Rating:
1 vote

Louisville, Cincinnati & Lexington Railroad Bridge

Photo 

Bridges Over the Licking River

This bridge is in the foreground. The bridge in the back is the active CSX bridge.

Photo taken by Geoff McKim in July 2018

Enlarge

BH Photo #430099

Map 

Facts 

Overview
Abandoned Through truss bridge over Licking River on former Louisville, Cincinnati & Lexington Railroad
Location
Latonia, Campbell County, Kentucky, and Kenton County, Kentucky
Status
Abandoned, but intact
Design
10-panel Camelback through truss
Approximate latitude, longitude
+39.05120, -84.49444   (decimal degrees)
39°03'04" N, 84°29'40" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
16/716818/4325446 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Newport
Inventory number
BH 44713 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • July 7, 2018: New photo from Geoff McKim
  • June 9, 2011: Updated by Bill Eichelberger: Changed name again and corrected errors left by someone else with no apparent clue of NKY geography.
  • June 5, 2011: Updated by Bill Eichelberger: Changed bridge name.
  • April 4, 2011: Updated by Bill Eichelberger: Changed description.
  • April 3, 2011: Updated by Bill Eichelberger: Changed name to reflect railroad heritage.
  • April 7, 2010: New photos from Bill Eichelberger
  • April 2, 2010: Added by Bill Eichelberger

Sources 

  • Bill Eichelberger
  • Geoff McKim

Comments 

Louisville, Cincinnati & Lexington Railroad Bridge
Posted September 16, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Are we sure this was a RR bridge? A news article that says this bridge may be reused for a trail (they are applying for a 1 million dollar grant, which I am not sure would be enough to reopen this bridge considering its tall and the approaches are gone) also the article says its a waterline bridge:

http://www.cincinnati.com/story/news/2015/09/16/bridge-rehab...

“This was an old bridge that the water district used to actually take water from Covington over to Wilder that has been abandoned,” Gardner said.

The bridge was built decades ago to hold a water line between Wilder and Covington, said Ron Lovan, president of the Northern Kentucky Water District. The water line hasn’t been used since the 1970s, he said. Approaches were taken out on both sides of the bridge after children were found to be using it to hang out and jump into the river, he said.

Louisville, Cincinnati & Lexington Railroad Bridge
Posted April 10, 2011, by Bill Eichelberger (wallyum [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I've got that all figured out. Steel climbing cables.

Since we're on the subject, this bridge reminds me of the LC&L Bridge: http://www.bridgehunter.com/pa/franklin/cumberland-valley-rr...

Definitely less burly than RR bridges that were to be built later.

Louisville, Cincinnati & Lexington Railroad Bridge
Posted April 10, 2011, by Anthony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Guys........my wits would never come between me a good "Bridgehunter challenge"......but my physique might! :)

Louisville, Cincinnati & Lexington Railroad Bridge
Posted April 9, 2011, by Bill Eichelberger (wallyum [at] hotmail [dot] com)

My wits have never stood in the way of a challenge. As a matter of fact, the older I get, the less they seem to impose an opinion. ;-)

Louisville, Cincinnati & Lexington Railroad Bridge
Posted April 8, 2011, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Bill, give my senility a couple of more years and we'll do it--unless you still have your wits about you!

A truly intriguing structure with a challenging access.

CV

Louisville, Cincinnati & Lexington Railroad Bridge
Posted April 7, 2011, by Bill Eichelberger (wallyum [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Clark, if you ever decide to do it, give me a heads up. I can be there in ten minutes. Literally. ;-)

Louisville, Cincinnati & Lexington Railroad Bridge
Posted April 7, 2011, by Matt Lohry

There seem to be aspects of this structure that support both arguments, but I would be inclined to say railroad bridge on this one too. Back in the day, railroad bridges were built lighter because train loads were lighter (see http://www.bridgehunter.com/mn/hennepin/bh45221/), but on the other hand, these lighter bridges were built back in the pin-connected bridge era. This particular bridge is rivet-connected, suggesting the possibility of a road crossing; but, this bridge's portal and width dimensions appear to be very similar to the other bridge, which makes me think it's a RR bridge from the 1910's built during the transition period from lighter to heavier, and the Warren is a heavier version from the 1930's.

Louisville, Cincinnati & Lexington Railroad Bridge
Posted April 6, 2011, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Looking at historical topo maps there is always a railroad crossing and never a road crossing at this location. Judging from the approach piers in the photos I'd go with railroad too. The taller height seems odd but it wouldn't be the first time someone had over engineered something. If I KNEW there would be a plaque up there I'd consider it a nifty summer trip to get up to photograph it. Canoe, line gun, ropes....

Louisville, Cincinnati & Lexington Railroad Bridge
Posted April 5, 2011, by Bill Eichelberger (wallyum [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Everything I've been told indicates a railroad bridge. I looked at the site on historicaerials.com and while the 1956 image is cut off before the bridge, two through truss approach spans can be seen on the east (Wilder, Campbell County) side of the bridge. The 1970 view shows what appears to be twin through truss approach spans on the west (Covington, Kenton County) side. It does seem to be quite a bit less sturdy than the bridge to the north. A peek at the builders plaque might clear up some of the questions, but I'm 48, and hauling my butt up that pier to check for one isn't high on my list of things to do. ;-) (It would be if I was 18.)

Louisville, Cincinnati & Lexington Railroad Bridge
Posted April 5, 2011, by Andy W (jitterz [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Are you sure it's not an abandoned road bridge? It's construction seems much lighter than the actual railroad bridge next to it, plus its elevation looks much higher- it would have been very unusual for a railroad to make the bridge that much higher than the roadbed to which it leads. Also, if you look at the satellite picture, there appears to be a stub of the old road to the west of the bridge.