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WW&F - Sheepscot River Bridge

Photo 

WW&F - Sheepscot River Bridge

Photo from old postcard

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BH Photo #509407

Description 

"The 112.8-foot iron bridge across the Sheepscot in Whitefield was a product of the Phoenixville Bridge Company. It had previously been used by the Maine Central to span the Kennebec at Waterville. About a mile below Whitefield station, the Sheepscot makes a dogleg, and here the 'Iron Bridge', as it came to be known, carried the track from the west to the east bank. It had to be dismantled at Waterville and brought over the Maine Central to Wiscasset, where the narrow gauge hauled the sections on flatcars to the crossing. The abutments remain today, as solid as when they were built in 1895." Robert C. Jones, "Two Feet To Tidewater" 1987

Facts 

Overview
Lost Through truss bridge over Sheepscot River on Wiscasset, Waterville & Farmington RR
Location
Whitefield, Lincoln County, Maine
Status
Removed but not replaced
History
Moved here in 1895; destroyed by flooding after abandonment in 1933; cut up in 1937.
Builder
- Phoenix Bridge Co. of Phoenixville, Pennsylvania
Railroads
- Wiscasset & Quebec Railroad
- Wiscasset, Waterville & Farmington Railway
Design
Whipple through truss
Dimensions
Total length: 112.8 ft.
Also called
Whitefield Iron Bridge
Approximate latitude, longitude
+44.15560, -69.61775   (decimal degrees)
44°09'20" N, 69°37'04" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
19/450602/4889341 (zone/easting/northing)
Inventory number
BH 94638 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • October 8, 2021: Updated by Chester Gehman: Made corrections to location and history; added description
  • October 8, 2021: Updated by Luke: Added relocation info
  • October 8, 2021: New photo from Geoff Hubbs

Sources 

  • Geoff Hubbs
  • Railroad.net - Info
  • Luke
  • Chester Gehman - gehmanc2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com

Comments 

WW&F - Sheepscot River Bridge
Posted October 8, 2021, by Luke

💯

WW&F - Sheepscot River Bridge
Posted October 8, 2021, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Wow, this is a nice find!