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Posted October 8, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

That's a 1914 postcard? In that case, the bridge pictured was replaced in/around 1936.

http://bridgehunter.com/scripts/bridge/add-nbi.cgi?fips=2603...

I say "around" 1936 because Whittemore Street formerly served U.S. 27 in St. Johns, but from 1/7/1935 to 8/30/1937 it was off this stretch and presumably followed a different route. That timeframe may have been the duration of when this bridge was being replaced.

http://michiganhighways.org/listings/HistoricUS-027pg2.html#...

Meanwhile, Historic Aerials is completely screwy at the moment - I punch in the coordinates for this location and it dumps me in some Spanish/Portguese country! (At least that's how it looks from the language; trying to scan any which way leads to nowhere even remotely recognizable and I'm not going to just scan indefinitely.)

Posted September 24, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

The 1957 image on HA almost makes it look more like a through truss than a rainbow arch. But then...that would make sense if the design was closer to one like Baltimore's own Howard Street bridge, which is listed as a steel through arch: http://bridgehunter.com/md/baltimore-city/200000BC1405010/

As to time of removal - looks like 1966-1973 range is as close as it gets.

Posted September 22, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

My Father-in-law just passed away from Covid 2 weeks ago. Wishing that upon someone makes you as ruthless as they may have been.

Posted September 22, 2020, by Okamifan1 (battlebotguy2 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Rejoice, Matty Moroun died this July (hopefully from COVID, so he suffered like what he put this bridge through). Perhaps there's still hope for this bridge now?

Posted September 18, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Not sure it's as amusing as the guy who jumped off the bridge in an attempted suicide, only to land on some discarded mattresses... But it's a close second!

Posted September 18, 2020, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

"Whippits"? ---Whippits good!

That was the best news story I've heard in ages!

Regards,

Art S.

PS. "Whippits" - Laughing gas.

Posted September 18, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

"Whippits"? That is a new one...

Posted September 18, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Only in DETROIT... someone attempted a Blues Brothers maneuver over this bridge!

https://www.clickondetroit.com/news/local/2020/09/17/driver-...

Posted September 10, 2020, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Iím guessing there is a good chance that several of the spans, girder and truss, were relocated to this location.

Posted September 7, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

https://www.mlive.com/news/muskegon/2020/09/rusty-railroad-b...

The hope is that this won't be the only one in Muskegon to get a thorough cleaning and paint job when all is said and done.

Posted September 1, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

We need a lot more of that for sure!

Posted September 1, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Was working in and around Clio today. On my way back home up 75, saw this:

https://www.google.com/maps/@43.3276075,-83.8548845,3a,15y,2...

You can't say Bridgeport doesn't know what they have, eh?

Posted August 26, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

1. How long ago would the bowstring arch have been here? "Bowstring" makes me think it's not the one that came right before and lasted for 96 years.

2. That this design was intended to "pay homage" to that seems a bit suspect to me, if only because MDOT employed a nearly-identical design for a replacement in Montmorency County: https://www.google.com/maps/@45.0627473,-83.9008187,3a,75y,4...

...except, that replaced a concrete camelback rather than a bowstring anything.

Posted August 18, 2020, by John Berry (jberry3479 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

And this bridge is still standing. New fencing across both ends though.

Posted July 23, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Grand Trunk Railroad, for all intents and purposes, has been formally supplanted by its controller Canadian National, a process that appears to have started in December 1991. It's worth reading to try and make sense of everything: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Trunk_Western_Railroad

The bottom line for this line (along with the nearby Oakland Avenue crossing), ultimately, is that CN still operates it today.

Posted July 23, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Grand Trunk Railroad, for all intents and purposes, has been formally supplanted by its controller Canadian National, a process that appears to have started in December 1991. It's worth reading to try and make sense of everything: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Trunk_Western_Railroad

The bottom line for this line, ultimately, is that CN still operates it today.

Posted July 17, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

I adjusted the GPS pin a little bit - as Nathan indicated, the truss *was* where the park is now. You can even still see the former road on the south side on satellite.

Posted July 8, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

To elaborate on Mike's description the truth is the entire stone arch was encased in concrete in 1958 in addition to railing replacement. See my photos here: https://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=m...

Posted June 11, 2020, by Jeffrey Routson (Jeff [dot] Routson [at] gmail [dot] com)

The 1938 Lafayette Bridge was designed by Hazelet & Erdal, which was the successor of the Scherzer Rolling Lift Bridge Company. The 1938 plans show this.

Posted June 9, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

So, this turns out to be an interesting bridge after all. The railings are definitely a custom design.

Posted June 9, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Finally was able to make it up there today. Didn't have very much time available, so all I could get was the three pictures.

From the looks of it, about the only way it looks any worse for wear is that its "abandoned" status appears to be starting to show, as evidenced by the overgrowth around. Other than that, it looks just fine. Oh, and there's no sign of any lingering "washouts" from 3 weeks ago, at least not approaching from the west (didn't try the other side).

Was surprised by how high up over the river it appears to be up close. And yes, the third picture was taken sideways.

Posted May 25, 2020, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Saw photos of this one on Facebook today. Looks like it survived with minimal damage. Only one small section of railing was damaged by taking a tree through it. However, much of the surrounding trail was completely washed away.

Posted May 22, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)
Posted May 22, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The river is already below this bridge's deck level. Its OK.

Posted May 22, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

At the very least, I don't expect this to become a flood casualty; I'd be more concerned if things were still at a "flash flood" stage, more akin to when the Edenville Dam (north of Midland) gave way. But the wind has come down significantly and isn't particularly favorable for driving up flooding conditions any more than what there is, plus the river is also now cresting at only just over 35 feet - well down from the projected 38.

Posted May 21, 2020, by Roger Deschner (rogerdeschner [at] gmail [dot] com)

Submerged, after dam breaks upstream. Hopefully this bridge (and the people of Midland MI!) survives the flood. Photo of bridge flooded: https://www.mlive.com/news/saginaw-bay-city/2020/05/flooding...

Posted May 21, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

A resident posted to Arenac County 911's Facebook page that the road is washed out at Hale Road, so the east approach would be inaccessible for the time being. The west might be reachable, unless the Hansel Road issues just west of the bridge prove otherwise.

He also specifically didn't mention the bridge itself having any issues, so it looks like this one will continue to live on.

Posted May 19, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

With the heavy rains of the past few days, the Rifle River is experiencing a record-setting flood right now.

A few hours ago, it was reported that a 4-foot section of Hansel Road, 3 feet deep, was washed out at/near the corner. No word on the bridge thus far, but suffice it to say there's cause to worry.

Posted April 25, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Given the number of arch bridges that have been accounted for among Lansing's Grand River crossings, with an unknown span covering 1928-79...I had a hunch, so I checked Hyde's 1976 inventory.

Sure enough, this was one too. No photo, unfortunately.

Posted April 25, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Some info to add:

So, I ran this location through Historic Aerials, and this truss was long gone by 1955. After some digging, turns out it was apparently gone by 1928. That year comes from the Michigan Highways entry on M-99 (which this is today), which states that a northbound bridge here, built in 1928, was demolished and replaced in 1979-80. (The split for north/southbound traffic didn't happen until 1977-78.)

Also, the pair of bridges that are there today are the ones built in the late 70s; Logan Street wasn't re-named to Martin Luther King Boulevard until the early 90s.

Posted April 25, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

We have Gale Road (which is now one of the Historic Bridge Park bridges) just inside of Ingham County, and we have Smithville Road here in Eaton to its northwest which was added as an article find - this is, or was, the one inbetween those two. While there are multiple Grand River bridges on Waverly Road, this is the only location that is considered to be under Eaton County jurisdiction.

The 1955 aerial reveals this one to have been a truss, too, and it has a very good image - probably a Pratt, but on the off-chance an article or other ground-level image can be dug up to confirm that, I held off.

I will also note that its 1958 replacement, was then itself replaced in 2006!

Posted April 24, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The bridge in the photo is obviously only 2 spans... The pony truss in town was mentioned as having 3 spans. Yes, it possibly could be Withers Road but proof would be needed to confirm that. Constantine Road appears to have been 3 pony truss spans in the 69 imagery, but like the bridge in town it may have replaced an earlier 2-span bridge.

Posted April 24, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hmmmm. We're certain that the photo is a 3-span structure? Only 2 spans are clearly seen, and if in fact it were only 2, then Withers Road might be a match. 1955 and 1969 at that location show a 2-span structure (69 has a better view than 55), and it's definitely a through truss there.

As for Constantine Road that Nathan mentioned - the same location where replacement structure BH 84708 has been posted - I don't know. Neither 1955 nor 1969 has a distinct enough image at that location that you can tell it was a truss (at least, I don't think so), but you CAN tell for sure that the structure there is a 3-span structure.

So...I'd say that's what it comes down to. If it was 2 spans instead of 3, then it's Withers Road. If it was definitely 3, then it's Constantine Road.

Posted April 21, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Took them long enough...

Posted April 21, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Welp. Here's casualty #2. Replaced with, of all things, a wood slab: https://www.oscodaherald.com/stories/state-paying-for-luzern...

Posted April 20, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

...well, shoot. Looks like the county had, apparently, already replaced this one by the time I'd posted an entry for it last year. Replaced in 2018, per the new round of NBI inspections (and showing a new, different entry for a location isn't something they lie about).

StreetView will still show it for now; it hasn't yet updated. But in any case, here's one more to "X" off, Nathan.

Posted April 18, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Now, there is a StreetView available for this bridge; 2019 imagery has been filtering into locations over the past month.

Posted April 15, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

There's no "appears to be" about it, the caption states "Replacement replica in 2014".

Posted April 15, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Yet another reminder that being listed on the National Register doesn't carry much clout... Unfortunately.

Posted April 15, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Even the photo posted appears to be of the modern/not historic replacement bridge. Although it maintains the visual appearance of the historic bridge, it is 100% new/modern materials.

Posted April 10, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Okay,Tony.I see what you mean.

Posted April 10, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Not in my opinion George... There are way too many on here already!

Posted April 10, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks,Tony.In other words it's not worth posting.

Posted April 10, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

It's a modern MOB pedestrian bridge.

Posted April 10, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I noticed 2 things on street view.There is a plaque on the bridge which i couldn't read.Also there is a truss pedestrian bridge over the waterway along Denton Road beside this bridge.I looked on Bridgehunter and didn't see it listed.

Posted April 5, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

I'm thinking this is pinned in the wrong place, though so too is its entry on BridgeReports, because the county probably has it mis-labeled.

They have it as crossing Thornapple "Creek", but looking at both the satellite and old aerials of the location...neither shows a bridge. Go up the road to where it's clearly the Thornapple RIVER, on the other hand...

As there is only one entry for Mason Road at all, it's probably the river crossing at 42.617415,-85.05434. 1955 easily gives the best image there.

Posted April 3, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

PDF Version of Referenced Article Attached.

Posted March 21, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Both the northbound and the southbound bridges are planned for replacement, correct? Which means, the plan is probably to replace the couplet with one large single multi-lane bridge, not unlike what was done at the US 10/M-47 interchange. (Granted that was MDOT and this would not be, but still.)

Posted March 21, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks for clearing that up,Nathan.Just thought it was worth mentioning.

Posted March 21, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks for clearing that up,Nathan.Just thought it was worth mentioning.

Posted March 20, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

While i agree completely that it should be preserved, this bridge is currently planned for replacement and its questionable whether they would leave it standing next to its replacement.

Posted March 20, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The bigger bridge is over Silver Creek. I have full coverage here https://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=m...

Posted March 20, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I noticed in the 2 pictures a bridge and a culvert.Shouldn't there be a separate listing for the bridge besides the culvert?

Posted March 20, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I noticed in the 2 pictures a bridge and a culvert.Shouldn't there be a separate listing for the bridge besides the culvert?

Posted March 20, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

This would have served U.S. 41 from...somewhere around the route's inception in 1926, up until a point somewhere between 1936 and 1949. That's the best I can narrow it down, as there's not a whole lot to go on.

http://www.michiganhighways.org/listings/US-041.html

This is southeast of the town of Alberta, with these entries providing the 1936-1949 range:

1936-37: "Finally, a short realignment near Alberta in central Baraga Co shaves a mile from the route with the former route being relinquished to the county."

1949: "The realignment completed in 1948 (see above) is extended with new roadway from jct US-141/M-28 northerly to Alberta completed. The former route is turned back to county control."

Posted March 20, 2020, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

No more excuses--they need to save the few of these that remain.

Posted March 17, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Mike,you are correct.That's the bridge I was talking about.

Posted March 17, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

George,

You mean just to the right of where the pin is on the map? Might not be that old, actually. The aerials in this area aren't the greatest for trying to detect it, but the earliest one that clearly shows that even that spot exists (as it does today, anyway) is 2005.

Posted March 16, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I see a wooden pedestrian bridge from this bridge when you pan street view to the right.Can't tell how old it is.

Posted March 16, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Mike, I have looked quite a bit and have not came up with one

Posted March 16, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

In this case the NBI date seemed plausible given also that two people commented on the photo on Facebook remembering crossing this - even given memories being fuzzy, I doubt the replacement date could be pushed back very far before it's older than people could remember. Toss in what Melissa dug up, and - bingo.

Melissa - good find on the replacement opening, any chance a clipping on this bridge is out there? Who knows, maybe we might get more info out of it.

Posted March 16, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Herald-Palladium: September 10 1975

Posted March 15, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

...Because mistakes are never made in the NBI right Mike?

Posted March 15, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Melissa for the win once again! Got the clipping for that?

Posted March 15, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Opened September 1975

Posted March 14, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

One of the commenters on that photo says he used to cross that twice a week making deliveries in the 70s - if true, that would mean this is what was replaced when the current bridge at this location was built. That, in turn, means he only made those crossings in the early 70s, as (per NBI) the time of replacement was 1974.

Posted March 11, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks,Clark.Sounds plausible.

Posted March 10, 2020, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Usually they are remnants of drilled holes for the explosives used to break out the rock in the quarry.

Posted March 10, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Maybe somebody can answer this question.What are all of the holes in the blocks for?They look like they don't go all of the way through the blocks.

Posted March 6, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Also, while the bridge is signed for a clearance of 11 feet 10 inches - at least on one side still - apparently that's no longer enough:

https://www.mlive.com/news/ann-arbor/2020/03/road-closing-fo...

That article referred to Amtrak, making me wonder why - turns out this Norfolk Southern line does serve their Wolverine train on a Chicago-to-Pontiac trip.

Posted March 1, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

The Grand Jam would certainly explain a lot.

As it pertains to other bridges on the river:

-It's probably how Grand Rapids ended up with the Blue Bridge, as that bridge's predecessor (on the former GR&I Railroad) was destroyed.

-I'm guessing Bridge Street (predecessor to the arch bridge posted here) survived for the time being, as the arch wasn't built until 1903-04.

-Leonard Street (built only 4 years prior!) survived, though I wonder if that was instead lost to the Great Lakes Storm of 1913.

-The article doesn't say that Pearl Street was destroyed, though the flood must have been its swan-song in any case, as BH 74860 was built there in 1886.

-The two other bridges specifically mentioned as destroyed are the Detroit, Grand Haven and Milwaukee and Chicago and Milwaukee Railroad bridges. DGH&M - later a part of Grand Trunk Western, itself now a part of Canadian National - would be the railroad line (still in operation today) between Ann and Leonard Streets (not posted here), as to C&M...I have no idea. C&M's history on Wiki gives basically no details as to its Michigan holdings.

-One other interesting note: Sixth Street was also built in 1886, but that location isn't even mentioned; most likely, BH 20096 is the one and only bridge that has ever been there.

(Side note: I checked other Kent bridges, and the Norfolk Southern Grand River Swing Bridge is also one with spans from more than one builder, years apart. AGH! In any case, that'd be my bet for where the former C&M line ended up, if in fact the line is still operating today. If the line no longer exists today, then your guess is as good as mine.)

Posted February 29, 2020, by Don Morrison

Google's map makes it look as if Division street joins into Jackson street, and Bing maps calls it Jackson street after the intersection north of the current bridge.

Catastrophic floods on a logging river like the Grand Jam of 1883 probably took out some of the 1881 spans.

https://www.mlive.com/chronicle/2008/07/grand_jam_of_1883.ht...

Posted February 29, 2020, by Luke

It's not as unusual as you think, especially with catastrophic floods:

e.g. https://bridgehunter.com/ia/louisa/bh56873/

Posted February 29, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hyde's 1976 inventory lists this as Jackson Street rather than Division Street, but as there is no other Jackson or Division crossing in or around Lowell, I can only assume he used the town's street name despite this being (technically) just to the south. In any case, it offers the following with regards to this bridge:

"The Jackson Street Bridge consists of three steel and wrought iron Pratt trusses, resting on concrete piers and abutments, and is 17 feet wide and 291 feet long. The north span was erected in 1881 by the King Iron Bridge Company of Cleveland, Ohio, while the middle and south spans were built in 1895 by the Wrought Iron Bridge Company of Canton, Ohio."

Having spans built by two different bridge companies, let alone 14 years apart, strikes me as VERY unusual - to the point where I'm not sure I'd believe it. Would it be plausible that that did happen here?

In any case, his source on this one is MSIAS, which refers to a Michigan Structure Inventory and Appraisal Study conducted by Michigan Department of State Highways and Transportation (presumably MDOT today) over 1972-74.

Posted February 25, 2020, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Listing shows jack arch deck. It seems like a slab on stringers.

Posted January 29, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

The Midland City Council has elected to make the one-way traffic order permanent. It's said that "eventually", the road design will be changed, however.

https://www.ourmidland.com/news/article/Midland-s-Currie-Par...

Posted January 26, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Replacement replica slated to be finished by July: https://www.mlive.com/news/grand-rapids/2020/01/after-arson-...

Posted January 26, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Is there any way to get that inspection info off the page? It's associated with a much smaller stringer bridge that was from 1903, not 1913.

The error probably happened because the NBI listings have had Shaytown Road entries for both Thornapple River and Thornapple Creek; the small stringer was over the creek.

Posted January 25, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Bridge Street has, actually, been a trunkline route since the implementation of the system (whose centennial was actually just last year). Up until 1925, it was part of the original M-16 (which was never re-used after being supplanted with U.S. 16). It then hung in limbo for a couple of years until definitely being signed as its current M-100 by 1927.

http://www.michiganhighways.org/listings/HistoricUS-016pg2.h...

http://www.michiganhighways.org/listings/M-100.html

Posted January 22, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

A small bridge in an area with a lot of significance.

Grand River Avenue formerly served as U.S. 16 in Ionia County from its inception (same year this bridge was built) up until the end of 1958, when I-96 was opened to traffic between Portland and just east of Kent County.

This bridge, in turn, is one of several still-remaining examples throughout the state representative of a standard 1920s design. (Another one remains over Libhart Creek east of M-66, but is easily in worse condition, with its railings more heavily covered up and also badly spalled.)

Just west of the curve west of this bridge, is a roadside historical marker that denotes the site of Michigan's first highway roadside picnic table. This was a perk introduced by then-Ionia County Highway Engineer Allan K. Williams; the link I've posted, in addition to being about U.S. 16 in Michigan, also tells of Williams's contributions to Michigan's highways.

Posted January 22, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

The NBI for 2012 updated the build year to 1910 with a repair date of 1952.

Page on the construction of the new bridge here, which also includes a few pictures of both bridges side by side: https://www.preinnewhof.com/pn_projects/village-of-muir/

Posted January 22, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Based on this history of the railroad line, I would place this bridge as being built in or at least around 1870:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ionia_and_Lansing_Railroad

Happy 150!

Posted January 20, 2020, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I'm not really sure what this one is. Looks like it could either be a girder or maybe a short deck truss.

Posted January 14, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Portions of the stone substructure of this bridge were retained and used in the replacement bridge.

Posted January 14, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This bridge replaced a WIBC bowstring, if one of the other editors has more time than me, feel free to create its own page, photo attached.

Posted January 13, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Its probably the last highway bridge that could be found Eligible For Listing in the National Register of Historic Places however.

Posted January 13, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)
Posted January 11, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Looking around this area on HA, I notice there were nearby crossings both to the west and east of this, both quite likely trusses - one is suggestive, one is plainly clear.

Hubbardston Road may have had a through truss, it was replaced (per NBI) in 1959.

Stoney Creek Road, when it crossed the creek, definitely had a pony - the 1965 image is quite clear. This one was gone by 1981.

Posted January 11, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Both this bridge and the Ashmun Street bridge in Sault Ste. Marie (BH 20006) are products of the National Recovery Project, one of the multiple New Deal entities that emerged in effort to reverse the Great Depression.

I'm a bit at a loss for how to account for that particular project on here, though, because it's a little less straightforward compared to the Works Progress and Public Works Administrations. Plus, the National Recovery Administration, which would otherwise be my best guess, was declared unconstitutional in 1935, thus that entity lasted for much less time than the WPA and PWA.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Industrial_Recovery_A...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Recovery_Administrati...

Posted January 11, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

I wouldn't go quite so far as to say this is the last county bridge with *any* historical significance...the CN railroad bridge over M-53 is a Depression Era artifact, which is not exactly INsignificant.

It might be less of a stretch, though, to say that this is the bridge that best combines aesthetics and significance and still remains today.

Posted January 6, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

I have added the NRHP nomination form to the links for this bridge.

In addition to fleshing out the timeline for this location in more detail, it also sheds additional light on how prolific Joliet were in Michigan - including identifying a few bridges that, up until now, haven't had a known builder listed.

Posted January 6, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

That proposed concept restoration - is that your design, or did someone come up with that?

Reason I ask is, there may be new developments in this area soon enough.

Dow Chemical is proposing a settlement for a Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration action that began in 2005 (!) - as part of this, they would direct an estimated $77 million toward more than a dozen environmental restoration projects throughout the Great Lakes Bay region.

https://www.mlive.com/news/saginaw-bay-city/2020/01/dow-chem...

One of those, the Tittabawassee River Floodplain Restoration and Bike Trail, would see a few new trails created in the area of this bridge, with a proposed trailhead at the spot where the bridge is. It's currently not proposed to use both sides of the river, however (thus it ostensibly wouldn't involve restoring this bridge or replacing it with a new one).

https://www.fws.gov/midwest/es/ec/nrda/TittabawasseeRiverNRD...

The settlement is now currently awaiting court approval.

Wells Bridge (Michigan)
Posted January 5, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

On HA, the oldest available view is from 1953.

On that view, there's the railroad bridge.

To its right, is clearly THIS bridge's successor (Bay Shore Road Bridge).

To its left, are remains of piers. Those could, possibly, be from THIS bridge.

Wells Bridge (Michigan)
Posted January 5, 2020, by Greyson (greysonhansen08 [at] gmail [dot] com)

there are also piers of another possible bridge next to the railroad bridge

Posted December 31, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

The plaque on this bridge has "DETROIT & IRONTON R. R. CO." listed.

Posted December 31, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Not long after, as it turns out - it's gone, and the road is re-aligned, by 1980. So, that work was ostensibly done in the late 70s.

Turns out also that the road used to curve right here, which explains the pin position.

Posted December 31, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

That old guess turns out to be way, way off.

In fact, the earliest available Aerial for this location is 1954 - and it's already gone!

This is where being able to research the railroad lines here in Bay City would really come in handy.

Posted December 31, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Adjusted the pin on this, as per the views from Historic Aerials, it turns out this actually crossed the river at the west curve where the river turns north. The road then ran along the north side of the river going east.

Best I can narrow down the time of removal is that by 1999, it's gone.

I'd love to know more about where by Gaylord this was moved to, though.

Posted December 31, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

The last Aerial that shows this still there is 2005. The next one, 2009 - gone.

Posted December 30, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I could conceivably see it setting there until it completely fell into the stream and the county was forced to remove it.