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Posted October 22, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Love to know the exact story on this little nicely-packaged piece of history - found at yard sale, yesterday (!!!) - some sort of local Pottawatomie Co. KS fundraising event after the bridge's dismantling in 1990? Ha - love this thing

Posted October 21, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Great find! Too bad it is long gone...

Posted October 21, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

It is good to see a photograph of the plaque here. This is one of the oldest remaining Marsh Arch bridges in Kansas.

Posted October 19, 2017, by Joe (jw72184 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I know the owners of the property surrounding it, they would prefer no one trespass on their land, however if one is willing to paddle up from the Eudora boat docks it is quite easy to get to. The cross under the bridge was a pet.

Posted October 19, 2017, by Ron Reber (ronreber [at] yahoo [dot] com)

It looks like this may have been a Tee Beam, there are uprights in the creek bed and along the bridge rail there are rebar where the uprights would have been. It had a pipe railing along the top as the pipe is still connected to the uprights.

Posted October 17, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

That is good news all around. Hopefully Generation Z has an appreciation for historic bridges.

Posted October 17, 2017, by David Larson (dvdclrsn [at] gmail [dot] com)

It looks like some work has been done fairly recently to stabilize this structure. Interestingly, one of the most skilled stone masons in the area lives just a few yards from here and takes care to keep the area cleaned up. I'm informed that people come here for senior pictures, etc.

Posted October 17, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is an interesting little foot bridge. It looks to me as though the deck has a little bit of a camber.

Posted October 17, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is a great find and I am glad to see some photos on here. A similar bridge in Rush County, which was on the national register of historic places, was demolished a few years ago. It is good to see that this one is still standing so far. Hopefully it will be retained. I would I think that this bridge has a high chance of being found historic given its unusual design.

Posted October 17, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This one's a Beauty!

Posted October 17, 2017, by David Larson

I posted those to the wrong bridge's page. I've moved a couple of them to the right place. I'll try to upload a few more later.

Posted October 16, 2017, by David Larson (dvdclrsn [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thank you, Robert. I'm hoping to come back when there is a train crossing the bridge early in the morning. This may be a challenge as trains just run a few times per week and I live about 45 miles from here.

Posted October 15, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge has a bizarre story to say the least. It carried traffic on Monument Road for several years. I don't know if that was its original location or not. It was still on Monument Road when I last visited it. In fact, it was still open to traffic.

Perhaps the most bizarre thing about this bridge is the fact that it was put together from random parts of an even older bridge. I would not be too surprised if the parts that compose this bridge originally came from more than one older bridge. This bridge might even comprised parts of three or four older bridges.

It is a Waddell truss in terms of overall layout but it was not built by the same firm that built the one in Missouri. Most likely, a creative County engineer designed this thing and a crew of County workers assembled it. Doniphan county has at least two other bridges that were altered and reused.

Posted October 14, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Thanks, Dana and Kay

Posted October 14, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Nick you rock dude! Nice find

Posted October 14, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Searched for other listings of this historic (albeit modified) bridge on this site, but did not find any, hence this listing. Spotted from the road as I was driving by, great old thing, very happy locals had the thought to rehab it and make it very accessible to the public.

Posted October 14, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Another one of the odd paired angle Pony trusses in this region. This one happens to be in Queenpost form.

Posted October 14, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Well, that is too bad. I knew that it was doomed because of the KHRI update.

Posted October 14, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

This is a beauty - beaten up, but still going strong(ish)

Posted October 14, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

2017 - this old beauty has been replaced with something QUITE less interesting.

Posted October 14, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

1875 !!

Posted October 14, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Wow. 1st visit. Little thing is really neat, perfect spot for it in this city park.

Posted October 14, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

just saw listing for wood bridge - "Oxide Rd. plank bridge"

Posted October 14, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

the 3rd crossing and northernmost creek crossing on Oxide Rd.

Posted October 14, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

the second crossing of the creek over Oxide Rd.

Posted October 14, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Bridge is lost. As you proceed north up Oxide Rd., the road crosses the creek a total of 3 times, the southmost where the pin is currently located is now a low-water crossing, the next one north is a wooden bridge, and the last one northmost is another low water crossing

Posted October 14, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

new(ish) coat of paint? like how it stands out - was not searching for it but it jumped right out while driving by today

Posted October 10, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Well, that is too bad. If anybody wants to venture out to North Central Kansas, some of the remaining pony trusses out there are probably well worth a visit.

Unfortunately, many Kansas counties have been destroying their pony trusses at a very rapid rate in the last few years. Many of those pony trusses were very old and some of them had at least moderately high National significance. A few might have even had very high National significance.

Some of these pony trusses are so small that they would be extremely easy and relatively inexpensive to relocate to hiking trails in the area. If a trail needs a small bridge why not use a local historic pony truss instead of a MOB?

Posted October 9, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

This one is a goner - via satellite clearly see the abutments that used to hold the missing bridge

Posted October 9, 2017, by Ron Reber (ronreber [at] yahoo [dot] com)

We were here 10-8-17 bridge has been replaced with huge tinhorn.

Posted October 6, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Kansas lost a Bedstead that way...

http://bridgehunter.com/ks/neosho/671047006409/

Posted October 6, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

They appear to be wrought iron tubes, similar to what you might have seen on the overhead bracing on a King Bowstring.

Posted October 6, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Tell me about it!

Indiana lost it's only WIBCo. tubular bowstring to a tree several years ago!!

http://bridgehunter.com/in/miami/5200039/

Posted October 6, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I'm with you on this one Robert, I'm not convinced they are original but if they were added I think it was a long time ago. If this and the other little bowstring nearby both came from a large multi-span bridge then perhaps they were added when moved.

Posted October 6, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Awesome! Hopefully before a tree falls on it! I have seen a tree crush a bridge one too many times...

Posted October 6, 2017, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge is included in Fort Scott Bourbon County Riverfront Authority planning for trails in the future. Long Shoals is part of the whole plan out to Bid in December. The King Rr bridge a as also evaluated by us 6 years ago.

Posted October 6, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

... or at least I think they are original. The plates on the top chord do give me some pause though...

If these unusual vertical members are a later addition, then they were obviously added relatively early in the bridge's history.

Posted October 5, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Just restarting a discussion... or more specifically just solving a mystery surrounding the vertical rods...

I recently visited the Belleville bowstring Bridge, which is located a few miles north of this one. The Belleville bridge is identical to this one and was probably a part of the same multi span Bowstring over the Republican River at Concordia.

The Belleville Bridge has those same vertical members. They are fixed to the top chord via a cast-iron assembly. Thus, they are very clearly original to the bridge. I do not see any evidence of them being a later addition.

Posted October 5, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

It looks like there might be a tributary of Cox Creek just to the east of the pony truss.

I am glad that other people think there is a pony truss on this road. It is good to know that it is not just my imagination.

Thus far, I cannot find the bridge in the KHRI. Crawford County had a nice collection of traditionally composed pin-connected Pratt pony trusses Plus a Bowstring pony.

The Bowstring, along with one or two of the Pratt ponies, still remain. I am not sure what we have at this location however. I would guess probably a Pratt pony but I don't know that for sure.

Posted October 5, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Looking at the satellite view, it's obvious that Cox Creek is indeed much wider than what this tiny concrete ugly could handle. I agree with Don that this is likely over a small branch or tributary.

Pony truss apparently either well concealed or MIA!

Posted October 5, 2017, by Don Morrison

I'd have to travel 400 miles to this one,so camera in the sky is my only viable option.

All the Cox Creek bridges listed in the NBI are significantly larger than the culvert in the photo. That means that either the photo must be over a tributary of Cox Creek or other small stream, or the county likes to build 100 foot plus bridges over Cox creek, except for this one. lol

Sorry, I just don't think we've got the right bridge picture here.

You've heard of "picture or it didn't happen"?

The picture shows that it did happen, but got EXIF data?

;-)

Posted October 3, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yes, I remember that other bridge getting replaced. That was a bad deal from a preservation standpoint. For those who don't remember, a hiking trail briefly reused a historic pony truss but then the pony truss was demolished and replaced with a MOB.

Hopefully Johnson County will make a better decision this time around and maintain the historic bridge if this old roadbed should become a trail at some point.

Posted October 3, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

As residential neighborhoods move south toward this area, there may be some interest in rehabbing into a park/trail feature. Johnson County certainly has the money but they tore out a nice pony and replaced it with a MOB here:

http://bridgehunter.com/ks/johnson/515450460000001

so they may not have anyone advocating for saving the old ones.

Posted October 3, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Feet on the ground usually beats camera in the air. From the looks of the concrete fence post it's not a new replacement. So we're back to figuring out what the NBI is talking about.

Posted October 3, 2017, by Don Morrison

Agree with Robert here.

What I'm seeing looks like a pony in google earth 2013 view, which is much clearer than the 10/2017 view.

using earth's ruler, it looks to be around 58 feet long and Cox Creek looks to be about 20 feet wide at it's narrowest point.

The picture looks like a culvert over a much smaller maybe seasonal stream.

Posted October 2, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

...and the award for most overgrown bridge in America goes to...

Posted October 2, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

WOW! (there I said it). Nick got some stunning photos of this beauty! Great fieldwork! I wish I could have been there.

Believe it or not, I have never seen this bridge in person.

Posted October 2, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Weird... it sure looks like a pony truss in satellite imagery.

I am well familiar with Elvis Bridges...

Do you suppose that we have an Elvis impersonator here...? Ie, a concrete culvert that looks like a pony truss from the air.

Posted October 2, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Re-visit, posted new pics with friends only to get better perspective of the grand size of this beauty. GI-GANTIC,and great elevation.

Posted October 2, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Clark, I'm not seeing the pony you spoke of visible in a satellite image, this is the 2nd time I visited this weekend and I posted a photo of what is at the current pinned location - Private property, received permission, concrete creek bridge, not a pony.....thoughts?

Posted October 2, 2017, by Sheldon Wiens (sheldon_wiens77 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

You're welcome!☺

Posted October 1, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

No road or bridge on the 1957 quad, so probably relocated by private party.

Posted October 1, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hi Sheldon. Thank you for uploading your photo on here. This is a great little pony truss.

Posted October 1, 2017, by Sheldon Wiens (sheldon_wiens77 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The man who owns this property is a distant relative of mine. I came by this place on my way to deliver feed for his cattle which was right across the creek in a corral on the side of 80th St. Before I crossed the bridge on 80th St., I pulled into his pasture here where I was surprised to see this bridge. I didn't have time to take a whole bunch of photos because I had to get to work with the feed. I only had time to take one photo.

Posted October 1, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I think we have all arrived at a bridge late in the evening. Sometimes we have to do the best that we can especially if it's one of those after work trips.

Thankfully, we now have some photos of the underside of this bridge. These photos confirm that this is in fact a concrete through girder.

When I was living in Kansas I figured these bridges were probably very common all over the country. I have come to find out that they're not really as common as one might think. They certainly have some historical significance even if they don't quite rival the Marsh arches and trusses in the area.

Posted October 1, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yes, I would agree with that. I was hoping he would start contributing here again.

Posted October 1, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Nice to see Sheldon active again.

Posted October 1, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Certainly not ideal photos, got there just as the sun went down and way too many critters and large things moving around in the brush for me to dive in deeper but took the best photos I could of the underbelly of this thing and on top, very interesting indeed not sure it could be any more hearty, thick old thing, massive amounts of concrete, want to return soon in daylight

Posted September 30, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Looks like I will need to do some research on this. I really hope that this bridge is scheduled for repair and not demolition. It is listed on the national register of historic places which does give it some limited protection.

This bridge has been in serious danger of collapse for a while. Although the stone abutments can give way, another real threat to historic bridges is falling trees. Thus, I am glad to see the trees being cleared away from this bridge.

Crawford County has very few historic bridges remaining, especially when compared to Bourbon County to the north. Thus, this bridge is highly significant at the county level. As a bowstring, it has National significance. This bridge would be significant even in a county that was packed with historic bridges.

I have never visited this bridge. It is in a rather remote location. I am glad that Nick ventured out here and documented it for us.

Posted September 30, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Gigantic pile of brush cleared out all around this little bridge which is easily accessible now, bypassed many many years ago just to the left of it by a low water crossing. Possible preservation project going on here ? would love to know if someone knows about this....picture of plaque on outside of bridge now in photos, pat. year date broken off!!

Posted September 30, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hats off to Sheldon for checking on this. It looks like a ca. 1890 - 1910 Pratt pony truss to me. It might even be wrought iron.

Posted September 24, 2017, by Aaron Hall (ahall [at] vitaphone [dot] net)

I drove through here today and found a "Bridge Closed" sign and the road leading to the bridge is being overgrown. I'm sorry I don't have a better picture for documentation but I didn't notice that the bridge was still listed as fully open until I got home.

Posted September 24, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

It looks like the portal bracings on this bridge are starting to become visible for the winter. It will be so nice to see this bridge in Fort Scott where the portal bracings will be restored and visible year-round.

Posted September 20, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yes, I would agree. This bridge, along with the Coffeyville Bridge in Montgomery County should be absolute locks for NRHP listing.

Posted September 20, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This one is a no-brainer given how the town has embraced this beauty with the park and landscaping.

Looks like a great setting!

Posted September 20, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I understand that the Kansas State Historical Society did another visit to this bridge yesterday, September 19th, 2017.

I do not know if it will eventually be nominated for a NRHP listing or not. In my humble opinion, I think that all remaining Marsh arch bridges nationwide should be listed, but that is just my personal opinion...

Posted September 19, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nice shot, David!

Posted September 18, 2017, by David Larson (dvdclrsn [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge has been replaced.

Posted September 15, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

That new Streetview really shows the condition of the area around this bridge. A nationally significant bridge remains in danger...

Posted September 15, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

aah no worries, Dana and Kay !!

Posted September 14, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Whoops! Sorry Nick jumped in on street view , was following Roberts 2009 trial at same time you were. Sorry

Posted September 14, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I am pleasantly surprised to see that this bridge is still in place. Usually when the bridge has not had an inspection since 1991 it is not necessarily a good sign.

This one is definitely older than 1930. Try circa 1900. I suspect that the date of 1930 probably refers to when the concrete pylons were poured.

Nice find!

Posted September 14, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Wow, this one - road closed to west, road and bridge absolutely not open to auto traffic,long long long walk down deserted road to east between fence lines to this one. Special little bridge.

Posted September 14, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Well, that is a shame. It might explain the mass removal of truss bridges all across the county in the last few years.

Posted September 14, 2017, by Jim Hennigan (jhennigan101 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The county showed up unannounced and removed bridge. Same person owns land on both sides of creek, now has to drive four miles around to farm other side.

Posted September 12, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Whoop....wrong photo, removing that one, Clark....6 bridges yesterday, slowly sorting, posting....thanks

Posted September 12, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

met several locals crossing this 87 y.o. beauty - they all seemed very proud of this bridge, old stories about playing in creek on long stretches of beautiful flat rocks

Posted September 12, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

She's a goner.

Posted September 12, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Very close to Caney Bridge, very pretty drive through this area east to west, and desolate...so very few people and no traffic.

Posted September 12, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

No evidence of new bridge construction that I saw. Little towns of Hewins and Osro next door to east all but dried up, sad, but pretty area.

Posted September 11, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

It has been years since I have crossed this bridge so I'm really glad to see that it's still in place. Did you see any evidence of new bridge construction?

If Chautauqua County wanted to build a new bridge, it would be very easy to bypass this bridge to the south. Chautauqua County has lost several historic bridges over the last couple decades, but this one should be a good candidate for preservation as it is in such a rural area and on a rather scenic drive to boot.

Posted September 11, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nathan:

Good thought concerning the similar bridges in Oklahoma. The only major difference I can see is this one has every panel countered whereas the Oklahoma examples do not seem to have those extra counters. The lacing on the verticals varies a bit between the trusses as well. Otherwise, the bridges are certainly very similar. The idea that a truss could have been moved across the state line seems quite plausible.

Also, for those who might not be familiar with this area, Cowley County preferred to use Stone Arch Bridges instead of truss bridges for small crossings. In the early 1900s, the county would have been much more likely to have installed a Stone Arch Bridge instead of a truss bridge at this location. The Silver Creek and Grouse Creek valleys were popular locations for Stone Arch Bridges to be installed so a truss bridge looks a little bit out of place here.

When looking at the concrete substructure on this bridge, I begin to wonder if it might have been moved to this area sometime around World War II perhaps.

Posted September 11, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yep, sometimes you have to look underneath! Some of these Stone Arch Bridges hide in plain sight.

Posted September 11, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Stone arch hiding under there !!

Posted September 11, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This is an interesting find. Note how close it is to Oklahoma. Well, there are (or were) nearly identical examples in Oklahoma of this same style. So I'm not sure if its the design of a builder, or if its a state design that moved over state lines.

http://bridgehunter.com/ok/kay/123850000000000/

http://bridgehunter.com/ok/kay/123840000000000/

http://bridgehunter.com/ok/kay/45500000000000/

Posted September 11, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Very tidy little thru-truss. Can hardly believe the county is keeping this one, saw noone in the hour I spent there relaxing - zero traffic, very remote....but why "fix what ain't broke"? A classic.

Posted September 10, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks to Nick's field visit, we can see that this bridge features a B.S. Co. Lackawanna brand. This brand indicates that the steel was fabricated after the merger of Bethlehem Steel and Lackawanna. You will only find this brand on bridges that were constructed in the 1920s onward.

Referring back to my previous comment about the scarcity of heavily constructed truss bridges from the 1920s and 30s in Kansas, it becomes apparent that a B.S. Co. Lackawanna brand would be a rare find in Kansas. The presence of this brand increases the local significance of this bridge.

Posted September 10, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Anybody who has spent time looking at truss bridges on the Kansas-Oklahoma border region is well aware of the fact that there is a very stark change in design as one crosses the state line.

Oklahoma is known for its massive membered and heavily constructed truss bridges that were generally built after about 1910, plus a few somewhat lighter bridges that were built between about 1900 and 1910. Oklahoma continued to build a variety of large, heavy truss bridges as the truss bridge era was winding down nationwide. Today, as one drives around Oklahoma, one is likely to encounter some large Parker trusses and Oklahoma's true specialty, the K Parker Truss. By contrast, Oklahoma has very few of the extremely lightweight Victorian era wrought iron truss bridges that can be found in states to the north and east.

After you cross into Kansas, the picture changes dramatically. Kansas has very few large, massive membered truss bridges from the 1920s and 1930s. During the latter part of the truss era, Kansas was building concrete Tee beams and Marsh Arch bridges. Surely these bridges would have cut into the number of trusses that were built at the time. Most of the remaining truss bridges in Kansas are the older and smaller lightweight, pin connected variety which are rare in Oklahoma.

This bridge, due to its massive construction, would fit in perfectly in Oklahoma. Yet and its current location, it is an outlier. A bridge like this is highly significant at the state level in Kansas, just as a wrought iron Victorian era truss would be extremely significant at the state level in Oklahoma.

Posted September 10, 2017, by Don Morrison

If you follow the apparent ROW from that old rail bridge to 37.027264, -96.853121, there is a structure that is not a rail bridge. It's on a different alignment because of a jog in the (dirt?) road that follows the ROW. It appears to have a wood deck and an overhead structure in satellite imagery.

Looks to be on private property, over the spillway of a private impoundment. Checked Cowley (and the adjacent county), but it doesn't appear on BH. Maybe it's a MOB?

Robert Elder documented a Timber Creek bridge that is "most certainly lost". Could it have been moved here? About 15 miles south of the "Try to find on map" default coordinates of the Timber Creek bridge?

What does anyone else think? Do we need someone on the ground?

Who we gonna call?

Nick Schmiedeler!

Posted September 9, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Loved visiting this one today. Gorgeous from the side especially. And plaque stolen....of course...😤

Posted September 9, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

wo....very cool !!

Posted September 9, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

indeed - posted a photo on a Facebook page r/t Kansas abandoned attractions, a local there confirmed this also, there is also a chance from what I read that the actual bridge was moved to a location in Oklahoma and used for road traffic later....thanks Clark

Posted September 9, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nice catch on the Inland brand. I missed that during my field visit.

Posted September 9, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The 1936 county highway map shows the Midland Valley railroad wandering around here. It loops up to meet a spur of the Mo Pac in Silverdale then appears to cross a bit east of here where there is a tall pier visible from above.

Posted September 9, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Now that you mention it, I remember seeing that stone pylon. I would need to have a look at some old maps, but I would not be shocked if it was part of an old railroad bridge.

Posted September 9, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

One of those weird moments where you look at a photo you've just taken and do a double take, noticed the even-older stone pillar in the background of an ancient Grouse Creek crossing ....anyone know the history on that bridge? just west of pinned bridge, just south of tiny quarry town Silverdale

Posted September 8, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Great Find! This one is worthy of a wall of text!

Seriously, this bridge is a bit more significant than you might think. At first glance, it just looks like a pin connected Parker pony truss. Indeed, it is a pin connected Parker Pony Truss.

That being said, this one has at least one rare detail; it features an inclined, or you might say polygonal, bottom cord. Most bottom chords are flat and parallel to the deck. This bottom chord is neither because it is inclined at the end panels.

The bridge has a couple other interesting features as well. For one thing, the top chord features five slopes. This means that it is a true Camelback Truss. The Camelback configuration is less common than a standard Parker Truss. In addition, every full panel on this bridge is countered.

The Kansas default date of Circa 1910 is probably not far off in this case. I doubt that it's newer than 1910 or at least not much newer. On the other hand, I have my doubts that it is pre 1900 because from what I can tell, Parker trusses did not become widespread until about 1900.

My suspicion is that this bridge was probably built sometime between 1900 and 1910. On the other hand, perhaps it could potentially be as old as Circa 1890 or as new as Circa 1915, but for now I won't argue too much with the Kansas default date of Circa 1910.

Posted September 8, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

pretty one, great elevation.....despite map, this road turns private about 100 yds north and there is no thru-connection traveling in that direction

Posted September 8, 2017, by Anonymous

This bridge just had its identity stolen from Equifax. There are now dozens of Reverse Parker Trusses appearing in Nigeria.

Posted September 7, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The Melan system used a series of parallel arched steel reinforcing, often small trusses. See fig. 5 here:

http://www.bma.arch.unige.it/pdf/construction_history_2009/v...

Although the steel may be covered by concrete it is sometimes possible to see a series of lines running parallel to the direction of travel indicating where the metal is beneath (above) the concrete.

Luten strategically placed his steel in the areas under highest tension, e.g. the bottom of the highest part of the arch, saving weight.