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Posted September 20, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

VERY sad to say this queenpost has been replaced by....wth ya call this mess

Posted September 19, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

This county map shows the old rail line and can help you locate at least three crossings still visible from above.

http://www.ksdot.org/Assets/wwwksdotorg/bureaus/burTransPlan...

Posted September 19, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

On further satellite inspection, there is a short-length wooden train bridge to the south and east of the camp-approach road in the middle of that field over the creek on an old line that looks like it would have curved to the north and west and connected to the giant wooden tussle that still remains in shambles (see photos)

Posted September 19, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

This one pretty dang remote considering close to a decent size town - looks older than 1910, tall sucker, solid

Posted September 19, 2018, by Don Morrison

Hmmmm...

If you use Google Earth 1991 imagery, the old ROW is still visible and there does appear to be a trestle there.

Problem is that using Google Earth's ruler tool suggests that this is 1.35 miles south of Hwy 36 and the description is 2.7 miles south 1 mile East of Mankato.

I might suggest 39.745156, -98.175749 as the location of the bridge on this page, but I'm uncertain. 1991 imagery isn't that great, but it may be a pony. 2018 imagery looks like a culvert.

Posted September 18, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Certainly an uncertain relation...Ö...

Posted September 18, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

There are two Missouri Pacific trestles east and south of here. I don't see any historic references showing a crossing at this location although there clearly is one.

Additionally, this may be the former location of the county "Poor Farm" as the nearby cemetery is named the Poor Farm Cemetery.

Posted September 18, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Awesome field work as ALWAYS, Nick. Thanks

Posted September 18, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

This one is recently replaced

Posted September 18, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Drove all around this property - it is a camp, with 2 small fairly-recrntly-made creek crossing bridges, and the shambles of a very old and gigantic wooden RR bridge which shows up on satellite very much looking like a pony of some sort, but is not. If this is not the Unnamed Creek Bridge correctly assigned to this listing I am not exactly sure where on this property it might be

Posted September 18, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Thanks, Art !!

Posted September 18, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Mike,

I agree with your theory. Railroads were very into reusing spans that still had some life left in them. In fact, this article is a very interesting read:

https://books.google.com/books?id=zRRHAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA146&lpg=...

I believe I have a location where this truss could have been moved to:

http://bridgehunter.com/ks/labette/bh36330/

This is also a 140' truss (the measured distance between the east abutment on this bridge and the western pier, which appears to be a former abutment). Located Labette County, the bridge was relocated there around 1953. I've found that sometimes bridge parts could be in storage for several years. I believe there is a good change that the Salt Creek Bridge could be the original location.

Posted September 18, 2018, by Mike Boehne (mikebon088 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thinking about this....

Frisco used quite a few ~100-foot truss spans, and the stone pier on the west bank looks wide enough to support a truss. The 52-foot spans look older than 1951 but Frisco moved steel spans around quite a bit. Possibly the new piers and used spans were moved in to replace an old truss.

Posted September 18, 2018, by Mike Boehne (mikebon088 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Former Frisco bridge on Carthage-Wichita line. Frisco steel bridge book says two 52-foot DPG and two 25-foot I-beams, installed in 1950. Not clear if that's the bridge or just the I-beams but the pictures look like just the I-beams.

Posted September 8, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Thanks

Posted September 6, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Nice one. 7' tall. Very remote.

Posted September 6, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

....and some signs of repairs over the years, and disrepairs - few blocks fallen/washed down creek

Posted September 6, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Glad noone gave up on this one.....there is an unmapped road "Wagon Wheel" that is in fact still open running on W side of creek, right behind local K-12 Centre School (not "Center") all the way N to bridge and beyond, way too muddy today to drive it (especially with my old camp trailer attached, so walked it, and a first for me at least, an engraved keystone - 1887 indeed. Where this road goes, have no clue, love all these mystery roads

Posted September 5, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Wo!! Love it

Posted September 5, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Possible to change status on this one to "replaced"? Thanks!!

Posted September 5, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Nick, added photo to existing entry. You are Probably right on pin. Not sure of loci.

Posted September 5, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Dana and Kay - Love that old photo thank you for posting. Curious about your pinned location, thinking the Smoky Hill River was the body of water that bridge crossed which is south of your pin, or there was a leg of the River that ran that far north way back late 19th century/earliest 20th century when that bridge was built, just curious, love to go investigate

Posted September 5, 2018, by Larry Hornbaker (larryhornbaker [at] sbcglobal [dot] net)

Kansas & Oklahoma train passing over bridge July, 2009

Posted September 2, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Repeat listing for "Bee Creek Bridge" in same county

Posted September 2, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge might not be as lost as we think. It was reportedly placed on the ground intact nearby. A photograph has surfaced on Facebook showing the bridge sitting on dry land and overgrown with weeds. It might still be hiding in the trees if somebody wants to do a field check.

Posted September 2, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Thanks Tony - glad this little one still standing!!

Posted August 31, 2018, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

First time I've seen a plaque mounted that way! You're a trooper as always Nick!

Posted August 31, 2018, by Matt Lohry

Apparently this road has been closed for only a couple of years...it's amazing how little time it takes for a road to look like it's been abandoned for a century after it closes.

Posted August 30, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Exists!! And very old indeed, closed, with a long boggy walk to her - worth the journey. Neat survivor, great pillars - remote and spooky spot.

Posted August 30, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Aaaargh....plaque date broken off, and funny to even find one on such a tiny bridge, and hung sideways - all firsts, for me at least....absolute mess of a road after a heavy rain, parked 1/2 mile away and walked down muddy road to this little special one, holes rotted all the way through deck, but remains open to traffic

Posted August 29, 2018, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Stupp Bros. style plaque

Posted August 29, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Buddy of mine Taylor Kesl visited Jewell Co. same weekend recently I did and snapped these photos, some great ones, killer plaque, will try to get side and underneath shots if/when I'm way out that way again

Posted August 28, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Some very fine work has been done to this one, proudly shown off now as a major pedestrian walkway and attraction - sign says one of 4 Luten's remaining in KS I believe - love seeing this back (basically) in one piece

Posted August 28, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Believe you're right, Tony !!

Posted August 28, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Cool 106 y.o. queenpost, maybe hard to see in photos but one end is listing considerably to the side, vertical supports underneath leaning noticeably,very good candidate for collapse with heavy load across, very remote area

Posted August 23, 2018, by Luke

Yeah, I'm not opposed to changing names of those that are colloquially referred to as tunnels to say as such, but it should be made abundantly clear that unlike the cut-and-cover construction Royce is arguing against (Despite it typifying said construction style), these aren't considered tunnels on an engineering-level.

Another example of this would be the "Awful Tunnels" in Omaha.

Common nickname amongst drivers, but neither the city nor the railroad engineering department ever considered them tunnels.

Posted August 23, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yes, I have heard the name "Subway" used before. Structures like this seem to be known as tunnels colloquially these days.

Posted August 23, 2018, by Luke

I've seen these sort of overpasses referred to as "subways" on occasion. That nickname (Which is common in Europe) seemed to fall out of favor due to the confusion with subway transit systems.

Some of them are locally referred to as tunnels, like two in Houston, Texas are.

Posted August 23, 2018, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I noticed both this bridge and BNSF-Madison street have a wooden and concrete railing on either side.Why is that?

Posted August 23, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The Tunnel VS. Not Tunnel debate always makes me think of this structure and its twin on Madison.

Posted August 22, 2018, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

From the looks of the concrete there could be 2 more legs exposed soon Nick!

Posted August 22, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The 1941 KDOT county map shows US 50S taking a route through town but it's not clear where it crosses the river. In 1953 the bypass has been built.

Posted August 21, 2018, by Eric Kinkhorst (erick [dot] bud [at] gmail [dot] com)

So I'm guessing this was once HWY 50?

Posted August 21, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hi Sheldon. It is good to have you back on here.

Regarding the older bridge, I suspect that the pony truss might have been brought it to replace a third stone arch span that either collapsed or was found to be unsafe for some reason. It is quite unusual to see a relatively light pony span paired with a sturdy stone arch structure.

If a third arch did collapse, then the county could have installed a pony span very quickly, especially if they had a spare one laying around in the yard.

Posted August 21, 2018, by Sheldon Wiens

Thank you, Luke!

Posted August 21, 2018, by Luke

Stone arch with a pony truss approach.

Posted August 21, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

King?

Posted August 21, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Nick,

Great shots! I'm not as good at Pratt ponies from this era but a bit of a guess as to the builder, based on the railings: I'm guessing Massillon Bridge Co. with a mid 1880s - mid 1890s build date.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted August 21, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

2 exposed legs 😃

Posted August 21, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

And CLOSED to traffic

Posted August 21, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

BEDSTEAD - pretty spot, this one is shaky, though hanging in there

Posted August 20, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Very pretty survivor this one

Posted August 20, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Polygonal Warren....love these monsters

Posted August 20, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Well, I cannot quite claim credit for the term, because I think that James came up with it. Still, it is quite appropriate.

I certainly respect that the landowner does not want the location to be posted publicly. Still, it is great that he saved the bridge from demolition.

Posted August 20, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

This one replaced by UCEB - going to use Robert Elder's catchy word from now on, but by luck, friend told me her brother saved this bridge from the scrapper, and is now on his property not far away (see photo), by request did not want to share new exact location, but I visited yesterday, more likely an 1890-1910 bridge, in agreement with Robert, not a 1924

Posted August 16, 2018, by thanksforinfo

Long live Oliver R.

Posted August 16, 2018, by Larry Hornbaker (larryhornbaker [at] sbcglobal [dot] net)

This bridge is lost. Replaced by a new concrete bridge in 2018.

Posted August 9, 2018, by Anonymous

I recall seeing a photograph of this bridge with its original concrete balustrade railings. The bridge looked beautiful with its original railings. With a nice restoration job, it could look beautiful again.

Posted August 8, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

This one has been replaced

Posted August 8, 2018, by Darryl Hill (dehill22 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I took this video on July 22, 2018 of this bridge.

I put history about the bridge in the video.

https://youtu.be/jfec4FSnbmk

Posted August 7, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Found a group of photos I forgot to post with visit - Feb., 2018. Old beauty, still open then.

Posted August 6, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

KDOT has past county maps online. The 1987 map shows the road crossing the river, in 1998 the symbol for a gate is on either side of the river, and 2010 shows a gate on the west side and the road ends short of the river on the east.

Posted August 6, 2018, by Debbie Geiger (djgeiger [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I was researching this bridge because in 2010, I was following my AAA TripTik to take us from Independence, KS to Mansfield, MO. It took me down 3800 to a road closed sign!

I'm still wondering how AAA got it wrong!

Interesting that I can't find when the bridge disappeared.

Posted August 5, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Looks like this one replaced via sat. images

Posted August 5, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Current satellite imagery as of 7/18 and shadows cast in those images sure make that look like the case, Robert, agree

Posted August 5, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

This one has been replaced

Posted August 4, 2018, by Donald L Wells (wellser2001 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Dad said the bridge was built in 1950/1951

Posted July 24, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Looks like it's been replaced...

..aaargh

Posted July 22, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Beaut !! Fun visit. Both plaques gone now.....grrr....

Posted July 22, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge is one of the most underrated closed spandrel concrete bridges in existence. Before satellite imagery was as good as is now, I had heard rumors of it extending over that island and across the east channel. I was very pleasantly surprised when satellite imagery became good enough to confirm the validity of those rumors.

It is sad that the easternmost span has collapsed but at the same time I'm thrilled that the overwhelming majority the bridge still exists. This is truly a spectacular structure.

If the City of Baxter Springs ever manages to purchase that island, this bridge could be an awesome restoration project if funding were available.

Posted July 22, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Neat one - could use a little TLC with decking, bit dangerous, several visitors while we were there, really neat large property full of historical buildings and other misc. pieces

Posted July 22, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Marshy, creepy, spooky, buggy spot, completely camouflaged from plain view and most satellite imagery

Posted July 22, 2018, by Anonymous

This one an absolute blast to visit, public side access at end of a city block, completely welcoming although should be careful when walking across the river span, as mentioned earlier, run into the famous purple paint "no trespassing" warning, and does in fact continue across marshland and halfway across another creek at other end before looks like a collapse or deconstruction (see satellite image - wow!!)...arch tops visible through platform, so fun, great piece of history, this may be one of the longer examples in existence?- love these bridges

Posted July 13, 2018, by Max

This may be the most recent sections of abandoned trackage in the country. Itís only been out of service since 2012-13ish, when the new intermodal facility was constructed to the north. Previously BNSF had a Main 1 & Main 2 title for the line, being they split off prior to then.

Posted July 12, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hi Priscilla:

Thanks for the update. I figured that this bridge would not be here much longer. Wilson County is now nearly devoid of historic highway bridges.

Posted July 12, 2018, by Priscilla Petersen (priscilla [dot] petersen [at] ks [dot] gov)

This bridge has been replaced.

Posted July 11, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

No problem Nick! I have recently acquired complete bridge records for most ATSF divisions. This also includes most of Kansas. It certainly makes research a lot less hassle.

Posted July 11, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Thanks for filling in const. date and creek info John, couldn't find that in any of my data.

Posted July 10, 2018, by Eric Kinkhorst (erick [dot] bud [at] gmail [dot] com)

Bridgehunter.com

historic and notable bridges of the u.s.

Posted July 10, 2018, by Eric Kinkhorst (erick [dot] bud [at] gmail [dot] com)

Wow

Posted July 7, 2018, by Roger Duroni (Rduroni [at] cableone [dot] net)

I know most of the history of this KG&E power plant property as my father n both of my grandfathers worked here.

Posted July 4, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

my thoughts exactly, Robert, your input is totally worth passing on to museum folks also in my opinion, that 10 year difference is pretty gigantic really....(new plaque time?)....the newspaper article is pretty solid evidence also

Posted July 4, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

very nice !!

Posted July 4, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Perhaps it glows green...

Posted July 4, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

This one's location may be under the lake.

Posted July 3, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

1913 makes much more sense to me than 1923 as a construction date. By 1923, the pin-connected era was over. Even 1913 is rather late for a pin-connected bridge, but this particular structure was built in a rural area where pin-connected technology might have still been in use, albeit on the wane.

This bridge is rather heavily built for such as small bridge. Thus, it probably does date to the latter part of the pin-connected era. Thus, it looks exactly like what I would expect a 1913 pin-connected Pratt pony truss to look like.

Whenever I see a pin-connected truss with a post-1920 construction date, I always assume that the date is either an error, or a relocation/rehabilitation date.

This bridge was obviously narrowed when it was moved to the museum. Although I always prefer to see a bridge maintained at its proper width, the county deserves praise for preserving the most important aspects of this bridge. Such preservation is far preferable to demolition.

Posted July 3, 2018, by Emily Wortman (Emily_Wortman12 [at] outlook [dot] com)

Picture taken September 2015

Posted July 2, 2018, by Luke

This bridge was burned in January, but repaired within a week or so:

http://www.ottawaherald.com/news/20180123/flint-hills-bridge...

And two weeks ago the entire trail was designated as a Kansas State Park:

http://www.ottawaherald.com/news/20180621/flint-hills-trail-...

Hopefully this sets a (positive) precedent in Kansas.

Posted July 2, 2018, by Luke

The following Newspaper.com OCR text for the August 11th, 1913 edition of Burlington, Kansas' Daily Republican mentions "The new Bennett bridge in Ottum", which I assume to be Ottumwa Township.

https://www.newspapers.com/newspage/124504913/

Posted July 2, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Thanks for making the journey Nick.

Posted July 2, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

1923 !! Bennett Bridge !! From Coffey County !! Built by KC Bridge Co. !! Donated mid-90's, young staff had no idea where it was originally placed, or if that was the same year it was disassembled from unknown spot...I imagine someone here knows it's original location....neat old 5hing

Posted July 2, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Visited Coffey Co. Museum today, honestly one of the better County museums in Kansas, room after room, amazing....but the bridge....

Posted July 2, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Visited today. Correct photos, correct bridge this time - a monster

Posted July 1, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

new (but couple years old) photos correctly posted here that were mistakenly uploaded first onto BNSF Cottonwood River bridge page (also Lyon County, KS)

Posted July 1, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

ok, Finally fixing this, transferring all photos and info to BNSF Neosho Rapids bridge page

Posted June 30, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

thanks, Tony !!

Posted June 30, 2018, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The abutments are the real prize here. My guess is that they once supported a pre-1900 metal or wooden truss of some sort.

Great find Nick... As always!

Posted June 29, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

There is only one 149' Through Truss on the ATSF system in 1916 that was replaced prior to 1925, indicating that this truss likely came from that location. Original location is believed to be near Suwanee, NM.

Posted June 26, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Well, that branch came and went quickly. I found a map showing the crossing and based on your evidence I'll add the bridge and put it as related.

https://prd-tnm.s3.amazonaws.com/StagedProducts/Maps/Histori...

Posted June 26, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Clark,

I have attached the information I used to find the original location of this bridge. This is the only truss that matches the given dimensions and year (100' built in 1907) on the entire system, despite being labeled a through truss. It also appears to be one of, if not the only pony truss on the ATSF system. If you look east of US-50, near where the levee curves, you can clearly see piers for a four span bridge. I believe this branch line was abandoned in the late 1930s, and according to:

https://www.labellemodels.com/manuals/Atchison,%20Topeka%20&...

was built between 1906 and 1908 as a short connecting route.