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KY773 Little Sandy River Bridge #2

Photos 

Photo taken by Bill Eichelberger in October 2008

Enlarge

BH Photo #126843

Map 

Street View 

Facts 

Overview
Through truss bridge over Little Sandy River on alignment of former Eastern Kentucky Railroad (now KY 773)
Location
Carter County, Kentucky
Status
Open to traffic
History
Built 1913; rehabilitated 1964
Railroad
- Eastern Kentucky Railroad (EK)
Design
Pratt through truss
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 127.9 ft.
Total length: 185.0 ft.
Deck width: 11.2 ft.
Vertical clearance above deck: 20.7 ft.
Also called
EK Railroad Bridge
Approximate latitude, longitude
+38.29944, -82.94722   (decimal degrees)
38°17'58" N, 82°56'50" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
17/329728/4240833 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Grayson
Average daily traffic (as of 2015)
1,910
Inventory numbers
KY 022-B00075N (Kentucky bridge number)
BH 18747 (Bridgehunter.com ID)
Inspection report (as of May 2016)
Overall condition: Poor
Superstructure condition rating: Poor (4 out of 9)
Substructure condition rating: Poor (4 out of 9)
Deck condition rating: Serious (3 out of 9)
Sufficiency rating: 2 (out of 100)
View more at BridgeReports.com

Update Log 

  • February 15, 2016: New photo from Art Suckewer
  • June 26, 2010: New photos from Bill Eichelberger
  • March 13, 2010: Updated by Bill Eichelberger: Added Google Street View.
  • October 30, 2008: New photo from Bill Eichelberger

Sources 

  • Bill Eichelberger

Comments 

KY773 Little Sandy River Bridge #2
Posted February 26, 2019, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I can't really recall seeing such a draped bottom chord on any railroad through truss. I have to imagine if it was structural failure instead of design, this bridge would be immediately closed.

KY773 Little Sandy River Bridge #2
Posted February 26, 2019, by Daniel

I would expect the load rating would be done by calculating the loads in each member and connection (and abutment) for dead load and live load (live at each frame, although generally in the middle will result in the largest loads), and then looking at what each member can hold in it's current condition. Then, calculate the live load that the bridge can safely take based on that.

Calculating the loads is trivial from an engineering standpoint, but I imagine determining what each member and connection can take in it's deteriorated state is as much an art as a science.

Given the deck rating of "serious", it may be the deck that limits the safe load rather than the structural components that were designed for railroad use. Not that the "poor" rating on superstructure and substructure is much better...

I noticed that the bottom chord appears to be draped significantly, not something I'm used to seeing.

KY773 Little Sandy River Bridge #2
Posted February 26, 2019, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I'm not sure that the fact these are old railroad bridges was calculated into the load rating. Even in poor condition, a railroad bridge can hold a very large load. I have reached out to the KY SHPO about preserving these bridges in place, as the new bridges will be on a different alignment.

KY773 Little Sandy River Bridge #2
Posted February 26, 2019, by Daniel

Of course the image they use for the article shows a truck driver disregarding the weight limit. Even empty a dump truck like that is WELL over 3 tons - double that is about right. Many modern pickups weigh 3 tons empty.

KY773 Little Sandy River Bridge #2
Posted February 25, 2019, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)
KY773 Little Sandy River Bridge #2
Posted May 17, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Not a 1913 bridge... More like ca.1890.

KY773 Little Sandy River Bridge #2
Posted May 17, 2017, by M Cox (trock859[at]yahoo[dot]com)

Slated for demolition and replacement. Get out to see it before it's gone!