Recent Kansas Comments

Post a comment Contact webmaster

Posted May 20, 2018, by Anonymous

Thanks, I will have a look.

Posted May 19, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Here is a copy of the bridge book, which comes from a Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway bridge book from 1937, provided by the Fred M. and Dale M. Springer Archives.

Posted May 19, 2018, by Anonymous

Yes, the area around the Main Street Bridge has been altered greatly. The river has been channelized through there. The Marais des Cygnes River has a terrible history of flooding, and Ottawa needed to build a levee system to protect the town.

At one time, there were three truss bridges right next to each other over the river. Locust Street, the railroad bridge, and the Main Street Bridge.

Posted May 19, 2018, by Anonymous

Kansans tend to frown very strongly on any River related activities. Almost all rivers are considered privately owned except the Missouri, Kansas, and Arkansas. Thus, if you are canoeing on the Marais des Cygnes, Neosho, Verdigris, etc, you could potentially get reported for trespassing.

Posted May 19, 2018, by Luke

I've waded/swam in both College and Squaw Creeks.

Made money off the latter. :')

Posted May 19, 2018, by Don Morrison

I've canoed or tubed most of the rivers in the Story and Boone county area, and the Mitchell, Howard, and Winnesheik county area up north. The Maquoketa near Painted Rocks park is nice too.

Probably how I came to love those old iron trusses. 8^)

Floated over that low weir north of Ames off of Arrasmith Trail once. Ugh.

Posted May 19, 2018, by Luke

Iowa has a LOT of beautiful canoeing spots, despite all the crappy low-head dams.

Posted May 19, 2018, by Don Morrison

Possibly there was a park along the dam pool and people canoed there.

Surprised to hear that canoeing is limited in Kansas.

My favorite stream, the Upper Iowa River, is classified as non-meandered, so the land is private, only the water is public. Even so, it is the possibly the most popular canoe destination in the state.

Here's the old 2000 canoe guide.

http://publications.iowa.gov/15395/1/Iowa%20Canoe%20Guide%20...

Posted May 19, 2018, by Don Morrison

Fortunately, it appears that "ILoveBridges" was at one time traced to the Wichita area by wikipedia, so we might have a local resident there with more info on the Orme street ATSF bridge.

lol

Posted May 19, 2018, by Don Morrison

Hmmmm...

The ATSF bridge formerly crossing the Arkansas river at Orme Street in Wichita does not seem to appear on BH. Could it be 533A? Map seems to show a crossing there until circa 1970.

Posted May 19, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Thanks cAPs Look and speeel cheerk get me every time!

Posted May 19, 2018, by Case Study

Maybe cAPS lOCK wasn't such a good idea in this cASE.

Posted May 19, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Robert,

No Information was given except for that it crossed the Arkansas River. I will post the record later this evening

Posted May 19, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

For those of us who are not railroad experts, where was bridge 553A? I am guessing the answer is not available on Google.

Posted May 19, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yep thatís the one. Thanks for the add! This structure replaced a through truss.

Posted May 19, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

John Believe this to be the one

Posted May 19, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Robert,

The bridge I refer to is just to the west of Main Street. It was replaced with a series of I-Beams.

Posted May 19, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein
Posted May 19, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Art Think the Dam was at Walnut

Posted May 19, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Ott Dam removed 1959

Posted May 19, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

John:

There is still a truss bridge on the west side of town. It now serves as a rail trail. The chanelization project started just east of that bridge.

Posted May 19, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Robert,

I know there was a truss on the ATSF route heading south over the river. I believe it was replaced in the 60s? Iíll look further into it later this evening.

Posted May 19, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The Marais des Cygnes River has been channelized through the entire Ottawa area. I suspect that this channelization process led to the destruction of any remaining historic bridges over the river in Ottawa.

This area once had an incredible collection of truss bridges, some of which were very ornate.

Posted May 19, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

thanks Robert!

Posted May 16, 2018, by Art S (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Interesting. The predecessor had vertical endposts in the middle but angled ones at the ends - made to resemble a continuous truss but function like a two span.

Posted May 15, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

1910 postmark

Posted May 15, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Predecessor to this bridge?

Posted May 14, 2018, by Bob Franke

MoPac bridge #41 @ pole 355/28.

Posted April 30, 2018, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

Any idea why they took the rivets out?

Posted April 28, 2018, by Larry Hornbaker (larryhornbaker [at] outlook [dot] com)

Stopped by this beautiful bridge recently and noticed some repair work on a plate with newer bolts and nuts next to the original rivets.

Posted April 22, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

looks like odd mix of old and older....lattice looks older than this bridge, but way it's attached looks original - neat one that my GPS says is in fact technically in OK, but whatever - on State Line Rd. (aka Treece Rd.), not much traffic here, not much anything here

Posted April 17, 2018, by Richie Kennedy (richiekennedy56 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Sadly, this bridge was lost to fire on April 16, 2018. Photos and video of the fire can be found here:

https://www.facebook.com/tyler.litch.9/posts/102154380082819...

Posted April 16, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I have the build dates of this structure in my records. I will post them. To me, the bridge appears to be a standardized span

Posted April 16, 2018, by Dylan VanAntwerp (dylan_vanantwerp [at] live [dot] com)

The bridge was lost somewhere between 2008-2010, as historic aerials has aerial imagery of the bridge still intact that is dated to 2008. The bridge is gone in the 2010 image. It definitely looks to have been a flood victim, judging by how badly one of the main piers was pushed over. This line seems to have been sold off to the present day SKOL Railroad quite a long time ago. A 1986 ATSF Middle Division Track Chart (KS & OK) does not list this line under ATSF ownership.

Posted April 16, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks to Debra for the new photograph. I am glad that the bridge is still standing, but it could collapse at any moment. That pylon is precarious to say the least.

This one needs immediate action to save it. Otherwise, somebody is looking at an expensive environmental cleanup.

Posted April 16, 2018, by Debra McKee (Debbymc56 [at] sbcglobal [dot] net)

Still standing - still looks like the east side could come down at any time. Visited on 4/14/2018

Posted April 16, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

lovely little spot

Posted April 14, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

2nd visit last weekend - little frosty but worth seeing again

Posted April 14, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Very cool spot - old bridge on same line just to east of this obviously removed, but this one pretty solid, rails removed, date-stamped abutments, snowed early AM, warmed up quick, melting as I left

Posted April 14, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I am amazed that this one has not been demolished. As of a few years ago it was considered a high priority for replacement because it was thought to be just like the I-35W Bridge in Minneapolis. Apples and oranges.

Posted April 13, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Not seen one like this in Kansas. Love this thing. "Majestic" comes to mind....very cool

Posted April 13, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Hearty old sucker....top-east end of the staircasing Gallup Rd.

Posted April 13, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

This one has been REPLACED

Posted April 13, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

This one rather remote, and somewhat spooky. Walking down the old right-of-way from the east you first come to a large gap between mounds on the road where an old bridge obviously once stood, next not far west is a sold 2 span pony, next further west is this bridge, maybe 80-100 yards long with a giant sea of fine sand beneath it on both sides, bobcat, deer, and other animal tracks visible in the sand, bridge a little bit in shambles but mostly solid - fascinating old road, would love more background on it

Posted April 13, 2018, by Anonymous

This bridge has had an extra diagonal with turnbuckle added. This is an interesting little modification.

Posted April 13, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

love the skeweds....hope this one has an even longer life

Posted April 13, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Check the adjusted pin position. Still shown in 2017 NBI.

Posted April 13, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Possible to change status on this one to "replaced" ? Thanks!

Posted April 12, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Visited again this weekend, sans 4 tons of greenery. Better look this time of year.

Posted April 12, 2018, by Matt Lohry

I question whether the sufficiency and traffic count figures are actually for this bridge...it appears to be basically serving as someone's driveway, as the road ends at a house just past (west of) the bridge. The ADT of 30 seems much higher that what it could realistically be...and, if a bridge like this could score anything above 5, let alone 57, I would be amazed.

Posted April 12, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Bridge pin should be moved a little north, it is at the end of dead-end Rd. 30 that leads into private property on other dide, just south of Independence Rd. Neat little thing, long curvy on Independence Rd. to get there, pretty desolate.

Posted April 11, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Elvis has been spotted. Creepy doesn't quite describe the walk to this one. A sea of sand everywhere, with wild cat tracks everywhere. Made it to the looooong abandoned concrete bridge on same closed right of way few yards west of this also - even more creepy.....

Posted April 11, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is quite interesting. A group of people have put a special walkway over the bridge. This is an especially interesting development given the remote location of the bridge.

You can't say that Kansans don't love their truss bridges. Now, hopefully the Whitewater River will behave itself and not take out that pylon.

Posted April 11, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Visited this past weekend, new walkway has been put down for hikers and bicyclists I'm assuming, stone pillars still in the same precarious standing, overall entire bridge seems very sketchy but very happy to see it still relatively in one piece, great piece of KS history, a low-water crossing, albeit extremely steep and rather dangerous looking, sits on the side

Posted April 11, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

This is the bridge at that exact pinned spot. And road is OPEN, as is bridge, not closed, to traffic. Not exactly what was expected there....

Posted April 10, 2018, by Luke
Posted April 7, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The center pier in photo 3 looks different from photos 2 and 4.

Posted April 4, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

This one is no more

Posted April 4, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

This is the same bridge as McKnab Bridge posted on Cowley County page.

Posted April 3, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

It disappears after the 2004 NBI.

Posted April 3, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

New bridge here.

Posted April 2, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

I have to agree with Kevin. Look at the east end of each bridge. The west bridge sits right on an abutment, the east bridge has several approach spans.

Posted April 2, 2018, by Ross Brown (bluehavanaross [at] gmail [dot] com)

Google Earth historical imagery shows that this collapsed between 2000 and 2002.

Posted April 2, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Satellite shows Sycamore Creek just east of next intersection to east of pin, also the bridge has been replaced with new concrete snoozer

Posted April 2, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

This one....correct pin? Zero satellite evidence.

Posted April 2, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

hmmm....not quite following - this is the RR bridge on this page's pinned spot, not the one to the east

Posted March 25, 2018, by Adam Catlin (acatlin [at] wellingtondailynews [dot] com)

Can I use this pic in the newspaper?

Posted March 19, 2018, by Luke

Erie was also a fan of quadrangular lattices.

Posted March 19, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

John,

I am not sure of the total count, but New York State has some too, it appears the New York Central Railroad used lattice trusses (quadruple intersection) sometimes.

There are a few highway lattice trusses in America, not many though.

Here is one of the New York Central lattice trusses:

http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=ne...

Posted March 19, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Hearty old thing. Pretty remote, low traffic area would seem.

Posted March 19, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Wow - great stuff, thanks for the very thorough info....quite unique and beautiful

Posted March 19, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Cool old rhing. VERY long pedestrian bridge. Like the outrigger-type things holding the pipes. Neat history.

Posted March 19, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

One thing worth noting is that these were exclusively railroad bridges. Based on the count given by bridgehunter, I've found these counts:

10 left in Kansas

21 left in Illinois

15 left in Iowa

3 left in Michigan

5 left in Minnesota

8 left in Nebraska

23 left in South Dakota

21 left in Wisconsin

Three railroads in the midwest/western states used these designs, including Union Pacific, the Chicago & North Western and the Rock Island. The C&NW used them between the late 1870s and late 1920s, while Rock Island used them between the late 1870s and about 1900, and Union Pacific exclusively used them in the 1890s and early 1900s. The design evolved relatively little between the 1870s structures of Leighton Bridge & Iron Works and the 1920s structures of American Bridge Company

Posted March 19, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nick:

There are a few of these lattice trusses left in Kansas. If you want to see a large number of them you would want to head for the Upper Midwest and Great Lakes area. The Dakotas, Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan have a massive number of these bridges. I believe that New England might have a few examples as well.

Most examples outside of Kansas, are quadrangular intersectional lattice trusses. Most examples in Kansas are triple intersectional lattice trusses. The triple intersectional variety is rarely found in other states.

Posted March 19, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Ran into this one by accident leaving the Jellison Bridge across street on Ft. Hays State Univ. campus - a beauty, my 1st lattice bridge - many left in Kansas?

Posted March 17, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Itís also worth noting that it appears that the bridge in the Postcard was relocated to Washington State:

http://bridgehunter.com/wa/yakima/85931000000000/

Iím hoping as the western states become more developed on Bridgehunter, that we can find more Pegrams. I would assume thereís still a handful that we donít know about.

Posted March 17, 2018, by Rich Kaduce (rkaduce [at] outlook [dot] com)

The location of the bridge in the postcard appears to be the same as the railroad bridge just south of the K-18 highway bridge BH47755. A 1955 USGS map shows this as a U.P. bridge going over Wildcat Creek. The present bridge was probably built to handle the heavy loads going to Fort Riley. There is a second bridge in the background of the postcard which is probably a Rock Island bridge. The hill in the background also fits well at this location.

Posted March 12, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nick:

I have only made one drive over this bridge. It was late at night, so I did not get a good look at the bridge - other than knowing that it was a Pratt truss.

I returned shortly thereafter and found that the bridge had been closed. It has always been in rough condition since I can remember - ie bullet holes in the plaques. The main difference is that one plaque is missing now.

Nathan did a good write-up of this bridge on his website. He noted that the bridge has had some modifications over the years.

http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=ka...

Posted March 12, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

First photos in some time, doesn't look like much has changed except a few nails defying gravity off the decking, some horizontals thrown about the north side, and some rust/gunshot through the one existing plaque on south side, quite a beauty, hard to believe cars and trucks still trying to balance on running boards a short 17 years ago when still open.

Posted March 5, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is one of a few bridges in Kansas and Missouri that combine rolled verticals with cruciform outriggers.

A slightly larger example in Atchison County has cast iron bearing shoes.

http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=ka...

This bridge does not have the bearing shoes.

Posted March 5, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

re-visit this weekend, This time approaching from south side, got a much better view and of course this time of year with the leaves being down many more elements exposed

Posted March 2, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Old article, but worth reading. This bridge suffered severe damage during the 2016 floods, but it was scheduled to be repaired, not demolished.

http://www.kansas.com/news/local/article98470192.html

Posted March 1, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)
Posted February 26, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Butler County currently features a photograph of this bridge on its website:

https://www.bucoks.com/364/Road-Closures-Construction-Zones

Posted February 23, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge might have gotten a brief mention in P.E. Lane's 1889 Catalogue. The catalogue mentions a 150' span with stone pylons in Butler County. I have a suspicion that this might be the bridge.

Nathan has a link to the catalogue here:

http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=in...

http://historicbridges.org/indiana/darden/pelane.pdf

After you open the PDF, scroll down to page 13. You will see a few Butler County bridges listed in the column on the right.

The catalogue depicts the sheer diversity of bridges that were fabricated by P.E. Lane. This was a company that did a great amount of experimentation with truss designs. Despite the diversity in design, one factor that remains common to all P.E. Lane structures is the substantial amount of lacing and ornamentation used on their bridges. The catalogue illustrates this quite well - as would be expected of Victorian Era advertisement.

Posted February 21, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge was demolished today. 2018 has gotten off to a terrible start for bridge preservation in Kansas.

Posted February 19, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Pardon the dangling modifier in my previous comment.

Posted February 19, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

P.E. Lane built a few pony trusses in Coffey County. I would not rule them out as a potential builder of the smaller pony truss.

Posted February 19, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

According to that catalogue, P.E. Lane built at least three bridges in Barton County with span lengths of 90, 100, and 120 feet. This might be the 120 foot span, if P.E. Lane rounded up a bit.

Posted February 19, 2018, by Gil Graham, P.E. (ggraham [at] baileybridge [dot] com)

Interesting situation. It appears the abutments must be leaning in causing the bottom chord to go into compression. On a two panel bridge like this, a truss analysis would show that the bottom chords carry zero load anyway. All of the "tension" load is carried by the truss end diagonals. You can also see the counter diagonal rod sagging from compression like the bottom chord.

Posted February 18, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nick:

Nathan has a link to a P.E. Lane catalogue. You can find it here:

http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=in...

Posted February 18, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

thanks Clark, makes way more sense for the existence of this bridge - camped in park that night, woke to several truckloads of hunters and their dogs out early for uuh...whatever hunting season this is, not a hunter...

Posted February 18, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

yes, bottom chord not only not under tension, but drooping pretty drastically on both sides, the drive over to do a U-turn and drive back over again were a bit of a life-gamble....not sure how many more drive-overs this thing has left in it

Posted February 18, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Road was there on the 1979 map but lake was not.

Posted February 18, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Unusual to place a pony on laced columns. I wonder what the connection is like.

Posted February 18, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The lower chord seems not to be under tension. I wonder how much everything shifts when under load.

Posted February 18, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nick:

Those bizarre features you have discovered are known as laced top chords and laced bottom chords. These are extremely rare features today.

Some bridges have laced endposts as well. This bridge has laced endposts a lace top cord and a laced bottom cord. As far as lacing is concerned it hits the trifecta. That makes this bridge very unusual.

Posted February 17, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

remnants of this removed bridge sitting in ice today.....bet it was cool back when

Posted February 17, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

also, not sure I've seen that laced "running board" and top horizontal before....this one seems unique

Posted February 17, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

this is one wanky, dilapidated old beat-up bedstead-type, basically at the end of a dead-end road before it turns to private property, I imagine it is rarely used at all anymore, I took a short video clip jumping up and down on the deck and gently pushing on the iron, I had to stop it was shaking so badly - would have to say on the new scale, this one would definitely qualify with a "poor" rating