Rating:
1 vote

Highlands Latin School Bridge

Photos 

Photo taken by James McCray in January 2016

Enlarge

BH Photo #345693

Map 

Street View 

Description 

This bridge has been modified. The bridge has an ancient stone arch structure underneath with a modern slab on top to handle modern traffic.

Facts 

Overview
Bridge over Middle Fork Beargrass Creek on an entrance road to Highlands Latin School
Location
Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky
Status
Open to traffic
History
Built 1869; Widened ?
Design
Stone arch substructure with modern widened road on top
Approximate latitude, longitude
+38.24458, -85.55140   (decimal degrees)
38°14'40" N, 85°33'05" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
16/626762/4233944 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Jeffersontown
Inventory number
BH 70564 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Categories 

19th Century (6,229)
Arch (11,274)
Built 1869 (59)
Built during 1860s (389)
Deck arch (10,511)
Have street view (22,590)
Jefferson County, Kentucky (121)
Kentucky (1,137)
Louisville, Kentucky (68)
Open (36,905)
Owned privately (1,310)
Stone arch (2,677)

Update Log 

  • January 15, 2016: New Street View added by James McCray

Sources 

  • James McCray - jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com

Comments 

Highlands Latin School Bridge
Posted March 7, 2017, by Anonymous

Oh my!

Highlands Latin School Bridge
Posted March 6, 2017, by Anonymous

RATS LIVE NOT ON EVIL STAR

Highlands Latin School Bridge
Posted March 6, 2017, by Anonymous

ΪʲôѰ

Highlands Latin School Bridge
Posted March 6, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

我不明白为什么每个人都用另一种语言说话。 我非常爱桥梁。

Highlands Latin School Bridge
Posted March 5, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

It's a term I have used for many years...

https://www.google.com/#q=extant+definition&*

*I see it was also the title of a short-lived CBS show starring Halle Berry!

Highlands Latin School Bridge
Posted March 5, 2017, by Dana & Kay

Cant decide what to put on my bridge visiting hard hat, Drochaid Sealgair or Pontem Ventator!

Highlands Latin School Bridge
Posted March 5, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Extant is a commonly misused word in general. Many people think that it means gone, when it actually means still in existence.

Gee, and here I thought that the Highlands Latin School was where they mixed Gaelic and Latin...gabh mo leisgeul...

Slow Sunday on Bridgehunter...

Highlands Latin School Bridge
Posted March 5, 2017, by Anonymous

Tu Auten Ponten Venator!

Highlands Latin School Bridge
Posted March 5, 2017, by Anonymous

(Scottish) Highland Latin? I'm not sure which language to groan in.

At least it's more or less extant (Latin exstant), meaning existent or surviving, an old word from the Latin commonly used incorrectly on BH.

Highlands Latin School Bridge
Posted March 5, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Tapadh leibh :-)

Highlands Latin School Bridge
Posted March 5, 2017, by Anonymous

liosta bucaid

Highlands Latin School Bridge
Posted March 5, 2017, by Anonymous

Glort

Highlands Latin School Bridge
Posted March 5, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Well, I don't know how to say bucket list in Gaelic but Bridgehunting in the Highlands is on my bucket list. Scotland has some incredible stone arch bridges. Plus I wouldn't mind seeing the ancestral homeland of our family...

Highlands Latin School Bridge
Posted March 5, 2017, by Mike Daffron (daffronmike [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Klaatu barada nikto

Highlands Latin School Bridge
Posted March 5, 2017, by Anonymous

drochaid sealgair s a 'Ghidhealtachd

Highlands Latin School Bridge
Posted March 5, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Tha gu math, tapadh leibh. Ciamar a tha sibh fhein?

Highlands Latin School Bridge
Posted March 5, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

finis

Highlands Latin School Bridge
Posted March 5, 2017, by Mike Daffron (daffronmike [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Ixnay on the atinlay

Highlands Latin School Bridge
Posted March 5, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Linguam Latinam in quibusdam locis adhuc

Highlands Latin School Bridge
Posted March 4, 2017, by Walter Laughlin (l)

Magnum narras, nihil usquam non est verum. fornicem in lapide constructa, ut habetur Luc prodidere MDCCCLXIX aperto loco ubi Lorem filiorum. Adhuc in scholis docuerint classica latina forma structurae linguae Latinae per quattuor saltem annos. Tamen, invenitur interesting.

Highlands Latin School Bridge
Posted January 17, 2016, by james mccray (jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com)

You are probably correct. And i will change the info about the bridge to reflect the linked info. However, I like the Roman theory about this bridge better, though it may not be realistic. Just like the difference between the true St. Nick and Santa Claus, the version of the man that is fat, dresses in a creepy red suit, asks children to sit on his lap and asks if they have been good or bad, then gives kids gifts, then tells them he goes for rides in a sleigh guided by magical flying reindeer in which is led by an even more magical reindeer with a red nose is just a tad more interesting then the facts that St. Nick was not a creepy guy that lives with elves but was just a kindly old Catholic man who helped the poor. Oh well, I will continue to believe in my heart that this is an old Roman bridge.

Highlands Latin School Bridge
Posted January 15, 2016, by Luke

It's more likely the bridge was built in 1869 when the Louisville Baptist Children's Home/Spring Meadow Children's Home (Now occupied by the for-profit school.) was built.

https://books.google.com/books?id=W7EeBgAAQBAJ&pg=PA681&dq=s...

Highlands Latin School Bridge
Posted January 15, 2016, by James McCray (jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Need help here: Found this bridge and noticed it is a slab bridge with a much older stone arch structure underneath it. Obviously, the slab part of the bridge was put there to handle modern traffic.

Anyway, I went to a local gas station nearby to get fuel and ended up talking with a guy there. I told him what I was doing and showed him some pics of the bridge. He explained to me that the bridge was built by the Romans. I was skeptical, but then he started to explain his reasoning. The bridge is located on the grounds of Highlands Latin School, which is a Christian private school that offers courses in Latin language and translation. He explained that this is not a "Catholic" school, but a normal Christian private school that just happens to offer Latin as its prime curriculum subject. He explained that this is quite unusual for a private school that is not Catholic. He went on to explain that the Romans landed in North America centuries before Columbus and that they briefly established some small colonies. He said that he knew that because he watched several documentaries, did some internet research, and heard about it on the radio talk show "Coast to Coast." Then he told me that the bridge is a Roman landmark that happened to survive to this day. He said that the Romans left an enduring legacy because why would a random school "just happen" to offer Latin as its main course if it is not Catholic? Also, he said that, the bridge just happens to be on the campus of a "Latin" teaching institution, which, the Romans greatly influenced the spread of Latin. He summarized his theory by saying all these things would prove that this bridge is of Roman origin. He also made this observation, that an ancient stone arch bridge is located at a non-Catholic "Latin" school and that there are two Olive Garden eateries. He then also pointed to a post card rack in the gas station where he showed me a birthday card with a pic of a bust of Caesar on it. He finished by saying all these things point to a clear Roman legacy and that the bridge is a Roman bridge.

Anyway, if this is true, then this could possibly be one of the oldest bridges in the United States. Also, I tried to find any other info about this bridge, but could not find any. The officials at the Latin School did not know anything about the bridge and there is no other evidence that would distract from allowing this bridge to be of Roman origin. So if anyone wants to chime in please do! Until then, I think I'm quite happy with at least convincing myself that this is a Roman bridge.