Rating:
1 vote

SKOL - Walnut River Bridge

Photos 

This bridge is a double span, seven panel, pin connected Pratt through truss and remains open to railroad traffic.

Photo taken by Robert Elder in March 2007

Enlarge

BH Photo #111734

Map 

Street View 

Facts 

Overview
Pratt through truss bridge over Walnut River on South Kansas & Oklahoma Railroad
Location
Winfield, Cowley County, Kansas
Status
Open to traffic
History
Built 1903, Approach Rebuilt 1925
Railroads
- Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway (ATSF)
- BNSF Railway (BNSF)
- South Kansas & Oklahoma Railroad (SKOL)
Design
Pratt through truss
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 145.0 ft.
Total length: 350.0 ft.
Approximate latitude, longitude
+37.24390, -97.00332   (decimal degrees)
37°14'38" N, 97°00'12" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
14/677097/4123796 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Hackney
Inventory number
BH 36260 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • November 1, 2017: New photos from John Marvig
  • February 26, 2014: New photo from Jack Schmidt
  • May 27, 2013: Updated by Luke Harden: Added category "Railroad"
  • March 17, 2010: Updated by Robert Elder: Adjusted GPS Coordinates
  • March 9, 2010: Updated by Robert Elder: Added Street View link - I had no idea that there was a roadway underneath this bridge.
  • July 14, 2009: Updated by Robert Elder: Edited City and Categories.
  • February 12, 2008: Added by Robert Elder

Sources 

  • Robert Elder - robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com
  • John Marvig - marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com
  • Jack Schmidt - jjturtle [at] earthlink [dot] net

Comments 

SKOL - Walnut River Bridge
Posted November 1, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks, Michael. That makes sense.

Robert

SKOL - Walnut River Bridge
Posted November 1, 2017, by Michael Quiet (mquiet [at] gmail [dot] com)

Robert,

In my travels I've found quite a few Pin-connected railroad bridges where the first panel or two of the bottom chord is a built up compression member, so it was likely an original feature. I always figured it was due to the heavier/faster rolling stock that was expected where the last panels needed to handle compression forces. I've yet to see a highway bridge with this arrangement.

http://bridgehunter.com/vt/washington/bh61006/

http://bridgehunter.com/nh/grafton/connecticut-river/

http://bridgehunter.com/nh/grafton/rr-connecticut-river/

SKOL - Walnut River Bridge
Posted November 1, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

On many bridges with eyebar bottom chords, the eyebars get thicker towards the middle of the span. See photo #40 for this abandoned wagon bridge as an example:

http://bridgehunter.com/ks/butler/bh48844/

BUT...on this bridge the bottom chord is thickest at the ends of the span. Perhaps this span had thinner eyebars at the end of the trusses originally. I need to have a closer look, but I would not be surprised if those I-beams on the ends are modifications that might have replaced eyebars at some point in time.