Rating:
1 vote

Dinner Creek Bridge

Photos 

Photo taken by Nick Schmiedeler in January 2017

Enlarge

BH Photo #375657

Map 

Facts 

Overview
Pony truss bridge over Dinner Creek on Emmer Lane, 1.5 mi. south of Gridley
Location
Coffey County, Kansas
Status
Closed to all traffic
History
Built 1913
Design
Three panel pin connected Half-hip Pratt pony truss
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 39.0 ft.
Total length: 40.0 ft.
Deck width: 13.1 ft.
Approximate latitude, longitude
+38.07500, -95.87667   (decimal degrees)
38°04'30" N, 95°52'36" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
15/247668/4218044 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Gridley
Inventory numbers
KS 000160977505646 (Kansas local bridge number on the National Bridge Inventory)
BH 17609 (Bridgehunter.com ID)
Inspection (as of 01/2008)
Deck condition rating: Imminent Failure (1 out of 9)
Superstructure condition rating: Poor (4 out of 9)
Substructure condition rating: Poor (4 out of 9)
Appraisal: Structurally deficient
Sufficiency rating: 19.0 (out of 100)
Average daily traffic (as of 2004)
5

Update Log 

  • January 11, 2017: Updated by Robert Elder: Added category "Pin-connected"
  • January 11, 2017: New photos from Nick Schmiedeler

Sources 

  • Nick Schmiedeler
  • Robert Elder - robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com

Comments 

Dinner Creek Bridge
Posted January 12, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I suspect either designer names, or perhaps County Commissioners. It is hard to tell from the remnants of the plaque. At least we have the date, so we could probably figure out who the Commissioners were and perhaps match names.

Dinner Creek Bridge
Posted January 12, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Probably just the designers' names.....

Dinner Creek Bridge
Posted January 12, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Recognize that bridge company name on the broken plaque at all? Struble Fields or some such?

Dinner Creek Bridge
Posted January 11, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Too bad it is full of trash. Great bridge though. It is good to see photos on here.

Dinner Creek Bridge
Posted January 11, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Was also curious about that structure - guessing a well, but a very odd location for one - possibly H2O for horses crossing in the early days? Heck I dunno - full of garbage sadly now.

Dinner Creek Bridge
Posted January 11, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hats off to Nick for another great discovery!

This bridge is interesting for a couple of reasons. This is a pin connected Pratt pony truss, but it was built at the twilight of the pin connected era. By about 1910 - 1915, riveted connections were quickly replacing pinned connections, even in remote areas. The change happened much earlier (generally speaking) in urban areas.

Furthermore, this bridge uses loop forged eyebars for the pinned connections. Based on my observations, these tend to be found on older (pre 1905 ish) bridges.

This one has some nice stone abutments. What is the other structure? Well? Cistern?

Dinner Creek Bridge
Posted January 11, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Very cool - a scenic drive down to this old one - pieces of the plaque that remain indicate 1913