Recent Kentucky Comments

Post a comment Contact webmaster

Posted September 8, 2018, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

Yes! The wire to start the cables had been delivered as the (Un)Civil War began. The towers outlived this bridge and the bases of them are still intact. They were lowered when the railway was double tracked.

Posted September 8, 2018, by Anonymous

High Bridge was first planned as a suspension bridge by Mr. John Roebling who later designed the famous Brooklyn Bridge in New York city. The huge stone towers were built in 1851 to hold cables to support the bridge. Work on this bridge was abandoned during the Civil War. Construction of the cantilever design bridge was resumed by the Cincinnati Southern Railway and the bridge was opened in 1877. It is the first cantilever bridge built on the American continent. The large twin towers were torn down in 1929. Below is a photo of Mr. John Roebling.

Posted July 31, 2018, by Chad Montag (chad [dot] montag [at] gmail [dot] com)

As of at least December 2017, this bridge has a fence the entire length and appears open to foot traffic. See attached file.

Posted July 19, 2018, by Anonymous

bridge closed, passable by pedestrians

Posted July 18, 2018, by J.P. (wildcatjon2000 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I'm really not sure how I feel about the color, guess its better than black.

Posted July 17, 2018, by Luke

Nonexistent for 80 years, since OSHA was formed in 1971.

Posted July 17, 2018, by Carol Edgar (caedgar1937 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Four men lost their lives during the construction of the Central Bridge. One, a family member was painting the bridge when he fell to his death below. Where was KYOSHA then?

Posted July 17, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)
Posted July 5, 2018, by Jeff Phelps (cjphelps [at] hughes [dot] net)

Well color me wrong. I saw the other photos of the bridge that I didn't see at first. It is not the bridge over the East Fork of the Little Sandy although it is a dead ringer for it down the road on the opposite side and the hill to the left. I've seen it identified as the East Fork bridge before. I'm amazed they could look so similar.

Posted July 5, 2018, by Jeff Phelps (cjphelps [at] hughes [dot] net)

That is not the bridge described as the Little Sandy Bridge on Rt. 7. It is the East Fork Bridge on Rt. 1. I lived right beside that bridge for years. I have this same photo and it definitely is NOT the bridge you say it is. I know that bridge like the back of my hand. Across the bridge on the right is a road. It is barely visible in the photo but it's there. That was our driveway. BTW the driveway followed the old Eastern Kentucky Railway bed. Our house was built when the train still ran there. It was right beside the railroad tracks.

This is where that bridge was located:

38.501455, -82.829196

It was 50 years ago that I lived there as an adolescent. I am including a recent photo of the old house taken from the railroad bed which ran on past the front of the house.

Posted June 24, 2018, by Walter Laughlin (laughlin [dot] robert [at] gmail [dot] com)

Cynthiana was not the oldest covered bridge in Kentucky at any point of its existence.

The 1807 bridge was an open span which had deteriorated and was replaced in the 18teens or 1820s. There was at least on additional open bridge at Cynthiana until construction of this bridge in 1837.

The construction of the Cynthiana covered bridge is attributed to Greenup Remington and this is reasonably well documented and considered fact. The plans were, purportedly, drawn by Lewis Wernwag. Wernwag was actively building covered bridges in Kentucky at the time of its construction which lends credence to this though no reliable documentation of a connection of the plans to Wernwag has been discovered.

The bridge was "recognized" as the "Oldest Covered Bridge In Kentucky" on the occasion of its one hundredth anniversary, though, at the time, at least two older covered bridges remained standing in the Commonwealth.

An interesting aside: There was a covered bridge at Cynthiana prior to the construction of this bridge. The court records were discovered some years ago by George Slade, a local historian, now deceased. It carried Pleasant Street some three blocks from the site of this bridge. It was built about 1826 and was destroyed in a flood after just a few years of service. There was no bridge at the Pleasant Street site until about 1904 when the iron truss, itself replaced about 1942, was constructed.

Posted June 23, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

https://bridgehunter.com/ky/greenup/hopewell/

This bridge looks very similar to the 1868 Hopewell Bridge (NR listed) in neighboring Greenup County.

Posted June 23, 2018, by Jim O (owensrvclub [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Can motor homes cross this bridge that are under 11’H? We’re a c class unit towing a car.

Posted June 22, 2018, by Luke

Confirmed via the railroad historical society.

Posted June 22, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Looking at previous links to pictures, it appears that this possibly is an old railroad bridge. The previous flikr shot from below the Pratt span shows a stringer configuration typical of railroad bridges.

Posted June 22, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

From https://archives.cohs.org/

"BRIDGE #5469L, OVER LITTLE FORK OF THE LITTLE SANDY RIVER; LEXINGTON SUBDIVISION, NEAR HITCHINS KY.; 153'10 1/2 SINGLE SPAN, THRU TRUSS, WITH SINGLE TRACK BUILT 1906. (PHOTO 1924)"

This seems to give a much more reasonable build date of 1906. I would assume all three identical bridges date to this same year.

Posted June 21, 2018, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Yes I agree they don't look like 1870s bridges, to heavy-duty looking... one more reason why its stupid to demolish them they probably are designed to handle a lot of weight. Minor repairs could go a long way to return them to a high weight limit.

Posted June 21, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I also don’t think that they are 1870s vintage. I suspect they date to the first decade of the 20th century.

Posted June 21, 2018, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This bridge maybe is from the same vintage at this one:

http://bridgehunter.com/ky/carter/bh71016/

Being as these are in the same county as those three bridges being demolished, I worry that these two bridges are also at risk. These two are highly significant bridges and should be preserved.

Posted June 21, 2018, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

To demolish these three bridges is absolutely stupid. I guarantee these bridges are in better condition than is suggested, particularly in regards to the metal trusses. And yes they actually ARE trying to destroy history, because they are NOT replacing the bridges and I guarantee these bridges are safe to simply close to traffic and leave standing. I laughed when I saw one of these bridges listed as "Imminent Failure" condition. Yeah right. There is absolutely no excuse to demolish these beautiful historic bridges. The claims of people moving the blocks is only an indication that the public WANTS these bridges available for use and thus they should be repaired and reopened to traffic. And if they wanted to avoid that problem then simply put permanent bollards and barriers in rather than removable barriers.

Posted June 21, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This quite possibly is an early 1880s railroad pony truss, converted to road use

Posted June 21, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)
Posted June 21, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)
Posted June 21, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)
Posted June 13, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Yep, looked like concrete until I got close and zoomed. They actually look like grey steel I-beams. "Concrete capped steel pilings".

Posted June 13, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Whoops, didn’t even see that. The google street view must be old, as I thought the piles looked like concrete.

Posted June 13, 2018, by Matt Lohry

The vertical members are steel; they’re driven into the ground much the same as sheet piling; they’re simply referred to as driven piles. After they’re all driven, a concrete cap is installed on top for system unification and surface for attachments.

Posted June 13, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I’ve always heard it called concrete pile piers, so I would assume that would be the correct name, although I’m not absolutely sure.

Posted June 13, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Is their a name for this style of Pier? thanks

Posted June 8, 2018, by J.P. (wildcatjon2000 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Was able to get to the South side of the bridge and get some photos of the lift span and plaque. Couldn't get on the bridge so it's a cropped photo of the plaque.

Posted May 30, 2018, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

You found it. Outstanding.

Posted May 29, 2018, by Michael Page (jellicle2210 [at] windstream [dot] net)

This image is dated 1886, only 3 years earlier than the 1889 date listed for the bridge. But, I think it pretty solidly establishes that a 3 span Bowstring bridge (without the blocky top braces) on stone piers was there prior to 1889. Wilkerson Island and the boatlanding (complete with packet steamer at the landing) are plainly visible in the background.

https://westernkentuckyuniversity.pastperfectonline.com/phot...

Posted May 29, 2018, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

that is awesome info. I've included it in our letter to the county with a credit to your historic finds. I know that the county clerk has great interest and this map fits in. Keep it up. and THANK YOU.

Posted May 28, 2018, by Michael Page (jellicle2210 [at] windstream [dot] net)

I just stumbled up on something a bit more interesting. I hope I'm not wearing out my welcome. I just love that old bridge. :)

This is a map showing some kind of permanent river crossing (bridge?) in that exact location. The map was draw up by D.G. Beers & Co. In 1877. :)

https://www.loc.gov/resource/g3953w.la000242/?r=0.365,0.871,...

Posted May 28, 2018, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

A creative engineer in the late 1880s that ordered sale parts to create a bridge? Thanks so much because i coukdnt find maos to support the iron. I think we have an incredible hybrid bridge here. I have talked to David Simmons and seen patents, but your research goes along with what Nels is saying too.

Posted May 28, 2018, by Michael Page (Jellicle2210 [at] windstream [dot] net)

Please feel free. Most of the information came from the WKU archives and the KY Digital Library. Just let me know if you need links to the articles.

Posted May 27, 2018, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Great research. We are submitting a proposal to repair and reopen. May i use some of what you have found?

Gratz Bridge (Kentucky)
Posted May 23, 2018, by Brian Lockett (catbus420 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I saw a "murder show" on ID-channel that involved the Gratz Bridge. It was in a series about trying miscarriages of justice.

It was about a lady in Shelbyville who spent a few years in jail after being convicted of killing her boyfriend, which was terribly stupid of the courts. She was little, they said under 100-lbs and only had one leg due to an old car accident. I don't know how a jury could have possibly thought that the little lady would be able to kill the guy, let alone tying him to concrete blocks and throwing him off of the Gratz bridge. Luckily, a guy in Louisville wound up confessing out of the blue and she was freed.

The show had the bridge in a few scenes but they were the wrong bridge. It wasn't some generic stock footage of a bridge. It may very well have been the "Gratz bridge" but the murder happened around 1998, so he would have gotten tossed off of the old cool bridge.

Posted May 22, 2018, by Michael Page (jellicle2210 [at] windstream [dot] net)

This is turning out to be a lot of fun. I've still not found anything referencing a bridge prior to the 1889 date on the plaque, but I have found out a lot of "big picture" info that would support a bridge being built there out of necessity at the end of the war. Bowling Green was actually a major transportation "hub" at the time, with the Railroad (north-south) crossing paths with the Barren-Green river system (east-west). The retreating Confederates destroyed the railroad bridge, and those retreating from the town of Woodbury dumped boulders and scrap iron into the lock chamber at the dam. The lock and dam at Woodbury locked up the confluence of both the Green and Barren rivers, and totally stopped all steamboat and packet travel above that point. The Union Army had the railroad bridge repaired before the end of the war, but the damage to the locks was not, and the system was allowed to deteriorate for the rest of the war. When the war ended, no action was taken on the river until 1868, when the government leased navigation to a private company, and it was around 1870/71 before they got the river open again. Building a bridge would have been a perfect solution to getting producers of goods north of the river access to the railroad. In fact, the path of the original Richardsville Road made a short loop around to where the small scale "portage railroad" ended near the docks. It's very possible the bridge was built in a "get 'er done" fashion in the late 1860's, with strengthening and improvements done at the later dates.

Posted May 16, 2018, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

We were thinking late 1860s. Thanks for the research.

Posted May 15, 2018, by Michael Page (jellicle2210 [at] windstream [dot] net)

If it's of any help...Bowling Green was the Confederate capital of Kentucky early in the civil war, and several good maps were drawn up of the area for military use. As of 1863/64, there was not a bridge there, nor was there even a road in that location. It would have to had been late 1860's at the very earliest.

Posted May 11, 2018, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The team visits this bridge for Warren County. We will be providing an estimate for the engineers working drawings and repairs to the county as as soon as possible.

Cant wait to delve more into the history of incredible trabsformation of this bridge.

Posted May 9, 2018, by Melissa Jurgensen

I have since spoken with the owner. The bridge was removed on Friday, April 27, 2018. After the severe damage it received in the flooding at the end of July 2017 he considered the bridge a safety hazard. He spent his own money trying to save the bridge but in the end, he felt that removal was the best thing to do. He did salvage some of the bridge but does not believe the timbers date back to 1864.

Posted May 6, 2018, by Melissa Jurgensen (mjurgensen [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The bridge has been replaced at an unknown date after I last phptpgraphed it in August 2017

Posted May 5, 2018, by Damon McGaha

This bridge was built in February/March 1907 and finished just before midnight on 31-March-1907.

It was built by the Vincennes Bridge Company

Some history can be found here:

http://www.columbiamagazine.com/index.php?sid=72266

It was condemned and closed to traffic (and should have been several years before) on 20-August-2014.

Near that time, large rectangular concrete barriers were placed at each end to prevent vehicle access.

On 17-April-2015, it was lifted from its piers and set in the river, then drug from the river and hauled to where it now sits as a pedestrian bridge at the adjacent Tebb's Bend Battleground property.

I believe it's present location is only temporary, as it does not span anything; and, when money allows, I believe it will be relocated to span one of the several creek crossings within the battleground park.

Posted May 4, 2018, by Damon McGaha

Thank you for the info.

I just uploaded five new photos that show the side view of the completed bridge.

I could not do better that day, as there was a lot of traffic due to a festival on the same road and no way to get out of the road to get a better angle.

As to the 1907 bridge being replaced, my wife and I walked out on the old bridge in September 2014 and the whole thing shook with every step; no way would I have ventured onto it with a vehicle.

That being said, in the 1980s and 90s, I crossed it frequently with a loaded gooseneck cattle trailer; even then, had I have gotten out and took a closer look, I probably would have vetoed such a foolish move and went the long way around.

Posted May 4, 2018, by Royce and Bobette Haley (roycehaley111 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

http://historicbridges.org/info/intro/index.htm

This will explain the differences. It is difficult to see clearly but the photo, I believe, shows this to be a Pratt. Also, I can not be sure but I do not believe the bridge in the Sat. view is the same the bridge in the photo

Royce

Posted May 4, 2018, by Damon McGaha

I am somewhat confused by this bridge being described as a Warren Through Truss, and it may very well be; however, this bridge has verticals.

My understanding about the various bridge designs is that a Warren has no vertical members.

Were this bridge not already described as a Warren, I would label it as a Pratt Through Truss, as it has all the design attributes of a Pratt.

Could someone please enlighten me on this; and, if it is indeed a Warren, please point out what makes it a Warren.

Thank you.

Posted May 2, 2018, by rick shelton (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I can't believe this thing survived. The displaced roadbed shows the kind of force it was dealing with.

Posted May 2, 2018, by rick shelton (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Rumors of this bridges' demise were greatly exaggerated. The bridge has been retained and is open again.

Posted April 19, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Note that this collapse is old news. There is currently a UCEB in place and all is open.

Posted April 19, 2018, by James McCray (jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This is pretty sad that this bridge has been destroyed as it was the only bedstead in the direct Louisville, KY area. If anyone has any info on its history, please chime in.

Posted April 11, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

James... the issue is more complex than that. If the bridge can be proven to be one of the oldest bridges in Kentucky than this raises its state level of significance... giving it a better chance of funding. If the bridge can be proven to be one of the oldest king bowstrings in the country, this raises its national significance... giving it a better chance of funding. Here are the facts:

1. Unusual shoes and bottom chord details at the end unlike those ever seen before

2. Bottom chord eyebar/pin/splice matches ca 1871 details of Springfield Bridge in Arkansas. Does not use the knife design used in later bowstrings.

3. Archaic King Bridge Company plaque design on bowstring top chord, older than the usual oval shape used on bowstrings.

4. 1889 King plaque on overhead bracing. Purpose/origin unknown. Research needed.

5. On the overhead bracing (not original to the bowstring), Carnegie brand with an inset "H" at the last "e" is a logo used starting in the 1920s. Thus suggesting the existing bracing seen was installed in the 1920s. Research needed.

I cannot claim to know the exact history, but with research it would be nice to prove a theory that the bowstring truss was fabricated by King Bridge in the late 1860s to early 1870s, with "something" happening in 1889 and "something" happening in the 1920s.

Posted April 11, 2018, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

It does matter for these old bridges to figure out the story and not believe engineers who have their own fiscal agendas now or historians who dont quite know and do your own homework. It's an old bridge, modified early, for stength and height, which allowed it to stay open. Hopefully we can get back to open so a few folks can actually drive across. That's what is important. 20 years is a big deal and we have done our research to further the discussion.

Posted April 10, 2018, by James McCray (jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I am going to throw my 2 cents in here....

Some of you think its an 1889 bridge and some of you think its an 1860's bridge.

I say its an old bridge.

There.

Issue settled.

The bridge will live on.

Posted April 9, 2018, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Oops. Please delete dupes....we all make mistakes.

Lol

Posted April 9, 2018, by Anonymous

Not an 1889 bowstring. How do we fact check NRHP..

Details and research. The shoes are a fix according to David Simmons but this is an early King bowstring because of the patents and details and placque.

We're researching. Floating possibilities and discussuon, talking. The community is larger than you can imagine, a lot of it not on here because of the bashing when there is much fun to be had.

Weve got the contract to see if BACH and gang can get it open by repairing the problemd.

Glad I questioned and looked and noted from site visits but i dont post much here anymore.

Posted April 9, 2018, by Anonymous

Not an 1889 bowstring. How do we fact check NRHP..

Details and research. The shoes are a fix according to David Simmons but this is an early King bowstring because of the patents and details and placque.

Were researching. Floating possibilities and discussuon, research. The community is larger than you can imagine, a lot of it not on here because of the bashing.

Weve got the contract t

Posted April 9, 2018, by Anonymous

Not an 1889 bowstring. How do we fact check NRHP..

Details and research. The shoes are a fix according to David Simmons but this is an early King bowstring because of the patents and details and placque.

Were researching. Floating possibilities and discussuon, research. The community is larger than you can imagine, a lot of it not on here because of the bashing.

Weve got the contract t

Posted April 9, 2018, by Anonymous

Not an 1889 bowstring. How do we fact check NRHP..

Details and research. The shoes are a fix according to David Simmons but this is an early King bowstring because of the patents and details and placque.

Were researching. Floating possibilities and discussuon, research. The community is larger than you can imagine, a lot of it not on here because of the bashing.

Weve got the contract t

Posted March 19, 2018, by Ross Brown (bluehavanaross [at] gmail [dot] com)

The original bridge consisted of three truss spans. The middle span was destroyed during a 1997 flood and was replaced by a temporary Bailey span. The new bridge opened in 2005.

Here is a link to a page about the new bridge. http://migration.kentucky.gov/Newsroom/kytc.d6/McKinneysburg...

Posted March 17, 2018, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This detail, late 1860s for the bowstring. Slotted and square. Not round, threaded with a nut.

Posted March 14, 2018, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)
Posted March 9, 2018, by Michael Page (mjpageky [at] windstream [dot] net)

The bridge is in no danger, but may have to be closed to vehicle traffic. It's currently closed "pending further inspection".

http://www.bgdailynews.com/news/historic-richardsville-bridg...

Posted March 7, 2018, by William McClenahan (wmcclena [at] rhsmith [dot] umd [dot] edu)

Friend is correct. Relic bridge here used to be main US 60 bridge. South of it are remnants of bridge that carried inter-urban railway between Louisville and Shelbyville. This functioned to 1930s. Remember could see old inter-urban Rwy bridge in 1950s. Now, very little left

Check out a website called Errie-Indiana (and Louisville) that has more pictures

Posted February 18, 2018, by DK (Kers242 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Bride is located in dudded impact area (old unexploded bombs, ammo, etc).

Twin Bridges (Kentucky)
Posted February 1, 2018, by lyon_wonder (lyon_wonder [at] yahoo [dot] com)

There are 3 proposed alignment options for the new I-69 bridge from Henderson to Evansville: West Alternative 1, Western Alternative 2 and Central Alternative 1. Central Alternative 1, which places the I-69 bridge east and away from the US 41 bridges is the preferred location and is likely to be the chosen alignment.

https://www.courierpress.com/story/news/2018/01/31/details-e...

Posted January 31, 2018, by M Cox (trock859[at]yahoo[dot]com)

The short side is not acessable, due to the fact that it has no trespassing signs posted on it. If you want to see this, you have to walk it the long way. Be prepared for a 1 mile walk for this one.

Posted January 30, 2018, by M Cox (trock859[at]yahoo[dot]com)

Sadly, this bridge was demolished last year. 😔😣

Posted January 16, 2018, by Joyce MacKay (jomac44 [at] sbcglobal [dot] net)

I have an ancestor who in 1799 was supposedly buried on an island at the mouth of 12 Mile Creek and the Ohio River. I have heard that the island is no longer there, having been swept away during a flood. Do you have any information about this island and was there a cemetery located there? Thanks for any information you may have.

Posted January 1, 2018, by Melissa Jurgensen

The restoration of the Beech Fork Covered Bridge was completed on December 25, 2017 by Arnold M. Graton & Associates. 80%+ of the original bridge was able to be reused. Interior view.

Posted January 1, 2018, by Melissa Jurgensen

The restoration of the Beech Fork Covered Bridge was completed on December 25, 2017 by Arnold M. Graton & Associates. 80%+ of the original bridge was able to be reused. The abutments were covered with gunite at some point in time. In the restoration much of the stone was rotated so the gunite-covered face is hidden, making the bridge more picturesque. (Chipping off the gunite would have damaged the stone too much.) The only place the stones weren't rotated is directly under the bridge.

Posted January 1, 2018, by Melissa Jurgensen

The restoration of the Beech Fork Covered Bridge was completed on December 25, 2017 by Arnold M. Graton & Associates. 80%+ of the original bridge was able to be reused. Another beautiful job!

Posted December 30, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Interesting tunnel. Thanks for the photo.

Posted December 30, 2017, by Anonymous

i have drove cars and trucks and drove a tractor thought it without headlights on the tractor though it when it was open

Posted December 30, 2017, by jason (jbcky79 [at] gmail [dot] com)

i grew up close to the tunnel in the winter time when the trees lost there leaves you can see the old railroad bed from my parents home we played in the tunnel a lot as kids

Posted December 22, 2017, by Tandy Chenault (kyscooter [at] yahoo [dot] com)

adding pictures

Posted December 22, 2017, by Tandy Chenault (kyscooter [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Adding pictures

Posted December 14, 2017, by James McCray (jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I really hope that this bridge was really built by Vikings as its name implies. It certainly looks old enough that it could be true.

Posted December 4, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

There are some conflicting statements in the forum on this bridge, and the information shown is misleading. Firstly, I field visited this bridge and ALL connections are bolted, and ALL members are rolled steel beams. In addition, a 1989 photo provides clear photographic evidence (with additional confirmation in the caption) that the bridge seen today is not historic, and is instead an all-new truss sitting on (in part) the earlier piers. The 1946 bridge had built-up beams with lattice and v-lacing, and the 1963 bridge had built-up beams with holes. http://www.kyphotoarchive.com/2017/03/06/i-75-clays-ferry-br...

A 1944 construction photo is here: http://www.kyphotoarchive.com/2014/07/02/clays-ferry-bridge-...

Posted November 25, 2017, by M Cox (trock859[at]yahoo[dot]com)

To those who mourn this bridge, it is uncommon to have those guardrails without a truss bridge. But, there is a twin of it in Carter County. It is in Olive Hill, Kentucky. It is located on Cross Street. It has been maintained better, much better. I beleve it is a steel stringer from around the same time.

Posted November 17, 2017, by Abheetha Peiris (abheetha [dot] peiris [at] uky [dot] edu)

The Kentucky Bridge number should be 032C00032N

Posted November 14, 2017, by Andy Stone (akstone14 [at] gmail [dot] com)
Posted November 4, 2017, by Anonymous

Nothing there in historicaerials.

Posted November 4, 2017, by M Cox ((trock859[at]yahoo[dot]com))

I think that I may have found another bowstring truss!!!! It is literally like right there. It is just a few yards beyond the unmaintained side of the bridge. It appears to be over the Rough River. It looks like it still has it's deck. Looks like you can walk on it. I saw this from the satellite view. I think it might be a twin of the listed bridge. It is not as covered by the vegetation. If you look at the satellite, you'll see what I mean. 😃

Posted October 25, 2017, by Tom Hoffman

What? Were the old portals burned, blown down, or what? Also seeing pictures of the old covered bridge, it looks like it was a long single span(wonder how long).

Posted October 23, 2017, by Clark (jcembree [at] gmail [dot] com)

Even the remains of this bridge are being lost to time. Here is what it looks like as of October 2017

Posted October 13, 2017, by D. Franklin

The abandoned bridge in the foreground only carried a water main, was abandoned in the 1970's.

Posted September 30, 2017, by Walter Laughlin (laughlin [dot] robert [at] gmail [dot] com)

The original bridge at this location was a double-barrel covered bridge built by James Carrothers about 1832. It was burned during the Civil War. The second covered bridge was built in, I THINK, 1866 - I'll have to check the files. It was condemned and replaced in 1909. The second covered bridge was built of black walnut and the lumber was purchased by a local lumber yard and advertised for several years. The stonework dates to the original 1832 construction. No photographs of either covered bridge are known to exist.

Posted September 22, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Looks like a Marsh Arch on Steroids!

Posted September 22, 2017, by Mike Boyd (ammochief [at] aol [dot] com)

I agree with Tony and Wayne as well. I was surprised of all the references to it and as a visitor, just accidentally saw it as we were leaving. We had spent a lot of time looking for it. Then trying to find information on it after I got home was difficult.

I was told by a local contractor, there were only two of this type ever built in the US and this one is the only one still standing. Is this true?

Magnificent piece of history.

Posted September 13, 2017, by Mike Gregg (rdmikeg [at] gmail [dot] com)

Our company recently did some work on this bridge. The story that we were told was that KY DOT paid to have the bridge built back in the 70's. In turn IDOT was responsible for maintaining it.

Posted August 26, 2017, by Walter Laughlin (laughlin [dot] robert [at] gmail [dot] com)

Just FYI: The portal view is not Public Domain. NKY Views has permission to use it and I have no problem with it being posted here. The correct credit is Laughlin Collection. J. Winston Coleman Photograph. September 13, 1945. All Rights Reserved.

The oblique view is Public Domain - the photographer was Arnold Washburn, date unknown.

Posted August 20, 2017, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Amazing progress in a month and a half! The bridge looks great!

Regards,

Art S.

Posted August 20, 2017, by Jeff Wise (Gerdajeff [at] gmail [dot] com)

I helped move this bridge to its current location. Bridge is finally finished and ready for public use. Looks great!!!

Posted August 19, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

NBI gives a 1952 build date. Any reason for thinking 1945?

Posted August 18, 2017, by Royce and Bobette Haley (roycehaley111 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

It seems to me this bridge is actually functioning as a beam rather than a Kingpost.

Posted August 17, 2017, by Melissa Jurgensen

I have added pictures from my August 12, 2017 visit showing the damage. The property owner granted permission for me to see the bridge.

Posted August 16, 2017, by Melissa Jurgensen

I have added several photos from my August 12 visit. Dover has gone from a bridge that no one was worried about to one that many are worried about all in a matter of hours. My photos do not really show the extent of the damage - it is best appreciated when the bridge is seen in person. (That being said, if anyone visits the bridge do not enter it as it is in serious danger of collapse.) It needs emergency stabilization measures to be taken immediately. We can't lose this bridge.

Posted August 13, 2017, by Melissa Jurgensen

The bridge was severely damaged in flash flooding on July 22, 2017 and is barely hanging on. The landowner gave me permission to photograph it up close on August 12, 2017. Pictures will be added.