably) was actually in Kalkaska.

Though, saying that a bridge was relocated when it really wasn't seems like a pretty big error to make. Last minute change of mind would seem more likely. Or, similar to the examples I mentioned, it was mistaken for a bridge that DID get relocated - but if that's the case, I can't think of what the actually-relocated bridge would be. Wouldn't be Dehmel Road, he accounts for that separately in the same paragraph. Wouldn't be the ill-fated Parshallburg, that was six years later.

Posted September 30, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

As far as I know, it never was moved, or at least as far as I know its not standing anywhere today unless someone has hidden it very carefully from me! Unless it ended up in Tiny Zehnders hands and nothing ever happened to it. I know for sure its not stored at Calhoun County. I am wondering if an error ended up in the book given the book was published the same year the bridge was replaced. It was a big bridge, someone might have had a last minute change of mind to take the bridge.

Posted September 30, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nathan,

On Page 13 of Charles Hyde's book, it mentions:

"In addition, the department has relocated the East Sheridan Road bridge in Saginaw County..."

The department being MDOT of course. But suffice it to say, that has my interest piqued and I'd be curious to know more about that.

Posted September 30, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Charles Hyde's book... an outstanding publication... is a depressing read these days since so many of the bridges shown in it are gone today.

Posted September 30, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Nothing yet but I'm still looking

Posted September 30, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Heh, I was hoping for a Melissa newspaper article, but that'll do just as well confirming its replacement date. Though maybe an article will point somewhere for a build date.

Posted September 30, 2019, by Luke

Historicaerials shows it there in a 1983 view.

Posted September 30, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

The Google Books find looks to be a match to the photo that is (erroneously) posted for the M-65 bridge - any way to move that over here?

The NBI shows the bridge now at this location was built in 1984; I'd like additional verification or history for that before simply slotting that in.

On a side note, the respective book sure sounds fascinating - will go through it when I get the chance.

Posted September 30, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hmmm. Looks like that would have been where M-72 and M-33 run concurrently north out of Mio:

https://www.google.com/maps/@44.6596653,-84.1290791,3a,75y,3...

Posted September 30, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The photo posted is of a bridge once located at Mio, Michigan which no longer exists today. This webpage is referencing the pony truss. Photodocumentation is available here: https://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=t...

Posted September 29, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Photo shows a through truss.

Posted September 29, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

I vaguely remember going across this once sometime in the mid-90s as a kid. Definitely seems like there were more trees on the north side than there are now.

Took a family drive past it again just yesterday. We didn't stop here, but it did make for a real nice view as we went by.

On another note, it's kind of funny how the one photo on the bridge is from March 2017 while the StreetView for re-aligned M-65 has but one option, from 2008.

Posted September 14, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Yes CV, Mr. Coulter was good at swiping bridge plaques, but not so much at accurate documentation.

Posted September 14, 2019, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

So the site I cite is in error. I've never seen anything like this before....

Posted September 13, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The builder is a simple matter of math. Despite a discrepancy of when this bridge was built (some sources including the modern plaque on the bridge list 1893, others suggest 1897 and I do not know which is correct), the Smith Bridge Company of Toledo, Ohio was SOLD to new interests ca. 1890 who purchased the company and changed its name to Toledo Bridge Company of Toledo, Ohio. This bridge was built in 1897. Thus, it is impossible for it to have been built by the Smith Bridge Company. I even included an 1893 advertisement on my page for this bridge indicating that Toledo Bridge Company was a successor to Smith Bridge Company. So even if the earlier date is the correct one, we know for a fact that Smith Bridge Company was gone by then.

https://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=t...

Posted September 12, 2019, by Luke
Posted September 12, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

How about its page for its re-use in Lenawee County?

MDOT's page also has that given, as does Historic Bridges.

Posted September 12, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Clark, I do not, and Honestly I don't remember how the builder was added. Please adjust as needed

Posted September 12, 2019, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

http://www.douglascoulter.com/BridgeSigns/smith_bridge.html shows this as built by Smith Bridge Co of Toledo. Do we have another source showing the Toledo Bridge Co as builder?

Posted September 8, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

Deleted Duplicate. Thanks!

Posted September 8, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Bridge was demolished in 1977. I have not found a photo yet...

Posted September 7, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

I'm approximating 1977 for the replacement time; the NBI gives 1976 for the build year of the Bicentennial (naturally), but Wayne Street has served Business Loop 94 in Benton Harbor since the early 60s, so this was obviously a state-owned bridge during its last years.

It's here - http://www.michiganhighways.org/listings/MichHwysBus32-94.ht... - where there's a slight conflict in timing, thus why I'm approximating 1977. Unless, of course, a subsequent article surfaces that can pinpoint that...

Posted September 1, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

They didn't start constructing prestressed concrete bridges until near the end of the 1950s, did they?

Because with that in mind, I'm thinking this is one of those spans where the "repair" is really a replacement.

Posted August 26, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Would this be the location? http://bridgereports.com/1247570

Replacement year 1971, would fit.

Posted August 24, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)
Posted August 24, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

These photos are from when the bridge still spanned this location on Saginaw Road:

https://mcfta.pastperfectonline.com/photo/045EA3B9-72A7-44D6...

https://mcfta.pastperfectonline.com/photo/200EAED1-EF0F-4D1A...

The credits mention its now-current location on Perrine Road, but these are clearly from its time on Saginaw.

A little farther up the road, there also used to be a concrete balustrade bridge as well. It was replaced the same year this bridge was moved to Perrine:

https://mcfta.pastperfectonline.com/photo/3D02F672-7516-43E3...

https://mcfta.pastperfectonline.com/photo/C9BE11B3-8EE0-48E3...

Posted August 24, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Portal view: https://mcfta.pastperfectonline.com/photo/B2EC7D9C-33E6-4734...

Side view: https://mcfta.pastperfectonline.com/photo/891BE292-B219-486D...

The photos on these pages are clickable for better viewing. (As with the removed Alamando Road bridge, these are provided by the Midland County Historical Society, and re-published by the Midland Center For the Arts.)

This one looks to have been a rather interesting configuration - it clearly had lattice railings along the trusses themselves, but...are those steel girder pieces past the concrete endposts??

Posted August 23, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hmmm. So, apparently there was at least a second one of these, on Poseyville Road over the Jo Drain, albeit too small to be listed: https://www.google.com/maps/@43.5468209,-84.2488186,3a,75y,1...

I say "was"; it was replaced in 2017.

Posted August 23, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Well, here's what the crossing, so to speak, looks like now. No doubt the original bridge(s) were demolished and replaced with - most likely, a concrete culvert.

The photo right at creek-level is as close as I could get on foot; not recommended unless you're sure of your footing.

Posted August 20, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

There were some other counties that built stringer bridges using MSHD's unusual railing design that was normally reserved for use on truss bridges. Two examples:

https://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=m...

https://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=b...

Posted August 20, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

The Little Salt River is winding and Isabella Road ends up crossing it three times; this is the middle of the three bridges.

In checking through records, I've found up to six examples of this unique-to-the-County bridge design that existed in Isabella County; now, only two, maybe three, remain.

Nathan has a detailed look at this one on Historic Bridges.

The other one for sure is on Pickard Road: http://bridgereports.com/1251192

The one I'm less certain about is on Rolland Road, south of the bridge linked here: http://bridgereports.com/1251147 The StreetView there is older and the bridge in question isn't listed; it's probably too small.

Posted August 19, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

In addition to the now-possible view (see the latest photo), an additional off-ramp that leads to Uptown Bay City - south of McKinley Street - is to be constructed in the coming months.

Posted August 4, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

When did this get converted to/preserved for pedestrian use? Other than my best guess would be somewhere between 2005 and 2008.

Posted July 25, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Re-opened to eastbound traffic only for the time being: https://www.mlive.com/news/saginaw-bay-city/2019/07/historic...

It may go back to two-way traffic once the construction on nearby M-20 wraps up.

Posted July 24, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I mapped it Satolli... Sounds like it may or may not still be standing.

Posted July 24, 2019, by Satolli Glassmeyer (info [at] HistoryInYourOwnBackyard [dot] com)

So where exactly is this bridge located?

Posted July 15, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Central States Bridge Company was definitely the King of the Plate Girders!

Posted July 15, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Additional picture of closure, with most recent load limits visible: https://www.facebook.com/scrcroads/photos/a.604360799583703/...

Posted July 15, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Sadly, this one is now doomed. Saginaw County Road Commission has deemed this one as no longer safe for traffic and has closed it off, effective June 21, and are set on replacing it. No specifics have yet been locked down, however.

https://www.facebook.com/scrcroads/photos/a.604360799583703/...

https://www.mlive.com/news/saginaw-bay-city/2019/07/saginaw-...

Posted July 13, 2019, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

Sounds too much like the Cline Ave. Bridge in Indiana except they gave up and tore that one down.

Posted July 13, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hmmm. So if the plan was to relocate this to the nature center but instead it was still "in storage" as of at least 2012 - what happened? (Easy guess is that the grant didn't come through or there was some other kind of money issue.)

Posted July 12, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Nathan, that's an amazing history!

Posted July 12, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

If anyone is interested in this bridge's troubled history, Michigan Highways website has the best coverage here: http://www.michiganhighways.org/indepth/zilwaukee.html

Posted July 10, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

An 8 year construction nightmare with cracked concrete and sagging spans. Too much information to post but Wow. Interesting history.

Posted July 9, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

I believe it was demolished in 1989. Still looking for information...

Posted July 9, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

"...and Bay City officials want to buy it, dismantle it and move it 7 1/2 miles north to replace bridge in city that collapsed in the 1950s. Moving the old bridge will save more than $1 million, they figure."

Ha! Now that is amazing. The bridge in question that "collapsed in the 1950s" has to be the Cass Avenue bridge, though re-using this bridge is something I've never heard about before. Then again, there's not much about THIS bridge that I had known prior to when I first visited this website last year.

Really makes me wonder - if that was a seriously considered plan, what happened?

Posted July 7, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

It's plainly bizarre to me that this location remains listed in the NBI despite there having been no physical bridge at this location for nearly a decade now. Has the county been planning on some kind of replacement structure but simply hasn't been able to pay for it all this time, or what? (Even if so, one would think the location would still be de-listed, and then re-listed upon replacement.)

Posted July 7, 2019, by Byron Miller

I couldn't discern, definitively. It does appear that a new concrete "cap(?) was constructed, possibly to raise the elevation of the bridge above the water by about 2 feet. Next time there, I can bring more appropriate clothes to investigate.

Posted July 5, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Did they reuse the abutments?

Posted July 5, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Byron, thank you for the photos of the replacement bridge.

Posted July 5, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

I thought not, given the type change.

Posted July 5, 2019, by Byron Miller

Drove there, this morning. Certainly no longer a pony truss.

Posted July 1, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I love it when I can peg the builder along with the truss type! EB&ICo. had a distinctive plaque style.

Posted July 1, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Thanks Tony, I've been on a Bridge Binge again...

Posted July 1, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Nathan, you're welcome and thanks for the encouragement.

Posted July 1, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Melissa, a great find here! I have extensive familiarity with pre-1900 concrete arch bridges, and while some are remarkably ornate with stone facing like Michigan's oldest known surviving concrete arch bridge in Detroit: https://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=m... others are very simple in appearance, as engineers were not yet confident enough to incorporate significant architectural details into concrete, for example the Cooke Road Bridge in Ohio: https://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=o...

This certainly has the potential to be a pre-1900 arch bridge, similar in vintage to the Cooke Road Bridge, and thus a remarkable discovery in the newspapers, thanks!

Posted June 30, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

It certainly appears to be one. As far as the age...I based it on information from the paper but as we have found out that's not always accurate.

Posted June 30, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Ok, great. Thanks !

Posted June 30, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yup, that's it.

Posted June 30, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

An actual concrete arch bridge that pre-dates 1900? At least, I'm pretty sure given what we can see in the article photos, that it was indeed a concrete arch...

Posted June 30, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Ok Mike, is this it ? I'm in a Bridge Blur at the moment

Posted June 30, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Whoops Melissa! That's from a Berrien Springs bridge.

Posted June 30, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

The photos are a bit dark. I mapped the location as best possible after looking at historic aerial images.

Posted June 29, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

There is not much information after 1950. Idk what happened. They were intent on demolishing it.

Posted June 28, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Those articles do explain a lot.

Although, knowing that this turns out to be yet another overweight truck victim almost makes me sorry for asking. :-/ And then, knowing that the replacement only barely lasted longer than this, and that probably didn't have any destructive accidents - instead, probably simple neglect did that one in...

Sigh. Lot of sad tidings in the history of this location.

Posted June 28, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Also, it's kind of nice to know that there's actually a record of a bridge in the county dating back pre-1900, heh. I forget where it's mentioned, but - I think it was Nathan, who pointed out that no Mason County bridge "officially" dates back before 1900. Evidently they didn't keep proper records or just lost them all or something.

Posted June 28, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

I just posted the bridge that replaced this one - maybe the last article (which is of that bridge) can be moved over there?

Posted June 28, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Note on the StreetView: It has not been updated for this road since November 2008.

Posted June 28, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Perhaps this bridge should be an early cautionary tale of just what happens when you don't maintain them! Out of service by the end of 1949...eep. (Where did the previous 1929 date come from?)

The new info is a great find. Just one question (maybe two) remains now - when did they decided to give up on razing it for so long? Or did they still raze it, and the ruins were just all that was left from it until 2015?

Posted June 27, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I just want to commend Melissa for the outstanding job that she is doing adding all of these long lost spans that we might otherwise have never known existed!

I also want to remind us all how much things change over the course of 40 or 50 years... Or more. Road names and alignments change, and I have seen old roads virtually disappear. And even more important is just how inaccurate these newspaper articles can be about the where; when; and how. It is our jobs to help add to this information and change things when we have solid details that prove something as incorrect. People that live in a particular state that she has added to might have a better perspective about a bridge's former location or history. But I would ask us all not to be critical of the work she is doing because I know that she is doing her best. It takes a special skill to glean through old newspapers for hours and not go cross-eyed... A talent I do not possess!

Keep up the good work Melissa!

Posted June 27, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Funding is said to be in place for a rehabilitation project for this bridge; this one is projected to move forward in 2021.

https://www.traverseticker.com/news/four-traverse-city-bridg...

Posted June 27, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Bridge is set for rehabilitation, starting next Spring.

https://www.traverseticker.com/news/four-traverse-city-bridg...

"That funding includes ... $750,000 for the rehabilitation of the Eighth Street Bridge and $850,000 each for rehabbing the South Cass Street Bridge and Park Street bridges. Plans include everything from installing new MDOT crash-tested railings to outfitting the South Cass Street Bridge with a decorative balustrade that matches its historic design."

"Of the four projects, Carpenter said only the Cass Street Bridge is unlikely to be finished in time for the summer 2020 tourism season."

Posted June 27, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Bridge is doomed: https://www.traverseticker.com/news/four-traverse-city-bridg...

From what I've seen in articles in the Record Eagle (where you can only read so many pages before they start charging for it), this has been moving to get done since 2017, but apparently now the necessary parts - planning, funding, etc. - are all in place.

Posted June 27, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Thanks Mike. I couldn't find any information on a replacement prior to 1989. But I'll keep looking...

Posted June 26, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hmmm. Per the NBI, this location's replacement wasn't built until 1989, which I'd be a bit skeptical of at first if only for the fact that this was closed for two years in the mid-50s, as the article says.

Then again...it also gives an ADT of only 80 for the road back in 1991, and that's only up to 727 today. So, given the low traffic volumes - maybe this did survive that long past the 50s?

Posted June 26, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Melissa, If you have access to Times Herald (St. Clair County) newspapers, I am curious if you ever come across information or photos about a mystery bridge, Feick Road Bridge over Black River, near what was then called Atkins. Stone abutments remain from this bridge, and this article notes that a bridge was present as early as 1873. http://sites.rootsweb.com/~mistcla2/Old_Towns.htm I am not sure when it was demolished/replaced, although a nearby trunkline bridge was built in 1928 which probably made the Feick Road Bridge redundant. I do not know what type of bridge this was, I've never seen a photo of it, but even a textual description would be a find.

Posted June 26, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

MURDERERS!!! }:-O

Posted June 26, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Well... Part of one! :-(