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Main Street Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted September 18, 2021, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

James,

The research cycle times are shrinking rapidly as more old material gets uploaded. I think we'll know sooner than you think.

Regards,

Art S.

Main Street Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted September 17, 2021, by JIM STEWART (JAMESEMSTEWART57 [at] GMAIL [dot] COM)

THANKS, ART. THAT'S GOOD WORK. TWO OR THREE YEARS OF WORK IS SOMETIMES REQUIRED FOR ANSWERS. ALSO SOME QUESTIONS WILL NEVER BE ANSWERED. I'M HAPPY THAT MA HAS BEEN ADDED TO THE LIST OF WHIPPLE ARCH BRIDGE STATES.

Main Street Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted September 16, 2021, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Here's the 1856 map:

Main Street Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted September 16, 2021, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

James,

I don't think we can tell more than truss type by the any of the maps of the type the 1886 drawing is from. My gut is that it was already replaced by then. I doubt they found a used span of exactly the same size and by the mid 1880s, a Pratt pony would have been cheaper.

The present bridge, on a new alignment was opened in 1938. My guess that it was lost in the flood of 1937.

Also, the crossing was present in 1856 (maybe earlier). So, the Whipple bowstring has the possibility of being an early one.

I spent a it of time poking around and found/cleaned up some images. I don't think they add much info.

Regards,

Art S.

Main Street Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted September 16, 2021, by JIM STEWART (JAMESEMSTEWART57 [at] GMAIL [dot] COM)

1886 PANORAMIC VIEW OF HUNTINGTON MASSACHUSETTS ATTACHMENT SHOWS TWO BOWSTRING SPANS OVER THE RIVER.

BOTH SEEM TO BE SEVEN PANELS.

PERHAPS BOTH WHIPPLES WITH ONE BEING REPLACED LATER BY A DIFFERENT STYLE.

Main Street Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted September 15, 2021, by JIM STEWART (JAMESEMSTEWART57 [at] GMAIL [dot] COM)

SEE BRIDGEHUNTER "MAIN STREET BRIDGE" FRAMINGHAM,

MIDDLESEX COUNTY, MA

THIS IS SUGGESTED AS A POSSIBLE COUSIN TO THE OTHER

(NON WHIPPLE) SPAN OF THE MAIN STREET BRIDGE HERE.

THE THREAD IS THIN, BUT THE FLAT PLATE TOP CHORD

(EXCEPT FOR RIVET HEADS) IS FITTING. AND THE GEOGRAPHY

OF THE BRIDGE IS REASONABLE.

Main Street Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted September 15, 2021, by JIM STEWART (JAMESEMSTEWART57 [at] GMAIL [dot] COM)

FOR THE OTHER (NON-WHIPPLE) SPAN, I SUGGEST D. H.

ANDREWS / BOSTON BRIDGE WORKS AS A POSSIBLE SOURCE.

I HOPE BRIDGEHUNTERS WITH MORE MASSACHUSETTS EXPERIENCE

WILL ADD TO THE DISCUSSION HERE.

Main Street Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted September 15, 2021, by JIM STEWART (JAMESEMSTEWART57 [at] GMAIL [dot] COM)

KUDOS FOR TONY.

IN THE SECOND SPAN, THERE ISN'T MUCH AVAILABLE IN THE PHOTO TO INDICATE THE TYPE OF BOWSTRING OR ITS MANUFACTURER. IT SEEMS TO HAVE A PLANE PLATE TOP TOP CHORD WITH, PERHAPS, A PAIR OF CHANNELS.

Main Street Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted September 14, 2021, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Thanks James, but the credit goes to Tony.

I only pointed out that the far span is a bowstring (based on the shadow) but the arch itself seems to be different. Can you enlarge the image enough to render an opinion on the far truss?

Regards,

Art S.

Main Street Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted September 14, 2021, by JIM STEWART (JAMESEMSTEWART57 [at] GMAIL [dot] COM)

GOOD WORK, ART. FIRST I'VE SEEN IN MASS.

Main Street Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted September 14, 2021, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

The far bowstring has an arch that looks different than the near cast Whipple bowstrings.

Posted August 27, 2021, by Paul Plassman

BridgeReports gives the clearance below the bridge as 45.9 feet. The steel girders look like they are maybe 7-8 feet tall in comparison, so the total height of the bridge from water to roadway is probably around 55 feet.

Posted August 27, 2021, by urboi_jeff (oscar [dot] mckean03 [at] gmail [dot] com)

anyone know the height of the bridge?

Posted August 24, 2021, by Shaun Phelps (Smpone1983 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Hello. I once read that this bridge was relocated. Placed on a bike path or rail trail. In some other state. Possibly ohio. But I cant find anything to confirm.

Powder Point Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted August 22, 2021, by John Marvig

I have corrected the “Black River” to “Back River”

Powder Point Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted August 22, 2021, by Steve Woodworth (Swood4417 [at] aol [dot] com)

The bridge does not go over the “Black River.“ It goes over the “Back River.“

Posted August 18, 2021, by Michael Taylor

According to Wikipedia this bridge is NR listed.

Posted July 31, 2021, by Guy Bridges (guyb [at] yes [dot] no [dot] org)

Bridge replaced 7/23/2021 to 7/26? 2021 with a 3-track plus catwalk span.

BM - Clinton Tunnel (Massachusetts)
Posted June 13, 2021, by Matthew H. (matthew [at] secondbestpractices [dot] com)

6/12/21:

This is a very cool place - much better than I expected it to be!

Other useful information about the tunnel:

https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/clinton-train-tunnel

It looks like the local town is getting ready to close the tunnel, repair it, and convert it to a rails-to-trails:

https://www.telegram.com/story/news/local/the-item/2021/05/1...

Posted June 7, 2021, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Incorrect photo moved to correct page.

Posted June 6, 2021, by Douglas Butler

The second picture needs to be removed because it is a Cohasset Narrows bridge not Cape Cod Canal!

Posted May 15, 2021, by Hugh Mattison (hmattison [at] aol [dot] com)

May 15, 2021 UpdateL

In April-May 2021, the MBTA right-of-way area along Carlton Path has been cleared of trees. Fencing along the park side has been installed. Bridge and foundation removal is planned for June 12-20 by a crane operating from the Riverway Park side of the MBTA tracks. See overview here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=93coZWUj7xY

Posted May 12, 2021, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Nice find!

Posted May 3, 2021, by GS

Done.

Posted May 3, 2021, by Chester Gehman (gehmanc2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

GS:

Please delete my photo from this page. Moving photos that aren't your own is not good practice. I know you meant well.

Posted May 3, 2021, by Chester Gehman (gehmanc2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks, but I wanted the photo left in Comments. I know how to rotate a photo otherwise. I don't think the rotate feature is available for Comment photos.

Posted May 3, 2021, by Chester Gehman (gehmanc2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Great postcard, Geoff! It also shows the "Indian Fordway Tablet" which is still there next to the bridge, although most of the inscription has worn away. Photos attached.

P.S. Sorry for sideways photo-cannot rotate images in comments.

Coleman Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted April 26, 2021, by Bernard A. Drew (bddrew [at] verizon [dot] net)

New Hampshire civil engineer F.M. Goodhue, writing in Engineering News for 27 August 1908, praised the simple design. "Mr. Ball's reward from his invention was not what it should have been. It is stated the bridge companies seeing his bridge built so often 'froze' him out, and after regaining their market, calmly put up prices to the old notch." It was still surrounded by water when we last visited it in 2019.

Posted April 25, 2021, by shane henrich (shanehenrich [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Definitely not Brockton,I grew up and studied Brocktons history.The only place this could have existed is where South Street is in D.W Fields park between Brockton reservoir and Waldo pond but highly doubtful.

Cook's Dam Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted April 19, 2021, by Chester Gehman (gehmanc2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Art S:

I believe you are in error here. All photos are of the same location, known as "Cook's Dam" up to the present day. The earliest was a wooden covered pony truss (BH 92799) that was replaced in 1872 by an iron bowstring. In 1874 a dam upstream failed and both the bridge and the gravity dam were destroyed. Photo #3 is a stereoscope slide taken 1872-1874 ("similar bridge, different dam.") Photos 1 & 2 are post 1874 and show a different bowstring and an arch dam. All three photos are labeled "Cook's Dam." I didn't make a separate entry for the 1872 bridge since I only located the one picture of it. Incidentally, the bridges crossed Main Street. Spring Street intersects with Main south of the bridge. Sorry for the confusion.

Cook's Dam Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted April 19, 2021, by Art Suckewer (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

My suspicion is that the single truss line bowsting is a different bridge at a lotion upstream of the curved 'Cook's Dam' at a point called Dam Path. The dam is still present and seems to match.

Cook's Dam Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted April 19, 2021, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

My suspicion is that this and the single truss line bowsting were at a lotion upstream of the curved 'Cook's Dam' at a path called Dam Path. The dam is still present and seems to match.

Posted April 12, 2021, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Thanks for finding this! I moved the photo.

Wrong Photo Posted (Massachusetts)
Posted April 12, 2021, by Robert Petersen (heyrob [at] usa [dot] net)

Image #5 in this collection is not Anderson Memorial Bridge, but rather it's the No-Hands Bridge near Auburn, CA.

https://bridgehunter.com/ca/placer/no-hands/

Tuckerman Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted March 17, 2021, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I do have the ability to merge bridge builders on this website (like James did with the King Bridge Company with variant names of that company). However I don't want to do that without being sure they are the same companies, if its not certain its probably better to leave them separate.

Tuckerman Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted March 17, 2021, by Chester Gehman (gehmanc2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Luke:

I'm no expert either. Victor Darnell, in his "Directory of American Bridge-Building Companies" states that there was an unbroken chain of Springfield Massachusetts builders from about 1838 until 1901.

Richard F. Hawkins first worked for D.L. Harris starting in 1853. From there we have:

Harris and Hawkins 1867-1868

Hawkins, Herthal and Burrall 1868-1871

Hawkins and Burrall 1871-1877

R.F.Hawkins Iron Works 1877-1901

(All dates approximate)

If the Tuckerman Bridge truly dates from 1873, that puts it in the Hawkins and Burrall range of dates.

Tuckerman Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted March 16, 2021, by Luke

Posting as a comment because the builder SEEMS like a duplicate, but I'm not knowledgable enough to make the call. Would this bridge have been built by R.F. Hawkins Iron Works? Or was this an early example of his solo work and should be a seperate category?

(Paging Chester.)

Posted March 16, 2021, by Bill Reidy (caperaildispatch [at] verizon [dot] net)

The second photo, with a steam train crossing, is of the old Cohasset Narrows railroad bridge, not the Cape Cod Canal (or before the canal, Monument River).

Posted March 15, 2021, by Michael McCarthy (mikebmac [at] gmail [dot] com)

Given the condition being poor and the likelihood of replacement along with the rising tides can we strongly consider a lock system bridge? Only on extreme high tides will the lock need to be closed. Given the millions of dollars in homes along the Danvers / Beverly waterfront along along with impending rising water levels, putting in this system will protect so many families while providing a modern bridge for the next 100 years

Posted February 11, 2021, by Luke

To repeat a reply you missed: "This is why we have the forum--so we can learn from people who know local history. Do you have further information or links to newspaper stories?"

Posted February 11, 2021, by John Kaslow (Johnkaslow [at] icloud [dot] com)

The land for the north side of this bridge was taken from a hard working Lithuanian farmer and his wife. Their Name - Kaslow( changed from Kaslauskas so Russian agents wouldn’t find them and bring them back to Russia.) From the river to Rte 110 ( where Merrimack Marine Supply was located, all land on my great grand fathers farm.

Not a mention of their sacrifice yet. Why not?

Posted February 10, 2021, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

This is why we have the forum--so we can learn from people who know local history. Do you have further information or links to newspaper stories?

Posted February 10, 2021, by John Kaslow (Johnkaslow [at] icloud [dot] com)

The land for the north side of this bridge was taken from a hard working Lithuanian farmer and his wife. Their Name - Kaslow( changed from Kaslauskas so Russian agents wouldn’t find them and bring them back to Russia.) From the river to Rte 110 ( where Merrimack Marine Supply was located, all land on my great grand fathers farm.

Not a mention of their sacrifice yet. Why not?

Sands Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted January 21, 2021, by Luke

I'm sure NIMBYism had a lot to do with killing it.

Sands Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted January 21, 2021, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I was able to confirm that the reports of collapse were (fortunately) just rumors and that the bridge is indeed still standing (I wasn't able to get any pictures, hopefully in the near future). That being said, the northern/western arch is in severe danger of collapse, while the southern/eastern arch is mostly intact. I would hope that even if one arch fails the other one would remain standing, though this bridge really needs to be restored. There was talk about running a pedestrian/bicycle trail through here at one time, as this alignment is historic as one of the oldest horse and carriage routes in New England. I'm not sure if anything ever became of that.

Posted January 7, 2021, by Brendan (Brendan [at] murraymasonry [dot] com)

Hello I suggest you go back and see the replaced bridge. The bridge was replaced and my company, Murray Masonry, was tasked with cladding the exterior of the bridge with the original granite.

Rourke Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted October 16, 2020, by Doug Klingerman
Basiliere Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted October 16, 2020, by Luke

"Navigable waters of the United States are those waters that are subject to the ebb and flow of the tide and/or are presently used, or have been used in the past, or may be susceptible for use to transport interstate or foreign commerce." - per the USCG

Basiliere Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted October 16, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Huh, that's interesting. I don't know why sources are claiming that the Merrimack River isn't navigable, because it most certainly is navigable for recreational watercraft downstream of the hydroelectric dam in Lawrence (as the fact that the moveable bridges downstream of here are all operable would suggest).

Basiliere Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted October 16, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This bridge is a Strauss bascule bridge, BUT the bridge does not operate for boats and it never has according to the Historic American Engineering Record, despite being designed as a bascule by Strauss.

Source of below text: https://books.google.com/books?id=GWtOAAAAYAAJ&pg=PR1#v=onep...

"The draw mechanism was never installed, since the plan to make the Merrimack River navigable from Newburyport to Lowell never was implemented."

Basiliere Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted October 15, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Sorry I'm just seeing this now. I don't think that is accurate. Based on my observations, it appears that the bridge was made to be moveable and that the mechanics were originally installed. I'm not sure whether the bridge actually operated for boat traffic or not, or whether the mechanics remain in place today.

The Merrimack River is navigable at least from its mouth in Newburyport up to Lawrence. The Gillis Memorial Bridge, Derek S. Hines Bridge, Rocks Village Bridge, and Bates Bridge are all moveable bridges that remain in active operation downstream of the Basiliere Bridge - and the fixed bridges between the Basiliere and Lawrence are all high enough to permit most recreational watercraft through. The Basiliere does have a higher clearance above the water even when lowered compared to the other bridges downstream, which makes me wonder if the bridge did indeed ever open for marine traffic under normal conditions, or if it perhaps only needed to operate during high water/flood conditions.

The river is not navigable through Lawrence due to the presence of the hydroelectric dam and waterfall at the O'Leary Bridge on MA-28 a short distance west of downtown. Both canals in Lawrence and their respective gatehouses/locks that would be used to bypass the dam are no longer in operation. However, the river does remain navigable between the top of the Lawrence dam and Manchester, NH (with Pawtucket Falls in Lowell remaining in active operation including at least one of the gatehouses). The lock and bypass channel at Amoskeag Falls in Manchester has been filled in and therefore the river is not navigable upstream of Manchester.

In summary, the Merrimack River has essentially two separate navigable sections, separated by the dam in Lawrence. As such, it would be plausible that the Basiliere Bridge was previously operable, though it is evident that it is no longer in operation today except perhaps during emergencies, given my field observations.

Posted October 15, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The BridgeMapper.com photo here is the wrong bridge.

River Street Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted October 13, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

There is significant concrete deterioration on this bridge, especially around the abutments and approaches. I observed some severe spalling as well as cracks in the concrete. Honestly I'm not surprised given how busy this bridge is, and given the fact that there tends to be a lot of traffic idling on the bridge waiting for traffic lights to change... but it does raise some concern about the long-term future of the structure. Interestingly, the Western Avenue Bridge which carries a near-equal amount of traffic is in much better condition.

Posted October 12, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Unfortunately the solar glare was not being very kind to me when I was attempting to photograph this bridge.

Posted September 22, 2020, by William Cashman (wecashman [at] msn [dot] com)

Please can you help me. I am trying to find blueprints of this bridge. Does Scherzer have an online archive that I may search? ny help would be most desirable.

Thak you for your kind consideration.

William Cashman

Posted September 8, 2020, by Anonymous

The name of this bridge is incorrect. The bridge is the Arthur J. DiTommaso Memorial Bridge. John T. Centrino is the namesake of the road that the bridge carries.

Charlestown Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted September 7, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

As of 09-07-20 this bridge is gone.

Posted August 20, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Based on the earlier photos, it appears that pedestrians were previously allowed to walk on the bridge. Not anymore. As of August 2020 the bridge is fenced off at both ends with tons of threatening signage about "No Trespassing Police Take Notice" and the like. Not to mention that the north approach is so badly overgrown that you can't even see the bridge.

Posted August 20, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge was a disappointment. This is not a real covered bridge. This is a concrete stringer bridge with a faux wooden covering on top of it. The wooden trusses on the sides/walls of the covering are supporting the trusses that are above the deck, and the trusses above the deck are in turn supporting the roof of the structure. However, the entire wooden covering is only supporting its own weight. The load-bearing elements of the bridge are handled by the underlying concrete stringer structure.

I was confused when first approaching this bridge, as I didn't see any weight limit signs or warning signs about a "one-lane bridge". When I crossed the bridge, I noticed that it was a two-lane bridge, which is highly unusual among genuine covered bridges. I also noticed that the truss work looked modern and reminded me of the new decorative covered bridge that was installed at Quechee Dam in Vermont after Hurricane Irene. When I walked out on the bridge to investigate further, I then discovered that the cover is not part of the load-bearing structure.

Considering the fact that covered bridges are over-popularized as a whole, I am extremely surprised and frankly shocked that a covered bridge would be demolished and replaced with a faux structure. Unless the previous bridge was destroyed by flooding, which I do not believe to be the case, I can't think of any reason why a covered bridge should be demolished.

Ponakin Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted August 20, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I discovered and was pleasantly surprised that the trees that previously surrounded the Route 70 access point to this bridge had been mostly removed, and therefore the short trail is no longer in the woods and had thus been reopened. However, I was infuriated to find that whoever took all of the time and effort to clear the forest in the area had just dumped all of the tree limbs and branches in a pile right in front of the bridge approach!!

That being said, there is also a short trail down to the riverfront for canoe/kayak launches, and this was open so I was able to walk down and get quite a few photos looking up at the bridge from underneath. The bridge is in decent condition considering how long it has been abandoned and unmaintained. My biggest area of concern is that a portion of the lower chord is buckled and bent on both ends of the span and on both sides of the truss. I doubt there has been a major enough flood to rise the river level to the height of this bridge (which is much higher than the Atherton Bridge), so my guess is that the bottom chord was damaged by a large tree branch that smashed into it, likely while being whipped around by a strong wind gust. Despite the fact that significant portions of the wooden deck are missing, the underlying deck stringers and floorbeams remain intact.

The west side of the bridge, from Ponakin Road, is completely inaccessible without proper hiking equipment - the overgrowth is so extensive that I would not recommend that anyone attempt to go through there without proper equipment due to the likelihood of ticks and poison ivy.

Atherton Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted August 20, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

My site visit confirmed a lot of my speculations, which is unfortunate. The bridge and its approaches have not been maintained whatsoever since the bridge was closed in the spring. Both approaches are extensively overgrown, with the south/west approach completely inaccessible, and the north/east approach barely accessible after ducking and cutting through trees and branches. The iron trusses themselves appear to be mostly intact, although I observed at least one of the diagonal members at the east end post on the north truss had buckled and was bent. The wooden deck, on the other hand, is anything but intact. There are entire sections of the deck that are missing and have likely fallen away due to rotting. There are shrubs and weeds growing in the deck where the wood has rotted.

In summary, while the truss superstructure appears to be intact for now, the extensive overgrowth around the bridge is starting to surround the trusses at both ends. The deck, in its current condition, would likely not survive a major snowstorm or flood. Hopefully, even if the deck fails, it will not bring the trusses down with it, but I still feel strongly that this bridge should be moved off its abutments and placed on the ground a safe distance from the riverbank.

Ponakin Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted August 18, 2020, by Patrick Gurwell (pgurwell [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nick,

On the West side look for the maybe 6ft of guardrail on Ponakin Rd. At that point the old road leaves towards the river.

I would check out the Rt 70 side first, but the other side is manageable, however, in the summer, there will be a lot of growth.

This is a nice bridge and worth checking out whatever time of the year.

Ponakin Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted August 18, 2020, by Patrick Gurwell (pgurwell [at] gmail [dot] com)

Off of Rt 70, on the east side of the river, there is a parking area and easy access to the bridge. The other side is a little more difficult.

Basiliere Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted August 16, 2020, by Emil Geithner (egkg1 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I remember reading that the Basiliere Bridge has never actually opened. My understanding is that as the bridge was being built, the plan was to make the Merrimack navigable up to Lawrence (which clearly never happened), and the machinery to operate the bridge was never installed.

If I find a citation to verify this, I'll post it here.

Posted August 15, 2020, by Hugh Mattison (hmattison [at] aol [dot] com)

See 7-minute video at www.tinyurl.com/csf-beveridge. Restoration is funded with construction planned for 2021.

Dr. Charles E. Beveridge, an American social and urban historian, is the leading scholar and author on the work of Frederick Law Olmsted and the series editor of the 12-volume papers of Frederick Law Olmsted now in preparation. He has received numerous grants and awards, and has served as historical consultant for landscapes and master plans across the nation.

Posted August 9, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge has been repainted silver as of July 2020. The previous heavily-rusted green paint has been removed.

Posted August 9, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge has definitely seen better days. While it is in better shape than the similarly-designed truss bridge on the South Canal (which I have not had the chance to document), the lower chord of this truss bridge has started to fall away in at least one section, and there is visible deterioration across the structure. The wooden deck appears to be in good condition for now, but likely would not survive any major flooding events that rose the water level of the canal (it would take a major flood to do this given the flood control dams at both ends, but it would be possible). I would not consider this bridge to be "starting to collapse" as of July 2020, but it does need attention sooner rather than later to prevent it from getting to that point. The South Canal Bridge mentioned earlier, however, is a different story.

Duck Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted August 9, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

If anyone is visiting this bridge, beware. The wooden planks on both sidewalks were extremely wobbly and in a few areas were completely missing, as of July 2020.

Posted August 8, 2020, by Chester Gehman (gehmanc2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Bridge has been replaced by a Bailey bridge which is likely to be permanent as road serves a few houses and is a dead-end.

Bridge Street Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted July 25, 2020, by Chester Gehman (gehmanc2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

The date of construction of the Bridge Street Bridge is given as 1951 in MACRIS. The source of this date,oddly enough, is the date molded in the guardrail end posts.

According to Bernard A. Drew, a noted and reliable historian of the Brekshire area and its bridges, the Bridge Street Bridge was actually built in 1952, after a flood seriously damaged the previous bridge, an 1880 Lenticular through truss. The attached photo from the Berkshire Edge shows the bridge at that time. ("Bridge Street Bridge flood 1952")

(Photo by David Scribner, Berkshire Edge)

Posted July 18, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Site visited yesterday. Bridge needs a paint job. Obvious patches of rust visible on girders over the river. Surprised that they didn't repaint the bridge when they replaced the northern approach span over Riverside Drive as part of the exit 46 roundabout removal project.

Posted June 28, 2020, by nick (gujuwillfindyou [at] gmail [dot] com)

Are the trestles the same for the new bridge, or were those replaced as well?

And when was the original bridge built? Was there yesterday.

Posted June 16, 2020, by Chester Gehman (gehmanc2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Great Barrington seems to be between a rock and a hard place over this bridge, and it will probably be closed until 2023. That's when state grant money will be available to replace it. Meanwhile, to re-hab the bridge would cost in the neighborhood of $400,000, a sum Great Barrington is reluctant to spend on a bridge that will be replaced anyway. So it will be pedestrians only until then.

Sands Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted June 16, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

There has been some chatter going around about the possible collapse/failure of this bridge. I visited the site yesterday but the site is completely covered and obscured by overgrown trees, bushes, and weeds. There was no way for me to get any photos, and therefore I cannot confirm if this bridge is still standing or not. However, if this bridge has failed (which unfortunately would not surprise me given the derelict condition of the bridge) this would be a major loss IMHO. Even more reason to make sure that the historic Abbott Bridge in Pelham is protected from flood damage on Beaver Brook.

Blodgett's Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted June 16, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Replacing a non-essential (its essentially a bypass of current highway alignment to the east) bridge with an ADT of 400 and a deck width that provides two lanes of traffic is ridiculously stupid.

Blodgett's Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted June 15, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Sad ending for a unique 4-slope polygonal pony truss. Yes, hopefully the plaques went to the local historical society.

Blodgett's Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted June 15, 2020, by Chester Gehman (gehmanc2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Bridge has been removed and construction started on a boring replacement.

Posted June 15, 2020, by Chester Gehman (gehmanc2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

From the "We don't make this stuff up, folks" Department:

Seems little green men from Mars have taken an interest in covered bridges. On a recent visit to the Upper Sheffield Bridge a sign/plaque was seen marking the event:

Donated By:

History Channel's ANCIENT ALIENS

Welcome to the site of the first UFO Incident Officially Inducted Into The U.S. As Historically True.

Sculpture By: Len Momeau New Hartford, CT

WWW.ufopark.org

WE ARE NOT ALONE

Iron Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted June 10, 2020, by Steve Lindsey (stevelindsey60 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The Iron Bridge proves that even small heritage spans can become important to a town's culture. Another nonpolitical even is the annual Moonlight Madness held before Christmas. https://www.recorder.com/Streets-mobbed-for-Moonlight-Magic-...

Iron Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted June 10, 2020, by Steve Lindsey (stevelindsey60 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

In 1993 a debate took place on whether to replace it or renovate it. Shelburne Falls favored saving it while Buckland across the river favored replacement. The tourist minded Shelburne Falls known for the nearby famous Bridge of Flowers fortunately won out.

The Iron Bridge has become a social center for the the town. The June 6, 2020 Black Lives Matter Demonstration was held on the bridge. See several slides in for photos of the event. https://www.recorder.com/We-are-here-for-justice-34649360

Iron Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted June 10, 2020, by Steve Lindsey (stevelindsey60 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Recent social events. Community Break Bread Dinner held on span. https://www.recorder.com/b1-West-County-Notebook-shelburne-2...

Posted June 2, 2020, by Luke

The bridge shown in your clip is clearly different from the one shown here. The dates should be reverted and a new entry created based off the bridge in the video.

Posted June 2, 2020, by Geoff Hubbs

Art,

There's this video clip, though it may be an earlier bridge. I read somewhere there may have been an 1860 bridge in between. Anything you can add...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6eJTtOWXthc

Posted June 2, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Geoff,

Do you have any evidence to support your change? 1841 seems much too early for the bridge in the image.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted May 28, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Biggest plaques I have ever seen!

Posted April 29, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Yes seems probable it could be an arch. Multi span rigid frames dating to before 1950 are not common and I do not think the railroads built them with any frequency. Also how old is this bridge? It may predate the invention of the concrete rigid frame bridge.

Posted April 28, 2020, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Anyone else think this might qualify as an arch rather than rigid frame?

Atherton Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted April 26, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

As of last week, this bridge has been indefinitely closed to all traffic including pedestrians due to damage to the wooden deck caused by flooding. The truss superstructure itself appears to be intact, but there is no ETA on when or if the bridge will reopen to any form of public use.

Clam River Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted April 12, 2020, by Chester Gehman (gehmanc2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Repairs are completed and bridge has been reopened.

Rocks Village Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted March 31, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

It's a shame that they didn't add a sidewalk on this bridge when they rehabilitated the bridge in 2013-2014... it sure would be nice to walk out on the bridge but except during bridge openings (which seem to be rare), there is too much traffic to walk on the roadway.

Basiliere Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted March 31, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Just confirming that I am the one who posted the comment below shortly after my visit to this bridge last fall. As I've thought about it more and looked through my photos, it is evident to me that the bridge has not operated for routine water traffic in some time. As I noted, the former steel grate deck on the bascule span has been filled with concrete, and the operators tower has been chained shut. Both of these alterations do not appear to be recent. Additionally, the lack of any traffic signals or gates on the approaches suggests that the bridge is not active.

This is interesting because both the Bates Bridge and the Rocks Village Bridge downstream are both still operable.

Choate Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted March 30, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Added new photos to expand the color photo gallery. Taken by me on a cool late morning/early afternoon in January 2019

Chapel Street Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted March 15, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I noticed a door on one side of the bridge in the photo.What would that be for?

Bates Bridge (New) (Massachusetts)
Posted March 6, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

How is this drawbridge operated?I don't see a control building for the bridge.

Posted February 24, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The news article subject matter is a bit morbid, but photos of the bridge can be seen and bought (photo #6 is the best in my opinion) at this webpage: https://www.masslive.com/news/2017/05/report_body_recovered_...

Posted February 23, 2020, by Philomena Novitt (exeterpa [at] comcast [dot] net)

I am 91 years old and remember the "trestle" bridge over "Watershops Pond". I was told by my father that I was never to cross the trestle.

I did cross it one time, but went only halfway and remember stepping onto a small square platform which was there for you to get to if a train was to come by.

Is there a clear print of that bridge that I can order? Perhaps it has to come from Springfield College.

I also remember there was a local BAB's beach that only boys could use. My brothers went to BAB's. (Bare #ss Beach).

Nice memories. Great times.

Thank you.

Posted November 27, 2019, by Mark Mattson (mark [dot] d [dot] mattson [at] gmail [dot] com)

The bridge is open to pedestrians, wheelchairs, bikes, and in winter to snowmobiles via the Ware River Snowmobile Club.

Posted November 27, 2019, by Mark Mattson (mark [dot] d [dot] mattson [at] gmail [dot] com)

It is open to pedestrians, bikes, horses, wheelchairs and is open to snowmobiles in winter to the Ware River Snowmobile club.

Posted November 4, 2019, by Anonymous

Fortunately, they scaled it back. It is currently being rehabbed. https://www.kkcsworld.com/news/mbta-merrimack-river-washingt...

Posted October 31, 2019, by Geoff Hubbs (geoffrey [dot] hubbs [at] att [dot] net)

Tony...thanks for the confirmation