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Posted August 20, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

That's him in photo #6.

Posted August 20, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Thought it to be so, considered both Warren and Pratt classification listings, thing is a beast over an otherwise non-beastly creek. Great dog - he loved his cat-walk.....or dog-walk.

Posted August 20, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks to the thoughtful landowners, there is one remaining highway truss bridge left in Douglas County, Kansas. I had thought they were all gone.

To the best of my knowledge, this leaves Linn County as the only county in the eastern third of Kansas without a single highway truss bridge. Linn County does have a railroad truss and a marsh Arch so all is not lost there.

This bridge is also a very unusual hybrid of a Warren and Pratt truss. I knew of two other examples in Kansas but both of them have been demolished. The discovery of this bridge has resurrected some history!

Posted August 19, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks for trudging out there. It looked pretty neat from aerial imagery.

Posted August 19, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Bit disappointing, slightly similar to this one in Wyandotte Co., this is no more than a pipe-hanger bridge https://bridgehunter.com/ks/wyandotte/bh45080/ . Although there are signs of a timber bridge being in this spot at one time, currently there is only the pipe/garbage dam. Possible there is a low-water paved crossing under the muck which may have been visible at one time via satellite

Posted August 18, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

John - little late on this reply - parked in cul-de-sac to the NE, and walked through open lands to SW until I came to it, basically followed the creek

Posted August 12, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

All the way to Augusta? Awesome! I imagine that it could connect to the Redbud Trail coming out of Wichita, assuming that they can get a bridge in place over the Whitewater River. (Not a MOB, I pray).

The original RR bridge over the Whitewater River at Augusta(plate girder) had to be removed because the Whitewater River was undermining it.

Posted August 12, 2017, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge is scheduled to become a part of the Western Sky Trail, a short 18-mile long Rail-Trail between Fredonia and Chanute. The trail is still in the planning phase.

Posted August 12, 2017, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge, and the line from Fredonia to Augusta is scheduled to become part of the "Iron Horse Trail", which is in the planning phase.

Posted August 9, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Cor-Ten still lives on.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/28/nyregion/building-with-wea...

If fabricated with its limitations in mind it works. But it has quite a record of failure, including Atlanta's Omni.

http://www.nytimes.com/1991/08/22/arts/sculptor-s-ordeal-wit...

Posted August 9, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

In all seriousness, it is going to be interesting to see what happens with respect to the condition of the steel on these bridges over the next few decades. Many of these bridges are composed of the so-called weathering steel. This weathering steel is intended to develop a patina of rust and then quit rusting. If I recall correctly, I believe that the infamous Omni Coliseum in Atlanta, Georgia was built from a similar material but it could not stand up to the humid Georgia climate.

Eastern Kansas does not have Gulf Coast humidity but it's not exactly a dry climate either. This bridge is going to have to sit out in the rather humid environment of Eastern Kansas. In forty or fifty years we can see how well it will have performed.

We can see how some of the Victorian era wrought iron bridges have performed across Kansas and the rest of the country. There are some 1870s and 1880s bridges out there that are not doing so bad as far as the condition of the iron is concerned. On the other hand there are much newer bridges in the region which are deteriorating rapidly due to moisture and salt. This bridge will have a chance to prove itself... how will it fare?

Posted August 9, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Me too Nathan!

Posted August 9, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Epic Failure. Gonna need a...

Posted August 9, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Not a Bowstring Nick... Just a "Welded Wannabe"! (Somewhere in the unknown region between a Pratt and a Parker.

I've said it a million times... I can handle these MOB's when they are used in new construction or replacing non-historic spans. But when an historic truss is sacrificed and the public is led to believe that it is a good thing... It's not! Even the rust on them comes off as fake to me as it tries to imply that they are "historic looking". I think they would actually look better with a bright coat of paint on them, but I know the manufacturers tout them as no paint needed. I won't be around for it but I'll be surprised if they last 50 years.

My Rant for the evening.

Posted August 9, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Up until about 40 years ago, Douglas County had a nice collection of early 20th century trusses. Now they are no more.

If you are a resident of Douglas County and you want to see some nice truss bridges, may I suggest Miami County...

Posted August 9, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Had not previously noticed that old listing for whatever reason....wreason....wow that old thru truss a beauty!! sad sad sad

Posted August 9, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Here is the former bridge:

http://bridgehunter.com/ks/douglas/231035004560/

It was the last remaining historic truss bridge in Douglas County save for the railroad bridge at Eudora. With the demolition of the old bridge, Douglas County became the first county in the eastern third of Kansas (roughly), without a single vehicular metal truss or Marsh arch within its boundaries. I would not be surprised if one or two other Counties have joined Douglas County since then.

Posted August 9, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Fun modern bridge I found on satellite this week, a hearty bridge with nice wood planking over Washington Creek just east of the town of Lone Star, Kansas.

Posted August 8, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Yep... Looks RR to me as well!

Posted August 8, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

That has been my suspicion. Rail to road.

Posted August 8, 2017, by Luke

Historicaerials shows this bridge in 1958 as a spur of the St. Louis-San Fransisco Railroad, but later as a road bridge.

Posted August 8, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

If I recall correctly, this bridge used to have a pigtail ramp on the East end. Of course, I was never able to get very close to it so I might be misremembering. If I am correct about the pigtail ramp, then that would certainly indicate vehicle use.

Posted August 8, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

That's what I was looking for, Nathan. I saw several references to the Neosho power plant but couldn't figure out if it was by the river or the town of Neosho. Good old Parsons Sun.

Gas generators make sense considering the large amount of gas in the ground around here. This raises the question of why they needed a rail bridge if not to move coal. They ran a rail line to the original plant site but putting up a bridge just to build on the other side of the river seems like a lot of expense. The people I knew who might remember are long gone.

Posted August 8, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Not sure if I am missing something obvious in this conversation, but it appears that in 2012 a power plant called the Neosho Steam Electric Station was removed off Wallace Road south of US-400 along the Neosho River... that would appear to reference a location near this bridge. Is that was everyone is wondering about?

http://www.parsonssun.com/news/article_c80f2063-7ac6-597a-9b...

The recently demolished plant was newer than the bridge; likely if the bridge is associated with the power plants it was the 1930s ones:

Westar Energy decided last year that to be more efficient, the plant, on which construction began in 1953 and operations began in 1954, would no longer be used to generate electricity.

Like the two other gas-powered steam electric stations built on the east side of the Neosho River in the 1930s, and later razed, the newer station on the west side of the river has been decommissioned.

Posted August 8, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

This appears to have been the site of a power plant, located between the lake and the river. I don't see any trace of it now other than some disturbed ground. It's hard to find info on what was here, what became of it, or even a name.

Guessing, KS added a lot of generating capacity in the 1920s and closed down a number of older plants over the last 30 years as utility companies consolidated. From the air currently it looks like switching gear in the enclosures.

Posted August 6, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I have really been a bit intrigued by this bridge ever since I first discovered it.

It has been my experience that bridges that are old enough to have cruciform outriggers, are usually old enough to have built-up verticals as opposed to the simple rolled verticals on this bridge. Cruciform outriggers generally fell out of favor in the 1880s, but rolled member were still relatively rare at that time. The rolled members make me think that the bridge was built after 1890, but the cruciform outriggers would make me think that it was built before 1890.

In addition, as Nathan has pointed out, this bridge has cast iron bearing shoes which are also indicative of a very old bridge.

This bridge has so many unusual and non-standard features that it is clearly of high historic significance even if it was built closer to 1900 then to 1870. As far as I'm concerned it should receive a very high priority for preservation. It is a very unusual, if not unique structure.

Nick found a bridge in neighboring Jefferson County that also has cruciform outriggers:

http://bridgehunter.com/ks/jefferson/cedar-creek/

The Jefferson County example looks more much like an 1870s bridge to me based on the fact that it is extremely lightweight.

Posted August 6, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Now that the plant has closed, I wonder if the bridge could be in danger of demolition. Thankfully, the Neosho River is not considered navigable, so keeping the river free of pylons is less critical from the Federal Government point of view.

Posted August 6, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The 2007 county highway map shows it present but closed.

Posted August 6, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

...And yes Robert, the substructure is suggestive of a relocation job. Was likely on a main road somewhere in the county and was recycled for a lesser crossing.

Posted August 6, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Kansas Army Ammunition Plant, opened 1942, closed 2005.

http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/facility/aap-kansas.h...

HAER does not mention a power generating facility associated with the plant.

https://cdn.loc.gov/master/pnp/habshaer/ks/ks0000/ks0074/dat...

Posted August 6, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I agree with Juls... I think that 1900 would be incorrect, and even 1890 might be pushing it a bit!

Posted August 6, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Julie, good thoughts. I am confident enough that this bridge is pre 1900 that I went ahead and changed the date as you suggested. I haven't checked county records but it's possible this bridge might have been moved here or rehabilitated in 1907 although I don't know that for certain.

Posted August 6, 2017, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Piping in, I would put a date of 1890 so that folks don't think it is turn of the century. Utilizing materials. We've seen other Missouri, Kansas companies be frugal. Agree with Nathan pre 1900.

We pushed our bowstring, McIntyre to having been put together with materials to 1878 when King started to use angle instead of cruciform even though it was sold and erected in 1883.

There's a timeline building....)

Posted August 4, 2017, by Anonymous

Pin moved to the location listed in the Kansas NBI. The truss bridge was replaced with this concrete slab in 2003. I did not correct the other details which correspond to the pre 2000 NBI data.

Posted August 4, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Giant open field at this current pinned location - no bridge, former or current, in sight.

Posted August 4, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Giant open field at this current pinned location - no bridge, former or current, in sight.

Posted August 3, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

I see that I made an error back in December in my description of this bridge.... it is in fact on Y Road

Posted August 3, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

This is the same bridge listed as "Eight Mile Creek Bridge" on Cowley County, Kansas page - one of the listings should be deleted to avoid confusion.

Posted August 1, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

If you look closely, it appears that there is a plaque on the OUTSIDE of the top chord on this one. That seems a bit odd.

Posted August 1, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hats off to whomever created the Cruciform Outriggers category. Good call!

Posted August 1, 2017, by Kevin Skow (weatherbum [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Thanks for the kind words! I actually managed to stay dry for this shot since there is a small outcrop of rocks there that I could balance on. It was almost like a storybook setting with the pool of water under the bridge with no ripples at all in it with a waterfall nearby. Definitely a diamond in the rough!

Posted August 1, 2017, by Anonymous

Othmar H. Ammann nominations coming soon, certainly is a great Photo

Posted August 1, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Photo of the year?

Posted August 1, 2017, by K. Allen Ballard (speedeeprint [at] gmail [dot] com)

Pic #3 of 11 is just Fab! Great shot! It looks like you got your feet wet taking the shot? GREAT Work! You might want to enlarge & enter this in a photo contest.

Posted August 1, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Tony:

I have often thought that it looked a bit like a Western Bridge Co. plaque.

I have never been able to confirm any Stupp Brothers bridges in Kansas but I would not be too surprised if they built a few. They were working just across the state line in Missouri so it is conceivable that they might have wanted to expand their area of operations in to Kansas. I just don't know if they actually did or not.

Posted July 31, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Doesn't that kinda look like a Stupp Bros. or Western Plaque Robert!

Posted July 31, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

See KHRI PDF for image. This bridge appears to have been replaced with a low water crossing.

Thankfully, neighboring Butler County has preserved, or at least spared, two Kansas City Bridge & Iron Pratt trusses.

Posted July 31, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks for doing a field visit.

Posted July 31, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

No, I didn't see any in the area, this one is still very much open, maybe a little bit more time left than expected .....

Posted July 31, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Any sign of new bridge construction? This one probably does not have much time left.

Posted July 31, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Sadly, Tony is probably right. Hopefully they are safe somewhere.

Posted July 31, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The plaques are likely missing now Nick. I see in pic #2 where one was on this end, not sure about the other side.

Posted July 31, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Wow....this one is quite a statement, really beautiful, little bit tricky to get to, fantastic elevation over calm River

Posted July 30, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yes, KSHS found a plaque with the builder, and the date (1878).

Posted July 30, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

totally agree.....pontists gotta pont though, right? haha...

Posted July 30, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Dang!! There's a plaque on it? Not sure how I missed that the 1st time. Just means I have to go back. Yes !!!

Posted July 30, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yes, an absolute must save! Pin-connected Warren trusses are rare in general, but this one has some very unusual features, making it even more significant.

As far as I am concerned, every 1870s truss is Nationally significant.

Posted July 30, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I agree with the comments made by Nathan, Nick, and Tony. This one needs to be preserved, whether in place or in a park.

This bridge might be the only one of its kind anywhere in the United States and beyond.

Montgomery County has an incredible collection of historic bridges, and is a great Bridgehunter destination.

Posted July 30, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

A "MUST" save bridge!

Posted July 30, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This is one that needs to be put at the top of the save list!

Looks like there are some parks in Coffeyville that it could be relocated to, it would be a shame to see it saved from demolition only to fall to neglect and Mother Nature!

Posted July 30, 2017, by John Marvig

I would agree with Robert. Winter is my preference, even if it is horribly cold. There's something better about photos with snow on the ground and a crystal blue sky.

Posted July 30, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This thing really is overgrown. I have to admit I do like bridge hunting in the winter if there's not too much snow on the ground. At least in Kansas, you can see our overgrown bridges in the winter.

This bridge really illustrates why I have been so concerned about the condition of our bridges in Kansas. The greenery growing on this bridge makes for some cool photographs but plants and trees can really put a bridge in danger.

Posted July 30, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

It is good to have some recent photos on here. This bridge is on the national register of historic places and is hopefully safe from demolition. That being said, it is not safe from destruction by nature. The trees growing on and around this bridge are going to become a threat someday. This thing won't stand forever without maintenance.

Posted July 30, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I am glad to see that this one is still standing. I had originally thought that it was probably lost but here it is.

Posted July 30, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Somehow this old bridge is still holding on even after being abandoned for decades. This one would be a great candidate for preservation on a trail somewhere in the area.

Posted July 30, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Another great find! There have been some nice bedsteads surfacing lately.

Posted July 30, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The plaques on this bridge are really awesome! You don't normally find great plaques like this on riveted 1930s pony trusses.

Although 1930s riveted Pony trusses are less significant than 1870s bowstrings it certainly makes sense to preserve a few of the best examples. I would say that this one with its plaques is definitely one of the best examples in the area.

Posted July 30, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yes, the Kill Creek Crossing does make sense as a potential former location of this bridge. It makes even more sense when you consider the mismatched spans that are currently crossing Kill Creek.

Posted July 30, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is definitely a beautiful little bridge! We now have confirmation that it does in fact have cruciform outriggers. This is a very significant span despite its small size. Cruciform outriggers are a rare find today.

This bridge would be a prime candidate for preservation if it ever needs to be replaced.

Posted July 30, 2017, by Kevin Skow (weatherbum [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Got here just as the sunlight was starting to fade, but it made for a great shot. Another fun one to explore when the fall colors are out!

Posted July 30, 2017, by Kevin Skow (weatherbum [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Still a beauty in the trees. Will be fun to get some shots in the fall or winter with this one!

Posted July 30, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

A small Warren pony that has been transformed into a trellis!

Posted July 30, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Camelback style (5-slope) Polygonal Warren pony truss.Very long and very cool!

As always... Good detective work Nick!

Posted July 30, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This is a beauty! Yes, I would say that those abutments are either original to this span or from an earlier one! The lightweight construction and design of the outriggers would suggest an 1880-1890 build date.

Thanks for the great pics Kevin!

Posted July 30, 2017, by Kevin Skow (weatherbum [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Beautiful day to look at this bridge. The stone piers look to be original, and combined with the beautiful, placid pools of the stream below the bridge, made this a great one to photograph.

Posted July 30, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

hmmm...true Warren?.....

Posted July 30, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

this sucker is loooooong, with one approach precariously hanging in the air and it's abutment several yards in the distance

Posted July 30, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

WARREN PONY ...this one was fun to get to, great elevation off low-water creek, photogenic little spot....save it!!!

Posted July 30, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Cool little bedstead on stilts, barely hanging on, very pretty spot, so many cool little bridges here around Liberty, KS

Posted July 30, 2017, by John Marvig

Nick and Robert,

I had assumed that this bridge was relocated from Kill Creek, also in the town of De Soto. There are parallel tracks with an identical length through girder built a year later from the pony truss, as well as a "frankenbridge" of girders built in 1940.

Posted July 30, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Only reason I posted these photos is because thought there was a good chance they used the supports and original guts of old pony bridge that was removed

Posted July 30, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

reason #57 that a damp, hot summer is not the best time to go looking for bridges....it's a closed little pony nearly indiscernible in the tall weeds, glad to have found it and know that it still exists but could barely be viewed at all in early July

Posted July 30, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

ol beauty !!

Posted July 30, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Visited last week...unbelievably overgrown, had my share of ticks, chiggers and poison ivy that long bridgehunt weekend so didn't climb flimsy weed tree to get current shot of plaque, all but hidden from view otherwise. Otherwise, felt honored to be in the presence of such a unique and historic bridge. All things considered seems to be pretty solid...great one

Posted July 30, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Railroads were notorious for moving bridges around. I would not be at all surprised if this bridge was built somewhere else in 1907 and moved to this location sometime around the construction of the Sunflower Army Ammunition Plant. It looks like a circa 1907 bridge to me.

Posted July 29, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

plaque clearly indicates that at least the CONSTRUCTION of this bridge (not PLACEMENT) was 1907, 2nd posting really of this plaque info

Posted July 29, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I was hoping to return to this bridge and photograph it in more detail before it got destroyed. Apparently no such luck. Thanks for letting us know about this, that way I don't make an unnecessary trip down the road.

Posted July 29, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Well that is a shame. Stone Arch Bridges in this area are usually safe from demolition but apparently this one was not saved. I was hoping to visit it at some point.

Posted July 29, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Mr. Learned:

Thanks for posting that. I enjoyed reading the article. I am hoping that this bridge will be preserved. This is one of the few massive member riveted bridges in the area. I would come nearer expecting to see something like this in Oklahoma.

Posted July 29, 2017, by Gary Learned (glearned [at] msn [dot] com)

According to the attached clipping from the Arkansas City Daily Traveler, the E Chestnut bridge was constructed starting in early 1929, officially opening February 8th, 1930.

Posted July 29, 2017, by Ron Reber

Bridge no longer exists, has been replaced.

Posted July 29, 2017, by Ron Reber

Well they did not have an attack of common sense. Bridge has been totally done away with not a trace of it and replaced with a new bridge.

Posted July 29, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I can't wait to see pictures. Nice plaques always add to the significance.

Pumpkin Creek also has one or two closed spandrel concrete arch bridges. The Labette County listings in this site are a real mess, mostly due to NBI Coordinates, so I am trying to sort them out.

Posted July 28, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Wow, this one is stout. Great plaques...pretty road, remote but busy traffic

Posted July 28, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Also just a hint of what might have been an abutment on the west-side of the Creek under a tree

Posted July 28, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Was very much looking forward to seeing an 1886 open pony truss bridge .... no such luck - looks like it was replaced long ago, walked the bank of the creek about a 100 yd south just to make sure, would have been neat to see in the day

Posted July 27, 2017, by Zachary S

That's true about the exhibit feature, it's exactly the kind of thing I'm talking about and I do use it when my browser is being kind, haha. It's definitely possible to even do an aerial bridge hunt from there even if it's more difficult than on a standalone like Google Earth. But it's great for planning out places to visit for a bridge hunting expedition.

I've covered AL mostly but anywhere from MD and KY south and MS east, I've got on Google Earth and occasionally play around with. I've noticed aerial imagery seems to be updated more frequently on the east coast and east of the Mississippi in general. The foliage density definitely makes winter views a must though!

Posted July 27, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yes, and exceptionally rare. I had looked at aerial imagery of this bridge and to be honest I thought it looked like a through truss. Of course, I thought my eyes were just playing tricks on me as this thing is only 62 ft long. I guess I should have trusted my eyes.

Posted July 27, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

4-panel Pratt's are really cool!

Posted July 27, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Sometimes one just misses it. I have narrowly missed a few by a matter of weeks.