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Kennebec Valley Trail - Kennebec River Bridge

Map 

Facts 

Overview
Pratt through truss bridge over Kennebec River on Kennebec Valley Trail
Location
Embden, Somerset County, Maine
Status
Closed to highway traffic, open for trail use
Railroads
- Maine Central Railroad (MEC)
- Rail-to-trail
- Somerset Railroad
Design
Pratt through truss
Approximate latitude, longitude
+44.95958, -69.87011   (decimal degrees)
44°57'34" N, 69°52'12" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
19/431374/4978827 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Solon
Inventory number
BH 63845 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • September 1, 2015: Updated by Luke: Added categories "Open to Equestrians", "Open to Snowmobiles"
  • October 26, 2014: Added by Ian Martin

Sources 

  • Ian Martin

Comments 

Kennebec Valley Trail - Kennebec River Bridge
Posted September 1, 2015, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Jeff,

Perhaps with your club's permission some of the pictures on your club's site could be posted on this page. It is nice to show old bridges that have been saved through the efforts of community.

Kennebec Valley Trail - Kennebec River Bridge
Posted September 1, 2015, by Jeff Ireland (trailmaster [at] moosealleyriders [dot] org)

FYI, if I am reading it correctly, you have designated this bridge as "owned by the state" and "pedestrian traffic only". This Bridge is owned by Brookfield Renewable Energy, as is the Hydro Station beneath it. Prior to that it was owned by FPL (Florida Power and Light)Energy, and prior to that it was owned by CMP (Central Maine Power). Prior to that it was owned by Maine Central Railroad. While it is closed to unauthorized on-road type traffic, it is used daily as a recreational multi-use bridge. Depending on the season, you may encounter pedestrians, Snowmobilers, ATVs, Equestrians, Bicyclists, Joggers, even full sized service vehicles servicing the hydro station. It was rehabilitated in 2008 during a project undertaken by the Moose Alley Riders ATV Club at a cost of $160,000 and paid for - partially - by the Federal Recreational Trails Program (RTP). It was stripped to the iron superstructure, and a complete new solid deck was built, complete with a horse and snowmobile friendly rubber covering. Thought you might want to know.