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Third Massachusetts Street Bridge

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Photos 

Massachusetts Street Bridge 1951

Oblique view (facing north) of the Massachusetts Street bridge almost completely inundated by the waters of the Kansas River during the Flood of 1951.

Photo uploaded by John Kritos copied from an online student report source - original photo courtesy of Douglas County.

Map 

Description 

The 1,026 foot concrete arch bridge was built by Douglas County and opened in January 1917. The bridge deck originally had a brick surface with a set of streetcar tracks down the middle. The deck was later paved over with concrete and asphalt.

Facts 

Overview
Lost Open-spandrel arch bridge over Kansas River on US 24/US 40/ Massachusetts Street in Lawrence
Location
Lawrence, Douglas County, Kansas
Status
Replaced by new bridge
History
Built by Douglas County in 1917 - Demolished late 1970s
Design
Open-spandrel arch
Dimensions
Total length: 1,026.0 ft.
Also called
Kansas River Bridge
Approximate latitude, longitude
+38.97515, -95.23601   (decimal degrees)
38°58'31" N, 95°14'10" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
15/306301/4316396 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Lawrence East
Inventory number
BH 39833 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • August 19, 2013: Updated by Robert Healey: Fixed name pending addition of other Mass St. bridges
  • May 12, 2011: New Street View added by Sheldon Wiens
  • March 26, 2010: Updated by John Kritos: Updated year built and lost, total length, added history, and photo.
  • February 11, 2009: Added by Robert Elder

Related Bridges 

Sources 

  • Robert Elder - robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com
  • John Kritos - jmkrito [at] yahoo [dot] com
  • Sheldon Wiens

Comments 

Massachusetts Street Bridge
Posted February 5, 2013, by jayhwak

Here is a postcard of the metal truss which preceded this concrete arch. I found it in the Lawrence, KS antique mall. The date on the bottom "2-6-'08" is actually February 6th, 1908!

Uploaded file: PNG image, 3220 x 2116, 8-bit/color RGB, non-interlaced, 20448575 bytes

Massachusetts Street Bridge
Posted March 13, 2012, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Have fun in Fort Scott. Hope you have good weather for bridgehunting. Good luck finding the Mill Creek Pratt truss if you attempt it.

Massachusetts Street Bridge
Posted March 12, 2012, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

made me laugh too, but there was no body, just legs. I love seeing the truss bridges that have a different style - 1 out of four. Just passed a train bridge going into Oklahoma. Now I am going out of Oklahoma and stopping in Fort Scott.

Massachusetts Street Bridge
Posted March 12, 2012, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

As long as she is not wearing bunny slippers!

Massachusetts Street Bridge
Posted March 12, 2012, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Whatever the date it gave me a good chuckle for the day Robert...thanks!

Massachusetts Street Bridge
Posted March 12, 2012, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Disregard the hosiery comment...apparently the article is more modern that 1868. For some reason my browser identified that as the year.

I should not post while abstaining from coffee...

Massachusetts Street Bridge
Posted March 12, 2012, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks for these links.

Completely off topic, but that 1868 newspaper contains a hosiery add that might have been considered a tad bit racy for its time. Women showing their legs...for shame!

Massachusetts Street Bridge
Posted March 11, 2012, by Anonymous

Here's a picture of this bridge from a project by the local newspaper, the Lawrence Journal World:

http://www2.ljworld.com/photos/galleries/2011/jul/20/dear-lawrence/85038/

Apparently, there were several truss bridges that preceded the open spandrel arch. This is a photo of one of them. There does not seem to be a page for this guy on Bridgehunter:

http://www2.ljworld.com/photos/galleries/2011/jul/20/dear-lawrence/84864/

Here's an article from the same newspaper on the truss bridges - the first was finished in 1863:

http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=b4kyAAAAIBAJ&sjid=keYFAAAAIBAJ&pg=7472%2C4531498