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Posted March 11, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I noticed the sign.Drinking water protection area?The sign would make it obvious for a drunk who had to pee,wouldn't it?Just a little humor.

Posted March 10, 2017, by Jason Hoffman (504roadtrips [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge is no longer open. The best picture I have is a still from my dashcam, and unfortunately, I don't have any better detail, as I completely missed the existence of this bridge when I drove by it, and it wasn't until I was going through the dashcam footage that I saw a bridge on the map that I didn't immediately see in the video.

The "approach" to the bridge has been removed and grass now grows there, and there's a chain link fence barring access to the bridge.

Streetview imagery along LA-182 hasn't been updated in nearly 6 years.

Posted March 7, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks Luke for the information.Settles that question.

Posted March 6, 2017, by Luke

Based on further research, there was a railroad swing bridge here belonging to the Texas & Pacific.

What threw me off is the use of multiple circular piers. Normally, only one is used on the swing span.

Sadly, the blogspot page this images comes from/the ones that show any info are invite-only.

Posted March 6, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Cliff,i think you are right.Just looked and saw 3 circular piers and 1 square pier in the Sugar Mill Chute.Good eye.Not dolphins that's for sure

Posted March 5, 2017, by Anonymous

Obank C.S. actually means Overbank Control Structure.

Was confused - had to research this.

Posted March 4, 2017, by Luke

I think those may be dolphins https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dolphin_(structure), not piers.

Posted March 4, 2017, by Cliff Darby (clif30 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Quick pic

Posted March 4, 2017, by Cliff Darby (clif30 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Quickie

Posted March 4, 2017, by Cliff Darby (clif30 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Quick shots

Posted March 4, 2017, by Cliff Darby (clif30 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Sorry for no more pictures. Got caught by rain. Apparently an older bridge crossed here once upon a time. Check out the old piers.

Posted March 1, 2017, by Don Morrison

This article:

http://www.nola.com/politics/index.ssf/2010/06/bayou_liberty...

...states that a wooden, hand cranked swing bridge was built at this location in 1941, and replaced by a pontoon bridge in the early 80s, which was in turn replaced with the current bridge around 2009.

Posted February 28, 2017, by Douglas Butler

Is this hand cranked operating bridge is the right location?

Posted February 19, 2017, by Cliff Darby (clif30 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Couple more pics.

Posted February 19, 2017, by Cliff Darby (clif30 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

As is the case west at little river, the piers still exist in the river.

Posted February 19, 2017, by Cliff Darby (clif30 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The piers still exist. Several bridges and small tressles exist along the grade all the way to feriday.

Rita Bridge (Louisiana)
Posted February 2, 2017, by Adam (741996 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This was the bridge used in the final scene of the 2013 movie Homefront. The fence on the east side was added by the film crew.

Posted January 12, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Prior to the designation of Route 71 this may have been a part of the Jefferson Highway that preceded 71. A detailed map of the Jefferson Highway might show this. 492 was definitely a part of the Jefferson Highway.

Posted January 11, 2017, by Anonymous

What route did this bridge carry, then? I don't have good copies of the old state route maps. I just guessed US 71 based on the age.

Posted January 9, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The 1932 Boyce quad shows US 71 using the alignment of 492 to the NE. That alignment may have been created in 1926 when US 71 was established.

Both the topo and google agree that this is called Bayou Rigolette. I don't know where the NBI got Marteau.

Posted January 8, 2017, by Cliff Darby (clif30 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Neat old bridge

Posted January 8, 2017, by Cliff Darby (clif30 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Sorry for no more closer shots. Was running out of daylight far from home ;)

New ugly bridge is well on its way, though this old bridge is a bit scary with the lack of modern guardrails or curbs.

Posted January 8, 2017, by Cliff Darby (clif30 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Likely another fine example of the original route of US 71.

Posted December 31, 2016, by stewart hawley (sdhawley1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

What VHF channel or phone # do you use to open the bridge

Posted December 23, 2016, by Keli Rylance (kelerin [at] gmail [dot] com)

& another from the same Employee's Bulletin. Bridge described as reinforced concrete connector of the Old Spanish Trail highway.

Posted December 23, 2016, by Keli Rylance (kelerin [at] gmail [dot] com)

There is a very good description and photographic reproduction of the bridge's bascule section in the January 1917 issue of the Employees' Bulletin of Robert W. Hunt & Company, Engineers. [public domain].

Posted November 24, 2016, by Cliff Darby (clif30 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Very neat. Been riding this area a lot lately but didn't know this existed. Curious as to the history of this bridge. Was this an old alignment of US71 or LA8?

Posted November 24, 2016, by Cliff Darby (clif30 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Bridge no longer exists. Not sure if the major flooding back in April took it out or what, but the only remains are the supports. The entire deck is gone, but the pilots still are full height. Which makes me think the bridge was a victim of the record floods. I have a photo but my silly motorcycle is in the way ;)

Posted October 25, 2016, by Brian J. Patterson (pattersonbj [at] earthlink [dot] net)

"Chef Menteur," which is part of the place-name for several geographic features in the Orleans Parish area including this bridge, is a French phrase that translates to "Lying Chief." This is commonly understood to derive from the Choctaw phrase of the same meaning, "oulabe mingo." This was NOT a nice phrase with the Choctaw, who were famed for hating liars. Depending on your historical source, this appellation was given to former French Colonial Governor Louis Belcourt, Chevalier de Kerlerec after violating a treaty with them; the Mississippi River, whose path through the Delta Region was notoriously untrustworthy before the levees were built; or a deposed Choctaw Chief whose other names are lost to history. This possibly mythical "Chef Menteur" was exiled by the Choctaw to what is now known as the Point aux Herbes" area of the shore of Lake Pontchartrain.

Posted October 17, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I grew up in Port Huron Michigan and the boats used to just blast their horn to get the bridgetender's attention! As long as it was on the half hour or hour the tender would lift the bridge.

If you have concerns that the operation of the bridge is not being conducted correctly, I suspect you would want to contact the Coast Guard as they should have enforcement jurisdiction in this matter.

Posted October 16, 2016, by Cody guillory (Codyguillory19 [at] gmail [dot] com)

To whom it may concern,

We come through here pretty often an it never fails we have to call for 20 min. On top of getting other bridges to call their phone an still get no answer. They need to work on answering their radio more an quicker

Posted August 16, 2016, by gfalcon (geofffalcon [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Actually it was replaced in 1995. In 1975, a parallel prestressed stringer bridge was built for westbound traffic, creating two lanes for each direction.

Posted August 15, 2016, by Vince Punaro (punarov [at] aol [dot] com)

possibly this bridge was designed by Ben L. Goepfert, P.E. for Shell Oil Company, based on information provided by another Shell engineer. Mr. Goepfert, my father-in-law, enjoyed a lengthy career with Shell, from the early 1950's to 1980's.

thanks for the posting and any additional information.

V. Punaro

Posted August 13, 2016, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Big Choctaw Bayou is in Tensas Parish but I don't find any ID for the rails in the area.

Posted August 12, 2016, by Douglas Butler

I'm trying to figure out where this lift bridge at if it's removed or still in operation here is the actual pictures from bridge engineering book from JAL Waddell

Posted August 10, 2016, by Darrell Berry (darrell [dot] berry [at] meadhunt [dot] com)

Bridge length is actually 370 feet. The 20' long concrete approach slabs at each end of the bridge are not contributing elements to the bridge length.

Posted July 14, 2016, by Brad Smith (gaberdine [at] hotmail [dot] com)
Posted July 2, 2016, by Helen Boudreaux (helenboudreaux [at] juno [dot] com)

1) Are there any pictures from the time when the pontoon bridge was built and first put into service?

2) What was being used for the locals to cross the canal prior to the pontoon bridge being built?

3) Were there any dwellings close by the bridge? Did people live close by?

3) I have heard say that traffic would cross on a barge.

I can see the bridge from my porch and am very interested in its history and the area prior my living here. I have lived here since 1976. Thank you. Helen Boudreaux

337-280-1988

Posted July 2, 2016, by Helen Boudreaux (helenboudreaux [at] juno [dot] com)

1) Are there any pictures from the time when the pontoon bridge was built and first put into service?

2) What was being used for the locals to cross the canal prior to the pontoon bridge being built?

3) Were there any dwellings close by the bridge? Did people live close by?

3) I have heard say that traffic would cross on a barge.

I can see the bridge from my porch and am very interested in its history and the area prior my living here. I have lived here since 1976. Thank you. Helen Boudreaux

337-280-1988

Posted June 25, 2016, by Gary Campos (gary [dot] campos [at] verizon [dot] net)

The bridge opened on April 12, 1977.

Posted June 23, 2016, by Kelly McClanahan

All I have ever seen of this bridge is in pictures. However, in one of my [KCS] Railroad books, this is the "ruling grade" (steepest) for that sub-division. In other words, the steepest grade in the state of LA for the Kansas City Southern, is a bridge.

Posted June 23, 2016, by Roger Deschner (rogerdeschner [at] gmail [dot] com)

There's plenty of good photos of the top side of this bridge (especially thanks to Royce and Bobette Hailey!) but few underneath. So I hope to have done that on a recent visit.

It's a fascinating, gigantic bridge, on which Baton Rouge hopes to route more traffic after the current rehabilitation is complete, due to severe congestion on the I-10 bridge. Compared to I-10, the US 190 HPL bridge is relatively under-utilized. Route LA-1, which connects the west ends of both this bridge and the I-10 bridge, has been widened to 4 lanes. Airline Highway and LA-1 now form a complete loop around the north side of metro Baton Rouge, across this bridge, bypassing the congestion on I-10.

So this latest chapter in the history of the Baton Rouge HPL bridge parallels (again) the history of the New Orleans HPL bridge, which was recently rehabilitated to relieve traffic congestion on the other, newer, Mississippi River bridges.

Posted May 23, 2016, by Tim Westcott (tim [at] westcott [dot] net)

My grandfather built this bridge as a member of the CCC in 1933-34. Attached is a picture

Posted May 19, 2016, by Luke

Wikimedia marks the image as the Seabrook railroad bridge.

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Seabrook_Railroa...

This image is from the same collection and referred to by a commenter as the St. Claude Avenue bridge, though: https://www.flickr.com/photos/teamneworleans/4327948977/in/a...

Posted May 19, 2016, by Luke

The caption on Wikipedia states that the bridge is near the Halfway House, which according to http://www.old-new-orleans.com/NO_Halfway_House.html was on City Park Avenue

Posted May 19, 2016, by Douglas Butler

This picture you posted is the Claude Avenue bridge

Posted May 19, 2016, by Douglas Butler

Hey Luke that is not the City Park Avenue bridge them pictures are the wrong pictures those pictures goes to the Tennison bridge page.

Posted May 13, 2016, by Anonymous

Bridge was constructed in the 1920's, however, it was moved to its current location in the 1960s.

Posted May 9, 2016, by gfalcon (geofffalcon [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Louisiana sure did like to use steel "truss boxes" to support their bridges in lieu of concrete pilings during the 1950's.

Posted May 9, 2016, by gfalcon (geofffalcon [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge has a weird aspect to it.... all of the eastern approaches, on-ramps, and elevated roadways were of a steel stringer construction. But on the west side of the bridge, all of those approaches and on-ramps utilized the newer prestressed concrete girder technology. Makes me wonder if the western portion of the bridge (Port Allen side) was the last part of the bridge to be built.

Posted April 9, 2016, by Pm (christiandrumr80 [at] aol [dot] com)

That is amazing history to know. Thanks for Sharing! Even though I worked out at Stennis for a period of time, I never knew about the NOVA rocket, nor the original purpose of the NOVA rocket being the driving specs for the i-10 bridge being built so tall, with a steel grate. This bridge still intrigues me to this day. I would love to see more history / pictures / schematics of it; if such a thing is around. My interest in it started (One day when I was 8/9ish) when we were in a traffic jam going from Louisiana to MS (late 80's). We were going along at a snail's pace (stop and go) because of an accident. Spending a few minutes stopped on that grate, it was the time I realized just how far up we were and why they heck put a draw bridge grate up this high - while looking down to the Pearl river below. In my mind (as a child) it wasn't like the hwy 90 Bay St. Louis, MS draw bridge and made no cognitive sense why there would be a draw bridge. No gates, no control house and no obvious way to open it made it more of a mystery and more of a reason I wanted to know more about it and bridges in general.

Posted April 7, 2016, by J B Evans (brynffyl [at] centurylink [dot] net)

Picture taken in 1965.

Posted January 3, 2016, by Anonymous (jobear1123 [at] aol [dot] com)

The bridge you are refering to crossed Choctaw Bayou in West Baton Rouge Parish, not Poydras Bayou which is also in West Baton Rouge Parish.

Posted December 1, 2015, by Jack Green (green8636 [at] bellsouth [dot] net)

Spans Big Creek

Posted November 19, 2015, by Donnie LeBoeuf (Zork70037 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I've heard stories that a train plunged into the river off the old swing span and the the train engine was never found or retrieved due to it sinking in the mud on the bottom of the Atchafalya River. Is there any truth to this story??? I've never found anything on it...

Posted November 11, 2015, by Douglas Butler

try to figure out where is the previous pedestrian drawbridge.

US 80 Bridge (Louisiana)
Posted November 6, 2015, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

New bridge under construction just to the north of current bridge will remove the double curve

Posted November 4, 2015, by Jay Schmitt (jaybird70460 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge was upgraded I believe in the early to mid 80's to meet Interstate standards for a route that never happened. Was going to be I-410 and a beltway, but ended up as the I-510 spur we have today.

Posted November 4, 2015, by Jay Schmitt (jaybird70460 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge was upgraded I believe in the early to mid 80's to meet Interstate standards for a route that never happened. Was going to be I-410 and a beltway, but ended up as the I-510 spur we have today.

Posted November 4, 2015, by Jay Schmitt (Jaybird70460 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I used to love going over this bridge as a kid. You'd get a bit of a rush over the hump.

Posted October 20, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Historic Bridge Inventory lists this as a trunnion bascule, but the builder is listed as unknown...

Posted September 23, 2015, by bill steinkampf (bsteinkampf [at] gmail [dot] com)

Correction: The late Carl Allen, Edgar's brother, led construction of this bridge.

Posted September 16, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Louisiana is right there with the state of Maine for a completely non-existant preservation track record, and a complete unwillingness to discuss preservation, all fueled by misinformation about feasibility and poor assessments of historic significance. Both states are essentially a "lost cause" when it comes to preservation and unless major change occurs, both states will eventually have no historic bridges of any kind.

Posted September 16, 2015, by Matt Lohry

How stupid. All of the reasons that they cited for demolishing this bridge are unacceptable. All of the reasons are related to functional obsolescence, not structural deficiency. This would have made a perfect bicycle & pedestrian bridge with minimal effort, but obviously the powers that be thought otherwise...

Posted September 16, 2015, by Robby Fisher (daisyfisf [at] Gmail [dot] com)

the Ok Allen bridge will be demolished on Saturday September 19 2015

Posted September 7, 2015, by Cody Guillory (Codyguillory19 [at] gmail [dot] com)

To whom it may concern, y'all either need new radios or post a phone number so we can call to get a opening. We call on the radio for 15 min. With no answer.

Thanks in advance

Posted July 24, 2015, by clay manly (cmanly [at] bellsouth [dot] net)

New photo

Posted May 24, 2015, by Lee A. Gautreaux (railgoat [at] bellsouth [dot] net)

For further clarification, the westernmost through span which had previously served as the swing span prior to the installation of the center vertical lift span no longer functions as a draw span. The rails have been permanently welded together and the swing mechanism has been permanently disabled. All marine traffic that cannot travel under the bridge must use the center lift span.

Posted May 22, 2015, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)
Posted May 14, 2015, by Eric Berger (eric [dot] berger [at] chron [dot] com)

So the answer to this is pretty interesting and I only stumbled across it after speaking with Humboldt Mandell, who worked on the original Mars planning group at NASA in the early 1960s. When this bridge was being built they needed to transport rockets from Stennis to Michoud, and the rocket they envisioned using for Mars was called the "Nova" rocket. This was envisioned to be a good deal wider than the Saturn V and thus the high clearance needed for this particular bridge.

Posted May 13, 2015, by Ryan (notmyemail [at] email [dot] com)

I can't believe someone actually thought those were real pistols!

Posted May 10, 2015, by Jennifer Brindle (jbrindle57 [at] me [dot] com)

My grandfather, Edgar L Allen Sr, was in charge of the crew who built this bridge. The HL Allen and Sons company had the contract. He was HL Allen's oldest son.

Posted April 27, 2015, by Luke
Posted April 23, 2015, by Lesa Brose (lesabrose [at] yahoo [dot] com )

Does anyone know who the builder of this bridge was? I believe my grandfather worked on this bridge during the 1940's. The construction company owners last name may have been Walker? Thanks.

Posted April 14, 2015, by Cliff Darby (clif30 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Yeah I can't remove the incorrect photos (3 and 4) ... I'll try and contact a webmaster to remove them.

Posted April 4, 2015, by Robby fisher (daisyfisf [at] gmail [dot] com)

Here is a picture of the old bridge when it first opened you will notice a difference from picture 3 and 4

Posted April 3, 2015, by Buddy (robmsherf [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Is there a link for the anemometer(wind gauge) on the trestle, between MM 176 and 177.Sure could use that real time info for fishing the bridge. Thanks Buddy

Posted March 28, 2015, by Janna

Bridge is closed currently. (3-28-2015)

Posted March 26, 2015, by Robby Fisher (daisyfisf [at] Gmail [dot] com)

The new bridge is not called Fulton street bridge it is called the purple heart memorial bridge

Posted March 24, 2015, by Robby fisher (daisyfisf [at] gmail [dot] com)

I don't have a picture of the old bridge

Posted March 24, 2015, by Robby fisher (daisyfisf [at] gmail [dot] com)

I don't have a picture of the old bridge

Posted March 24, 2015, by Robby fisher (daisyfisf [at] gmail [dot] com)

Neither picture 3 or 4 depicts the old Fulton street bridge it was a vertical lift bridge but it had 3 spans the Alexandria span the main span and the pineville span and two towers

Posted March 24, 2015, by Robby fisher (daisyfisf [at] gmail [dot] com)

You have the status wrong the Murray street bridge was demolished and replaced by the gillis long Jackson street bridge

Posted March 24, 2015, by Robby fisher (daisyfisf [at] gmail [dot] com)

The OK Allen bridge officially closed on Tuesday march 17,2015 and is currently being demolished. Traffic is now moving on the north bound two lane new bridge

Posted March 18, 2015, by brian andras (brianandras [at] msn [dot] com)

I worked for the southern Pacific,union Pacific and the present owner b.n.s.f.railway.U.P.only aquired this portion of the railroad for a short period and under government regulation spun it off to the bnsf.in the early 19th century it was a swing bridge with the opening being on the Berwick side of the river. It was later modernized to a lift bridge with the opening more to the middle of the river.I've operated bridges for 3 railroads since 1980. Enjoyed your pictures

Posted February 24, 2015, by Brad Smith (gaberdine [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Not sure of the economics of it, but a parallel span a little wider than this one could be the answer. Build the new span. Reroute both directions of traffic onto it.

Close the existing span and remove much of the approaches, refurbish the bridge. Build new less steep approaches. Route unidirectional traffic on the old bridge and the opposite on the new bridge. .

This would minimize the environmental issues related to removing the existing bridge, have the historic span remain, and maybe save some money.

Melville Ferry (Louisiana)
Posted February 14, 2015, by David (thedietrich [at] gmail [dot] com)

Now that the ferry is closed, has anyone crossed on the Union Pacific Railroad bridge?

Posted February 11, 2015, by Zachary S

Definitely looks like it to me. I can make out pins and eyebars in the street view.

Posted February 10, 2015, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

Am I seeing things? This sure looks like a pin-connected Warren railroad truss.

Posted February 5, 2015, by Glenn Gaudet (gandegaudet [at] gmail [dot] com)

I believe the set of four photos at the top of the page are of the Highway 90 bridge over Pearl River. Rigolets Bridge has the three steel sections followed by a long causeway before you reach land. The third section of the Pearl River bridge immediately ends on the land. Attached photo is a Google Earth Street View of the Highway 90 bridge over the Pearl River (La/Miss State Line).

Posted January 29, 2015, by Bryce Denny (bryce [at] brycedenny [dot] com)

While the bridge looks fairly new, a railroad employee confirmed that it is at least 35 years old.

Posted December 22, 2014, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Now THAT is a great bridge photo!

Posted December 22, 2014, by Kristen Hanson (kriseh86 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Absolutely fell in love with this bridge. Any history that can be told please share :)

Posted December 22, 2014, by Kristen Hanson (kriseh86 [at] gmail [dot] com)

December 21, 2014 Sunset between.

Posted December 18, 2014, by Douglas Butler

This is the evidence a photo of a Tensas River Railroad Bridge.

Luling Bridge (Louisiana)
Posted December 13, 2014, by Anonymous

The death of my step father... Who was one of the civil engineers was never mentioned either... Even tho he died while he was measuring last piece on the barge....

Posted November 7, 2014, by Benjamin (indyberryfarms [at] gmail [dot] com)

I believe this bridge is part of the Canadian National railroad system (former IC/ICG) and not Canadian Pacific.

Posted November 6, 2014, by Benjamin (indyberryfarms [at] gmail [dot] com)

this bridge is currently being repainted a grey color....the orange paint is being removed. I always understood that the orange paint was chosen because of the bauxite dust from the former Kaiser aluminum plant near the bridge coating the structure and "painting" it orange no matter what the actual color was. But....that could have just been my grandfather (who worked at the old Ethyl chemical plant) pulling my leg.

Posted October 21, 2014, by Chris Goodwin (txzebrfan [at] mail [dot] com)

I have some pictures of the Rigolets Bridge on my trip back home from Nov 2004. I spent a lot of time on that island. My grandfather was the Baptist preacher on the island at Fort Pike Baptist Chapel.

Both pictures were taken at Fort Pike standing watching the old bridge open and close.

Posted October 16, 2014, by Mike (michaelcaswell [at] icloud [dot] com)

Regarding the drawbridge mystery, I've often wondered about this myself. Even now, though the grating has been removed, you can still see what appears to be "hinges" in the road deck at the top of the bridge.

Additionally (and this would answer your question about the lack of a control room), once when we went boating on the Pearl River, I observed a door at the base of the eastern main vertical structure of the middle span.

I recently did a little more digging, and found an article that mentioned that a drawbridge was built here because of the need to transport Apollo rockets for testing at the facility a bit upriver from the chosen I-10 route.

http://history.nasa.gov/SP-4310/ch5.htm

This is still a bit of a mystery, as all the photos I've seen of Apollo stages being transported by water have them laying down on the barge (not standing upright), and with a vertical clearance of about 72ft., I would think that the 33ft. diameter first stage of the Saturn V would have no trouble passing underneath without opening.

The only thing I can think of is perhaps when the bridge was built, they didn't know whether or not the rocket stages would be transported horizontally or vertically, so they spec'd a drawbridge just in case.

Also, my assumption is that if the bridge needed to be opened, a crew member from the tugboat could enter structure at water level from the previously mentioned door, and operate the bridge from there. This makes sense, as there would likely be very little need for the bridge to ever open, so rather than have the control room up at road deck level, they instead made it accessible to the boat crew.