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Coffey County Historical Museum Truss Bridge

Photos 

Photo taken by Nick Schmiedeler in July 2018

Enlarge

BH Photo #429987

Map 

Street View 

Facts 

Overview
Pratt pony truss bridge on Boardwalk
Location
Burlington, Coffey County, Kansas
Status
Open to pedestrians only
Design
Half-hip Pratt pony truss
Approximate latitude, longitude
+38.19452, -95.75024   (decimal degrees)
38°11'40" N, 95°45'01" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
15/259153/4230973 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
John Redmond Dam
Land survey
T. 21 S., R. 15 E., Sec. 27
Inventory number
BH 79726 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • July 2, 2018: New photos from Nick Schmiedeler
  • December 14, 2017: New Street View added by Dana and Kay Klein
  • December 14, 2017: Added by Robert Elder

Sources 

Comments 

Coffey County Historical Museum Truss Bridge
Posted July 4, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

my thoughts exactly, Robert, your input is totally worth passing on to museum folks also in my opinion, that 10 year difference is pretty gigantic really....(new plaque time?)....the newspaper article is pretty solid evidence also

Coffey County Historical Museum Truss Bridge
Posted July 3, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

1913 makes much more sense to me than 1923 as a construction date. By 1923, the pin-connected era was over. Even 1913 is rather late for a pin-connected bridge, but this particular structure was built in a rural area where pin-connected technology might have still been in use, albeit on the wane.

This bridge is rather heavily built for such as small bridge. Thus, it probably does date to the latter part of the pin-connected era. Thus, it looks exactly like what I would expect a 1913 pin-connected Pratt pony truss to look like.

Whenever I see a pin-connected truss with a post-1920 construction date, I always assume that the date is either an error, or a relocation/rehabilitation date.

This bridge was obviously narrowed when it was moved to the museum. Although I always prefer to see a bridge maintained at its proper width, the county deserves praise for preserving the most important aspects of this bridge. Such preservation is far preferable to demolition.

Coffey County Historical Museum Truss Bridge
Posted July 2, 2018, by Luke

The following Newspaper.com OCR text for the August 11th, 1913 edition of Burlington, Kansas' Daily Republican mentions "The new Bennett bridge in Ottum", which I assume to be Ottumwa Township.

https://www.newspapers.com/newspage/124504913/

Coffey County Historical Museum Truss Bridge
Posted July 2, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Thanks for making the journey Nick.

Coffey County Historical Museum Truss Bridge
Posted July 2, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

1923 !! Bennett Bridge !! From Coffey County !! Built by KC Bridge Co. !! Donated mid-90's, young staff had no idea where it was originally placed, or if that was the same year it was disassembled from unknown spot...I imagine someone here knows it's original location....neat old 5hing

Coffey County Historical Museum Truss Bridge
Posted July 2, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Visited Coffey Co. Museum today, honestly one of the better County museums in Kansas, room after room, amazing....but the bridge....

Coffey County Historical Museum Truss Bridge
Posted December 14, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

So, it appears to have bottom chords but no floor beams if I am seeing this right.

I would like to do a field visit to this bridge, but I probably won't be in the area in the immediate future.

Coffey County Historical Museum Truss Bridge
Posted December 14, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I second Clark, the floorbeams appear to be missing. They put transverse timbers on top of the bottom chord (like a bowstring) in place of the steel floorbeams.

Coffey County Historical Museum Truss Bridge
Posted December 14, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I believe that the apparent lack of bottom chords is actually an optical illusion. From what I can tell, the bridge appears to have bottom chords but it appears to be missing its deck stringers.

I cannot say for certain that the bottom chords are the original bottom chords, but I am operating under the assumption that they are original.

I am very interested to know what the plaque says. It might give us more information that could be useful in interpreting the Dinner Creek Bridge that I linked in the previous comment.

The loss of deck stringers might reduce the historic integrity slightly but it is certainly not devastating by any means. Bridges did occasionally have deck stringers replaced. Even transverse floor beams get replaced on occasion. On some bridges that get exposed to salt, even the bottom chords have to be replaced. The nice thing about this bridge, is it appears to me the all of the important stuff is there. Overall, this bridge appears to have good historic integrity. I am very glad to see that Coffey County made the effort to save this one.

Coffey County Historical Museum Truss Bridge
Posted December 14, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

It has a builder plate but seems to be missing the floor beams and lower chords.

Coffey County Historical Museum Truss Bridge
Posted December 14, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hey, does anybody on here like bridges? Good, because a Pratt pony truss has surfaced at the Coffey County Historical Museum in Burlington, Kansas. You can see a photograph of it here:

https://www.facebook.com/coffeymuseum/photos/a.2005272466243...

The bridge is very similar to this one:

http://bridgehunter.com/ks/coffey/160977505646/

Further research is needed...

Hats off to Coffey County for saving this bridge! They deserve recognition for a job well done!