Rating:
2 votes

Ashland Vicinity Kansas River Bridge

Photos 

Photo taken by Nick Schmiedeler in March 2017

Enlarge

BH Photo #382743

Map 

Video 

Ashland Vicinity (Manhattan, KS area) re-routed Kansas River Bridge....as Robert Elder describes, the bridge was abandoned after the Kansas River was naturally re-routed by one of the great floods over 100 years ago - cut and paste the URL in your browser to view

Nick Schmiedeler

Facts 

Overview
Abandoned Pratt through truss bridge over Kansas River (Former Channel) on Rosencutter Road (Abandoned Section)
Location
Riley County, Kansas
Status
Derelict/abandoned
History
Likely built ca. 1902. Abandoned sometime after the Flood of 1951.
Design
Pratt through truss
Approximate latitude, longitude
+39.14413, -96.60586   (decimal degrees)
39°08'39" N, 96°36'21" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
14/706903/4335500 (zone/easting/northing)
Inventory number
BH 75574 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Categories 

Abandoned (3,028)
Kansas (2,705)
Kansas River (31)
Lally columns (254)
Pin-connected (3,225)
Pratt through truss (4,595)
Pratt truss (8,008)
Riley County, Kansas (21)
Through truss (12,893)
Truss (29,445)

Update Log 

  • March 13, 2017: Updated by Robert Elder: Edited History.
  • March 13, 2017: New video from Nick Schmiedeler
  • March 11, 2017: New video from Nick Schmiedeler
  • March 11, 2017: Updated by Christopher Finigan: Added category "Pin-connected"
  • February 11, 2017: Updated by Robert Elder: Added category "Lally columns"

Sources 

  • Robert Elder - robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com
  • Nick Schmiedeler

Comments 

Ashland Vicinity Kansas River Bridge
Posted March 13, 2017, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

It looks like YouTube has changed their embed code in such a way that it doesn't work on this site. It may take awhile to fix this.

Ashland Vicinity Kansas River Bridge
Posted March 13, 2017, by Don Morrison

I guess the webmaster will have to look into the video linking thing.

This site:

http://www.rileycountyks.gov/333/1900-1910

states that the bridge at ashland was built 1902.

several other bridge construction dates are included as well.

Ashland Vicinity Kansas River Bridge
Posted March 13, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

I did try the "add video" - error boxed me. I will keep at it. Thanks for the nice comment on my backyard junk sculpture - its one of several hundred actually....along with bridgehunting it's my other obsession

Ashland Vicinity Kansas River Bridge
Posted March 12, 2017, by Don Morrison

If your signed in as an editor to the site, there's an "add video" button above the photos section at the top. You can easily add your YouTube video.

Ashland Vicinity Kansas River Bridge
Posted March 12, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Hey I found it and...

Nick's "World's Least Efficient Can Crusher" bowling ball rollercoaster.

Good stuff!

Ashland Vicinity Kansas River Bridge
Posted March 12, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

That is a eventuality for sure - Kaw does run a different course now but the ground all through that area is very marshy, how amazing would it be to be standing there recording when the end of that bridge does finally decide to go?

Ashland Vicinity Kansas River Bridge
Posted March 12, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I found the video online. Very interesting. I am glad that you mentioned the leaning lally column. I'm afraid that the southern span could become a three-legged bridge at some point.

Ashland Vicinity Kansas River Bridge
Posted March 12, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Problems with simple cut and paste of my short YouTube video posting here (help with that?), if you'd like to see the clip, search " Kansas Bridge Hunt" on YouTube it should come right up

Ashland Vicinity Kansas River Bridge
Posted March 12, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yes, I was noticing the lacing on the main verticals and the batten-connected hip verticals. Although this bridge may in fact be post-1900, it does have some unusual features.

I am not certain which company built this bridge. It seems to me that there was still some experimentation going on in the Midwest even after 1900. You can see this on some of the non-standard bridges in the region. Ie, the Asylum Bridge, Onion Creek Bridge, Long Shoals Bridge, all of which are post-1900.

In addition, this region features those strange pony truss bridges that are constructed of paired angles. I have long suspected that the Wayland Bridge Company in Washington, Kansas may have been responsible for them.

Given the diversity of builders in the Midwest, it might not be so surprising that we see some unusual details on post-1900 bridges and even on post-1910 bridges on occasion.

Ashland Vicinity Kansas River Bridge
Posted March 11, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Unusual lacing on the verticals of this one! And then the hip floorbeam hangers appear to be made from paired flat-rods or angles with battens. Rather odd.

Ashland Vicinity Kansas River Bridge
Posted March 11, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Based on the overall appearance of this bridge, the date of 1902 in the link that I posted in an earlier comment, may in fact be accurate. This does look like a bridge that might have been built in the first decade of the 20th century. Thanks as always to Nick for tracking it down. The snow is a nice touch.

Ashland Vicinity Kansas River Bridge
Posted March 11, 2017, by Anonymous

Nice!

Ashland Vicinity Kansas River Bridge
Posted March 11, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

ooooh this one....super-eery and giantly awesome - knocked on a property owner's door at the end of Rosencutter Road, got permission to head south and little west cross the tracks down the old deep rocky river bank to get to the old channel river bridge.... an absolute beauty, a fantastic experience, so glad to be made aware of it's existence from Robert's recent research.

Ashland Vicinity Kansas River Bridge
Posted February 11, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Reference to a bridge (possibly this one), being built at Ashland in 1902.

http://www.rileycountyks.gov/333/1900-1910

Ashland Vicinity Kansas River Bridge
Posted February 11, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Now, that this bridge has resurfaced, I have checked online, hoping to find a photograph. Thus far, I have found nothing. The south span is a 5 panel Pratt through truss with a length of roughly 110'. The northern span also appears to be a Pratt through truss, but it appears to be a bit longer at roughly 130'. According to the Riley County GIS, this bridge was still standing as of 2016.

How old is the bridge? I am not certain. It may have been built here after the Flood of 1903. If so, it is probably just a standardized Pratt through truss with A-frame portal bracing. On the other hand, it might be an older bridge that survived the Flood of 1903. If so, it might be a more interesting wrought iron structure.

When was it abandoned? I am not certain about that either. I would guess that the Kansas River changed courses in 1951, leaving most of the bridge on dry land (perhaps destroying a southern span or two, or three...). Yet, the 1954 Topo map shows the bridge still in use. Perhaps the bridge remained in service after the Flood of 1951, or perhaps the 1954 Topo map just did not get updated.

This bridge is VERY close to Manhattan, Kansas. For those familiar with the area, it is just below Stagg Hill and the Sunrise Cemetery. I would anticipate that the city will annex this area very soon if it has not already. I hope that the bridge can be preserved somehow, especially if it predates the Flood of 1903.

Ashland Vicinity Kansas River Bridge
Posted February 11, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The 1950 Topo Map on Historic Aerials showed a long lost bridge at this location. Figuring that it had been destroyed in the Flood of 1951, I zoomed in on Google Earth hoping to at least see some pylons. To my surprise, there were two truss spans still extant on the north side of the river! This bridge (at least part of it) is still in place!