Rating:
3 votes

Duncan Creek Bridge

Photos 

Photo taken by Robert Elder in August 2008

Enlarge

BH Photo #122386

Map 

Facts 

Overview
Through truss bridge over Duncan Creek, 0.5 mi. north of Blair
Location
Doniphan County, Kansas
Status
Open to traffic
History
Built 1935
Design
Four panel, pin-connected Parker through truss
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 85.9 ft.
Total length: 90.9 ft.
Deck width: 18.4 ft.
Vertical clearance above deck: 19.9 ft.
Recognition
Eligible for the National Register of Historic Places
Approximate latitude, longitude
+39.79222, -95.00251   (decimal degrees)
39°47'32" N, 95°00'09" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
15/328543/4406614 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Troy
Inventory numbers
KS 000000000220260 (Kansas local bridge number on the National Bridge Inventory)
BH 17690 (Bridgehunter.com ID)
Inspection (as of 02/2015)
Deck condition rating: Fair (5 out of 9)
Superstructure condition rating: Fair (5 out of 9)
Substructure condition rating: Fair (5 out of 9)
Appraisal: Functionally obsolete
Sufficiency rating: 29.7 (out of 100)
Average daily traffic (as of 2005)
196

Update Log 

  • February 3, 2010: Updated by Robert Elder: Adjusted GPS Coordinates.
  • October 24, 2008: Updated by Robert Elder: Updated Categories
  • August 25, 2008: New photos from Robert Elder

Sources 

Comments 

Duncan Creek Bridge
Posted February 1, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks for creating the PDF. Hopefully that will answer John's question.

Duncan Creek Bridge
Posted February 1, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yes, I have spent some time looking at your photos. Good stuff as always.

I honestly don't think that many individuals realize that bridges are sometimes "Frankenbridges". I had to spend quite a bit of time looking at bridges before I realized this.

Duncan Creek Bridge
Posted February 1, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Links posted for KHRI sometimes work and sometimes don't its easier to upload a PDF of the report, which I have done here for the Bendena Vicinity Rock Creek Truss Bridge. See also my listings for this Randolph Road Bridge (former railroad) and two other bridges, one is a shortened/relocated highway thru truss, the other is an a-frame highway truss totally made from salvaged truss parts (likely highway truss).

http://historicbridges.org/b_a_county.php?county=Doniphan%20...

Long story short, this county loved to reuse bridges and bridge parts.

Attachment #1 (application/pdf; 429,435 bytes)

Duncan Creek Bridge
Posted February 1, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge has an odd feature (okay, it has a lot of odd features) - the portal bracing does not touch the endposts. Instead, the portal bracing rests on the oversized hip verticals. Apparently, the hip verticals are massive enough to provide stability for the portal bracing.

Duncan Creek Bridge
Posted June 30, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I would need to check county records to confirm the date of 1935, but it might be a legitimate date of construction given the fact that the individual parts are older than the bridge.

Duncan Creek Bridge
Posted June 30, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Well, there used to be. The demolished Bendena Vicinity Rock Creek Bridge was a short Pratt Truss built from recycled parts. I just realized that it has not been added to Bridgehunter.

Here is the KSHS link, which may or may not work.

http://khri.kansasgis.org/?url=khri

Duncan Creek Bridge
Posted June 30, 2016, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Robert,

Are there more like this in Doniphan County?

Also, the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy relocated trusses as well. This probably does not help, since these appear to be the two main railroads in the county.

Duncan Creek Bridge
Posted June 30, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Good to know that the Santa Fe did that on a regular basis. The first thing I noticed about this bridge, other that it's peculiar configuration, were the massive hip verticals which Nathan mentioned below. The massive lower chord was also a dead giveaway.

This was not the only recycled railroad bridge in Doniphan County.

Duncan Creek Bridge
Posted June 29, 2016, by John Marvig

The Santa Fe was very notorious for relocating and reusing trusses in the area. However, it very clearly was widened with new portals and stringers. Very unique. Looks like another for the bucket list...

Duncan Creek Bridge
Posted June 29, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

To clarify, I don't necessarily think that this one is composed only from parts of a single structure. That being said, when a major river bridge gets removed, there will be a lot of useable material.

Duncan Creek Bridge
Posted June 29, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge makes me want to research any local Missouri River railroad bridges that may have been replaced in the 1920s-1930s. Leave it to a creative county engineer to find a way to turn big bridges into little bridges.

Duncan Creek Bridge
Posted June 12, 2016, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Field visited this bridge June 2016. Photos to eventually/someday end up on HistoricBridges.org. Key finding: This is a "FrankenBridge" pieced together from some other railroad bridge. Evidence: Heavy member design indicative of a railroad bridge. The hip verticals are ridiculously oversized. Numerous empty rivet holes are evidence of reused bridge parts. Riveted splices on diagonal members indicate the eyebars were shortened. The top chord ends at an angle with an outward facing place having empty rivet holes: strong evidence that this top chord is a reused end post.

Duncan Creek Bridge
Posted September 16, 2008, by Robert L. Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The laced endposts would also seem to indicate an earlier construction date (ie not 1935).

Duncan Creek Bridge
Posted September 16, 2008, by David A. Shaw (scpry [at] gwi [dot] net)

This is indeed an unusual bridge. It almost looks like it was put together with spare parts that were found around the shop. I dont know wheather it's true or not, but it's an interesting bridge just the same.

Duncan Creek Bridge
Posted September 15, 2008, by Robert L. Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I am thinking that this bridge may be pre 1900 myself. Pinned joints and eyebars are rarely found on bridges built after 1910, even in rural areas.

I was quite surprised when I accidentally discovered this bridge several years ago. It is definitely an interesting structure.

Duncan Creek Bridge
Posted September 15, 2008, by Anthony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I would say the date given for this bridge is way off. Looks like a pre-1900 bridge.

Duncan Creek Bridge
Posted September 15, 2008, by Anthony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Just checking the home page for the Cottonwood Creek Bridge and found this equally unusual bridge in the same county. It's by far the smallest Parker Through I've seen.