Rating:
1 vote

Hickory Creek Bridge

Photos 

Photo taken by Nick Schmiedeler in January 2017

Enlarge

BH Photo #374868

Map 

Facts 

Overview
Pony truss bridge over Hickory Creek, 1.5 mi. east of Peoria
Location
Franklin County, Kansas
Status
Closed
History
Built ca. 1920
Design
Pratt pony truss
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 48.9 ft.
Total length: 49.9 ft.
Deck width: 13.7 ft.
Approximate latitude, longitude
+38.58582, -95.12112   (decimal degrees)
38°35'09" N, 95°07'16" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
15/315253/4272949 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Rantoul
Inventory numbers
KS 000301059004945 (Kansas local bridge number on the National Bridge Inventory)
BH 17730 (Bridgehunter.com ID)
Inspection (as of 12/2009)
Deck condition rating: Fair (5 out of 9)
Superstructure condition rating: Fair (5 out of 9)
Substructure condition rating: Fair (5 out of 9)
Appraisal: Structurally deficient
Sufficiency rating: 30.2 (out of 100)
Average daily traffic (as of 2007)
5

Categories 

Built during 1920s (8,774)
Closed (2,409)
Franklin County, Kansas (32)
Kansas (2,705)
One-lane traffic (7,422)
Owned by county (18,855)
Pony truss (15,051)
Pratt pony truss (3,172)
Pratt truss (8,008)
Span length 25-50 feet (13,587)
Structurally deficient (18,442)
Total length 25-50 feet (9,861)
Truss (29,445)

Update Log 

  • January 1, 2017: Updated by Robert Elder: Closed.
  • January 1, 2017: New photos from Nick Schmiedeler

Sources 

  • Nick Schmiedeler
  • Robert Elder - robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com

Comments 

Hickory Creek Bridge
Posted January 21, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Hi Moose. I would never intentionally trespass. Took me a bit to figure out but went one block E of Utah off Marshall, and drove S to graveyard, then walked S and W along creek line to bridge

Hickory Creek Bridge
Posted January 3, 2017, by Moose (moose [dot] petersen [at] gmail [dot] com)

I went last week to this one. We came via the North side and arrived at a controlled entry of Utah and that is as far as my group got. We didn't want to trespass.

Hickory Creek Bridge
Posted January 2, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

It looks like it's all bolted. The attachments of the floor beams to the trusses and stringers is hard to see but looks unusual. I wonder if the county records would give any clues as to the probably local builder.

Hickory Creek Bridge
Posted January 2, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

That makes sense. Dual purpose fits in well with the concept of low budget.

Hickory Creek Bridge
Posted January 2, 2017, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I don't think crash-testing was even a major thought for a bridge like this. Economy is best achieved through multiple purposes: so I suspect the horizontal member is a crude railing and a stiffener. Compare it to this bridge: http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=tr...

Hickory Creek Bridge
Posted January 2, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Tony:

At first I thought that this was a low budget guardrail as well. But, I began to doubt myself when I noticed that this horizontal member seems to be integrated into the truss instead of being completely inside the truss. I suspect that if a vehicle was to hit the member, than it could in turn damage the truss,even if only slightly. I base this theory on the fact that the member is riveted to the intermediate diagonal connections and originates from between the angles that form the endposts.

Thus, after staring at this bridge for a while, I began to suspect that the horizontal member may have some sort of stabilizing function.

I don't recall seeing any other pony truss exactly like this one. As a final note, the endposts seem to curve seamlessly to become the top chords. This is yet another odd feature of this bridge.

Hickory Creek Bridge
Posted January 1, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Might that be an "Economy" guardrail Robert?

Hickory Creek Bridge
Posted January 1, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Hell... I'll be doing good if I stop putting 2016 by the end of January!

Thanks for the Kudos Nick! (and Robert!), and I concur with Robert... Nick you are doing a crazy amount of legwork to hunt these hidden Gems down! I'm a little envious because a)I'm too far away and b)My legs don't work good enough anymore to do near the amount of walking that you are doing!

Happy 2017! And keep up the good work!!

Hickory Creek Bridge
Posted January 1, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks, Nick. I have learned a lot from Tony, Nathan, and others on here. We all appreciate the legwork you have put into finding these long-abandoned bridges.

Hickory Creek Bridge
Posted January 1, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Good stuff, Robert. Always enjoy the engineering observations - picked up several things this past year to look for following notes from you and Tony and others.

Hickory Creek Bridge
Posted January 1, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Another thing...this bridge has a strange horizontal member running the full length of the truss.

This is another one of the unusual bridges in the area. To make matters even more interesting, it appears to have been built in the latter part of the truss era, when truss bridges were largely a standardized lot.

Hickory Creek Bridge
Posted January 1, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I will probably write 2016 for a while as well.

This is a strange little bridge. At first glance, it looks like a garden variety ca. 1920 Pratt pony truss. Yet, upon closer inspection, a couple of oddities are noticeable.

1. It is composed of lightweight angles. I have suspected that the Wayland Bridge Company in Washington, Kansas was responsible for similar bridges in the area, but I cannot confirm that for certain. Nor can I say that they built this one. Alternatively, this bridge might have simply been a low budget structure designed for very light traffic on a minor road. Again, this is just conjecture.

2. This bridge has extra vertical members that run from the top chord down to the intermediate diagonal intersections. A close inspection would reveal if these members are original, or were added in an attempt to strengthen the bridge.

Hickory Creek Bridge
Posted January 1, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Whoop!! Still not used to idea of "2017"....visited 1/1/2017

Hickory Creek Bridge
Posted January 1, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Happy New Year !! 1/1/16 - visited this bridge today, and it is VERY MUCH NOT OPEN to traffic. Both N and S ends of road cut off to bridge, looks like many years ago. Guessing locals paved the decking long ago. Very solid, looks to be still in use to neighboring property owners only.