Rating:
3 votes

Bartel Farm Bridge

Photos 

Photo taken by Nick Schmiedeler in September 2017

Enlarge

BH Photo #401486

Map 

Description 

Originally spanning Doyle Creek on Wagonwheel Road Southwest of Florence, this 5-panel Pratt through truss was moved to the Bartel Family Farm to spare it from demolition. According to sources in the town of Florence it was built in 1887 possibly by the Kansas City Bridge & Iron Company, and historic photos of it do exist. The Bartel's are planning to do some work on the bridge and possible move it once again to a public location a couple miles to the Southwest in the town of Goessel.

Information provided by Nick Schmiedeler

KSHS Page for this bridge documented at it's original location: http://khri.kansasgis.org/index.cfm?tab=details&in=115-0000-...

Facts 

Overview
Pratt through truss bridge currently sitting on dry land at the Bartel Farm just east of Hillsboro
Location
Marion County, Kansas
Status
Derelict/Abandoned
Builder
- Kansas City Bridge & Iron Co. of Kansas City, Missouri (Possible fabricator)
Design
Pinned, 5-panel Pratt through truss
Dimensions
Span length: 80.1 ft.
Total length: 80.1 ft.
Deck width: 16.1 ft.
Vertical clearance above deck: 12.0 ft.
Also called
Old Wagonwheel Road Bridge
Doyle Creek Bridge
Approximate latitude, longitude
+38.34483, -97.17392   (decimal degrees)
38°20'41" N, 97°10'26" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
14/659577/4245653 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Hillsboro
Land survey
T. 20 S., R. 2 E., Sec. 2
Inventory number
BH 45478 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • September 2, 2017: Updated by Tony Dillon: Added new information provided by Nick Schmiedeler from his visit.
  • September 2, 2017: New photos from Nick Schmiedeler
  • June 12, 2010: Added by Sheldon

Related Bridges 

Sources 

  • Sheldon Wiens
  • Nick Schmiedeler
  • Tony Dillon - spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com

Comments 

Bartel Farm Bridge
Posted September 4, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

If the 1887 construction date is correct, the bridge could potentially be composed of both iron and steel. Both were in use at the time, but wrought iron was a popular material in the 1880s.

The CARNEGIE font seen here was generally used before 1895.

Bartel Farm Bridge
Posted September 4, 2017, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

".in case there's any doubt...."CARNEGIE" printed iron"

I was led to believe that Carnegie only made steel. Is it possible that the bridge is iron and steel?

At any case the Carnegie Steel Company was founded to separate Carnegie from his previous involvement in iron making. Carnegie saw steel as the future. His partners in the iron business did not think it was a good investment, so Carnegie went out on his own.

Bartel Farm Through Truss Bridge
Posted September 2, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Thanks - lots of fun, again, just really great folks, need more proponents of saving bridges out there! PS - sorry for all the misspelling on previous post - trying to punch in that long diatribe over a beer at Emporia's busy Radius Brewing pub while simultaneously watching the Royals get annihilated, very distracted....anyway, congrats to the Bartels and their work.

Bartel Farm Through Truss Bridge
Posted September 2, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nick:

This is some awesome work! Thank you for visiting this bridge and getting so many great photographs.

Hats off to the Bartel Family for saving this beautiful bridge! If they are reading this blog I certainly want to congratulate them and thank them for their efforts.

This bridge does in fact look like a Kansas City Bridge & Iron Co. product to me. The Kansas City Bridge & Iron Co., along with the Missouri Valley Bridge & Iron Co., both used angled lattice portal bracing. From what I have observed, the Kansas City Bridge & Iron Co. seems to have used larger portal bracings on their bridges as compared to the Missouri Valley Bridge & Iron Co. (with the span length being roughly the same).

Apparently I was right in my theory that this was the Doyle Creek Bridge. To be honest, I was really hoping that was the case. When I saw the KSHS photos of the Doyle Creek Bridge, I was really quite disappointed to see that it was lost - at least according to aerial imagery. When Sheldon heard about this bridge, it gave me some hope that maybe the Doyle Creek Bridge was still around. Sure enough, here it is!

What a beauty!

Bartel Farm Through Truss Bridge
Posted September 2, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

btw....in case there's any doubt...."CARNEGIE" printed iron

Bartel Farm Through Truss Bridge
Posted September 2, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

after listening to the explanation and seeing the positive energy involved with the family to keep this one upright, I have little doubt it will be seen again publically. Hard to tell, but some square-pole verticals, no plaques, and plenty of bullet dents and clean-through shots on that old wrought iron. Awesome time, great people. Go Bartels!! Thanks guys for showing me around. Please add any notes, I know I'm forgetting several things you told me.

Bartel Farm Through Truss Bridge
Posted September 2, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

after some ingenius engineering, the 70' bridge was placed between a truck and a trailer and driven slowly to their place. Their is now a tentative plan to straighten some of the damaged pieces and move it one more time to the town of Goessel. Best estimate by the knowledgeable Bartels along with what they've learned from Florence folks so far was a Kansas City product, 1887, and photos do ecist of this bridge in it's previous location at a historical society, and posdibly also on bridgehunter.com (?), they are familiar with this website, so (cont.)

Bartel Farm Through Truss Bridge
Posted September 2, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

on Wagon Wheel Rd just west of Florence, KS, which had become unhinged off it's foundation SEVERAL times over the decades, was going to be removed and taken to the scrapper, and replaced with a new bridge, so on Labor Day weekend 1998, Bartel's made a conscious decision to save it from that fate, and just put it on a trailer via crane and haul it to their property just east of Hillsboro. The wrought iron would be negligible scrap anyway, so (cont.)

Bartel Farm Through Truss Bridge
Posted September 2, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Stopped by the Bartel Farm today and introduced myself to the father and son, this was after I debated getting out of my car at all since a large German shepherd wad waiting for me in the driveway. Anyway SO this is the story - first of all, VERY nice people, and passionate about bridges! Dad Bartel told me he got wind in August 1998 that the Doyle Creek Bridge (cont.)

Bartel Farm Through Truss Bridge
Posted November 4, 2010, by Sheldon Wiens (sheldon_wiens77 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This bridge should be photographed. It is another historical structure.

Bartel Farm Through Truss Bridge
Posted June 15, 2010, by Anthony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

King would occasionally use "sideways" verticals as well. Perhaps it was more common in that region, as I am not as familiar with the Missouri based firms.

Speaking of "sideways" here is another unusual bridge from Nebraska. It features "sideways endposts and upper chords. King built this one in 1889.

http://bridgehunter.com/ne/otoe/C006610270/

Bartel Farm Through Truss Bridge
Posted June 15, 2010, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Concerning the lacing orientation, the Wrought Iron Bridge Company often used this design. Some local companies used parallel lacing as well. These included the Midland Bridge Company (Kansas City, MO), the Kansas City Bridge and Iron Company(Kansas City, MO), and the Missouri Valley Bridge and Ironworks (Leavenworth, KS).

The angled portal/knee bracing on the Doyle Creek Bridge was commonly used by the Kansas City Bridge and Iron Co. KCB&I frequently placed a plaque within the portal bracing as well.

This bridge shows both the parallel lacing (main span only), and that angled portal/knee bracing. http://www.bridgehunter.com/ks/butler/80865806307/

Bartel Farm Through Truss Bridge
Posted June 14, 2010, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yes, I am sure this mystery could be solved. Now to continue with the Dorothy theme from the weekend, I need to get back to Kansas! Unfortunately, I don't have any connections in Marion Co.

Bartel Farm Through Truss Bridge
Posted June 14, 2010, by Anthony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Robert, your theory about the bridge being moved to this location from Doyle Creek in not so far fetched. The Doyle Creek Bridge was(is) a 5 panel truss as the Bartel Bridge also appears to be. Through trusses with 5 panels are much less common that ones with 6 or more. Another uncommon feature of the Doyle Creek Bridge are the "sideways" verticals, meaning that the lacing orientation is not parallel to the truss. Unfortunately, it is impossible to tell from the Bird's eye view of the Bartel Bridge if this feature is shared.

I'm sure with some questioning of the local people it would be possible to solve this mystery.

Bartel Farm Through Truss Bridge
Posted June 14, 2010, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I have checked the KSHS site and have not found a page for this bridge. Based on Bing Bird's Eye, this bridge does look very similar to this lost bridge in the same county: http://www.bridgehunter.com/ks/marion/570863005445/

For now there are two theories:

1. This bridge has escaped detection until now.

2. The "lost" bridge was moved across the county to this location. I may be grasping at straws here, but I can't rule out the theory based on my limited information.

Bartel Farm Through Truss Bridge
Posted June 12, 2010, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is a great discovery! I will check the KSHS site to see if they have documented this bridge. I am glad to see that the landowner and/or county officials allowed this bridge to be placed next to the creek instead of being demolished.

Bing Maps does have Bird's Eye coverage for this bridge.