Rating:
1 vote

North Branch Verdigris River Bridge

Photos 

This bridge is on private property. You need prior approval to photograph it.

Photo taken by Ron Reber in September 2016

Enlarge

BH Photo #365753

Map 

Facts 

Overview
Pratt pony truss bridge over North Branch Verdigris River on Private Driveway
Location
Lyon County, Kansas
Status
Open to traffic
Design
Five panel, pin-connected, Pratt pony truss
Approximate latitude, longitude
+38.18707, -96.32845   (decimal degrees)
38°11'13" N, 96°19'42" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
14/733977/4229945 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Shaw Creek
Inventory number
BH 72831 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Categories 

Kansas (2,728)
Lyon County, Kansas (62)
One-lane traffic (7,433)
Open (36,888)
Owned privately (1,308)
Pin-connected (3,300)
Pony truss (15,080)
Pratt pony truss (3,199)
Pratt truss (8,069)
Truss (29,545)
Verdigris River (31)

Update Log 

  • September 22, 2016: New photos from Ron Reber
  • July 18, 2016: Updated by Robert Elder: Added categories "Pin-connected", "Verdigris River", "One-lane traffic"

Sources 

  • Robert Elder - robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com
  • Ron Reber

Comments 

North Branch Verdigris River Bridge
Posted January 11, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge generated some good discussion a few months ago. A similar bridge has been found in neighboring Greenwood County.

http://bridgehunter.com/ks/greenwood/370953405967/

North Branch Verdigris River Bridge
Posted July 19, 2016, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Tony, it wasn't the design of a bridge company it was one of the early state-designed standard plan type bridges in Michigan (which was in fact a leader in developing state standard plans for bridges). C. V. Dewart who wrote that article I linked to was the first engineer for the highway department and is likely responsible for the unusual design. He certainly was an engineer with some unusual ideas as he also designed Michigan's unique Concrete Camelback Bridges. As early as 1905 (the year the department was formed) the department was tasked with providing the townships and counties with design recommendations for bridges For example, pin-connected truss bridges were recommended only for spans greater than 100 feet. The highway department was created in part to combat quality issues with bridge company designed bridges not being up to par.

Anyway because it was the design of a state highway department engineer and not a bridge company this is why you don't see the specific knee brace design I am showing in other states. Most knee braces are smaller like this example here in Kansas.

North Branch Verdigris River Bridge
Posted July 19, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I've never seen any supports like these... Might have been a builder specific to Michigan.

Could almost call these "Inriggers"! ;-)

North Branch Verdigris River Bridge
Posted July 18, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks for those links. I can't remember if I have encountered these features on a highway bridge before.

North Branch Verdigris River Bridge
Posted July 18, 2016, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Tony, perhaps you recall the term from the usage by the Michigan State Highway Department to describe its standard ponies with inward-facing "outriggers" which MSHD called knee braces? See second article: http://historicbridges.org/michigan/grout/article.pdf from this page http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=mi...

North Branch Verdigris River Bridge
Posted July 18, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks for the reply. Have you found them to be associated with a particular builder?

North Branch Verdigris River Bridge
Posted July 18, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I've seen them on a few pinned Pratt ponies around Indiana Robert, not overly common though. The term "knee brace" comes to mind...although I can't quote just where I heard it at. I would say it's definitely supposed to help keep the verticals at 90 degrees to the floor beams, but I doubt it would do much good upon impact with a vehicle.

North Branch Verdigris River Bridge
Posted July 18, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is a rather unusual Pratt pony truss. In lieu of outriggers, it has angled braces that connect the vertical members with the floor beams. These members are inside the truss, but I don't know their technical name. They are commonly found on railroad bridges, not on highway bridges.

Photo: http://ke2013.smugmug.com/keyword/bridge/i-hHRL2rN/A

This bridge appears to be owned privately, but is easily visible from the county road. A supplemental ford is located a short distance upstream.