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Little Sandy River EL&BS Railroad Bridge 3

Photos 

Little Sandy River EL&BS RR Bridge 3

Photo taken by C Hanchey in June 2010

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BH Photo #167438

Map 

Facts 

Overview
Pratt through truss bridge over Little Sandy River on alignment of former Elizabethtown, Lexington and Big Sandy Railroad (now Old Fultz Road)
Location
Carter County, Kentucky
Status
Open to traffic
History
Built 1873 by the EL&BS Railroad; converted to use as a vehiclular bridge following railroad abandonment
Railroad
- Elizabethtown, Lexington & Big Sandy Railroad (EL&BS)
Design
Pratt through truss
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 148.0 ft.
Total length: 157.2 ft.
Deck width: 8.2 ft.
Also called
Elizabethtown, Lexington and Big Sandy Railroad Bridge
Approximate latitude, longitude
+38.28944, -82.95194   (decimal degrees)
38°17'22" N, 82°57'07" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
17/329292/4239732 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Grayson
Average daily traffic (as of 2006)
100
Inventory numbers
KY 022-C00053N (Kentucky bridge number)
BH 45476 (Bridgehunter.com ID)
Inspection report (as of April 2016)
Overall condition: Poor
Superstructure condition rating: Fair (5 out of 9)
Substructure condition rating: Satisfactory (6 out of 9)
Deck condition rating: Poor (4 out of 9)
Sufficiency rating: 20.2 (out of 100)
View more at BridgeReports.com

Update Log 

  • September 23, 2016: Updated by Christopher Finigan: Added category "Pin-connected"
  • September 23, 2016: New photos from Jack Schmidt
  • June 26, 2010: New photos from Bill Eichelberger
  • June 10, 2010: Added by C Hanchey

Sources 

  • C Hanchey - cmh2315fl [at] yahoo [dot] com
  • Bill Eichelberger
  • Jack Schmidt - jjturtle [at] earthlink [dot] net

Comments 

Little Sandy River EL&BS Railroad Bridge 3
Posted June 21, 2018, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Yes I agree they don't look like 1870s bridges, to heavy-duty looking... one more reason why its stupid to demolish them they probably are designed to handle a lot of weight. Minor repairs could go a long way to return them to a high weight limit.

Little Sandy River EL&BS Railroad Bridge 3
Posted June 21, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I also donít think that they are 1870s vintage. I suspect they date to the first decade of the 20th century.

Little Sandy River EL&BS Railroad Bridge 3
Posted June 21, 2018, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

To demolish these three bridges is absolutely stupid. I guarantee these bridges are in better condition than is suggested, particularly in regards to the metal trusses. And yes they actually ARE trying to destroy history, because they are NOT replacing the bridges and I guarantee these bridges are safe to simply close to traffic and leave standing. I laughed when I saw one of these bridges listed as "Imminent Failure" condition. Yeah right. There is absolutely no excuse to demolish these beautiful historic bridges. The claims of people moving the blocks is only an indication that the public WANTS these bridges available for use and thus they should be repaired and reopened to traffic. And if they wanted to avoid that problem then simply put permanent bollards and barriers in rather than removable barriers.

Little Sandy River EL&BS Railroad Bridge 3
Posted June 21, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)
Little Sandy River EL&BS Railroad Bridge 3
Posted May 17, 2017, by M Cox (trock859[at]yahoo[dot]com)

Closed to all traffic. Deck rotting away.