Rating:
1 vote

Sappa Creek Bridge

Photos 

Taken for the NRHP

Enlarge

View this photo on Flickr

BH Photo #401118

Map 

Facts 

Overview
Pony truss bridge over Sappa Creek, 10.0 mi. north and 11.3 mi. west of Norton
Location
Norton County, Kansas
Status
Closed to all traffic
History
Built 1922
Builder
- Canton Bridge Co. of Canton, Ohio
Design
Lattice pony truss
Dimensions
Span length: 40.0 ft.
Total length: 40.0 ft.
Deck width: 15.4 ft.
Recognition
Posted to the National Register of Historic Places
Approximate latitude, longitude
+39.98710, -100.09882   (decimal degrees)
39°59'14" N, 100°05'56" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
14/406186/4426903 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Devizes
Land survey
T. 1 S., R. 25 W., Sec. 2
Inventory numbers
KS 000690525803020 (Kansas local bridge number on the National Bridge Inventory)
BH 18321 (Bridgehunter.com ID)
Inspection (as of 01/2006)
Superstructure condition rating: Fair (5 out of 9)
Substructure condition rating: Poor (4 out of 9)
Appraisal: Structurally deficient
Sufficiency rating: 22.0 (out of 100)
Average daily traffic (as of 2002)
5

Update Log 

  • August 26, 2017: New photos from Luke
  • January 16, 2017: Updated by Robert Elder: Added category "Curved Endposts"
  • June 20, 2016: Updated by Robert Elder: Edited Status and moved Pin.

Sources 

  • Robert Elder - robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com
  • KHRI - Kansas Historical Resources Inventory.
  • Luke

Comments 

Sappa Creek Bridge
Posted August 27, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

John:

Yes, I did get to visit a very similar one, also in Norton County:

http://bridgehunter.com/ks/norton/bh66429/

This is a very rare design that was built by the Canton Bridge Company. The bridge is essentially an inverted Kingpost truss with a lattice truss that acts as a stiffening member if I understand this right. The lattice truss also doubles as a railing. Nathan documented a similar Bridge in Ohio:

http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=oh...

Today, there are roughly two of these remaining in Kansas, two in Ohio, and one in Nebraska. There might be a few others hiding in the trees across the country as well. Regardless of the exact number, they are an extremely rare find today and each one should be considered to have high historic significance.

Sappa Creek Bridge
Posted August 26, 2017, by John Marvig

Robert,

Have you seen other bridges like this? This seems to be a unique structure to me.

Sappa Creek Bridge
Posted August 26, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yes, I believe that this is the one.

For those reading the Forum right now, we are discussing two separate bridges over the Sappa Creek, so this could be a bit confusing.

Sappa Creek Bridge
Posted August 26, 2017, by Luke

If https://www.flickr.com/photos/nrhpphotos/21638739776/ is a pic of this bridge, it's a Canton bridge.

Sappa Creek Bridge
Posted August 26, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Just out of curiosity, has anybody else known of any NRHP listed bridges that got transferred to private ownership after being listed? This would seem to be a bit unusual.

I have never spoken with the landowner who now owns this bridge apparently. I hope that he or she is willing to preserve it. It is an exceptionally unusual, and highly significant bridge.

Sappa Creek Bridge
Posted June 20, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

According to the KHRI database, this bridge is now owned privately.

KSHS page with photo.

http://khri.kansasgis.org/index.cfm?in=137-0000-00046