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Cherry Creek Bridge

Map 

Facts 

Overview
Lost through truss bridge over Cherry Creek on J-8.4, 3.4 mi. south of West Mineral
Location
Cherokee County, Kansas
Status
Lost
History
Built ca. 1910
Design
Through truss
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 87.9 ft.
Total length: 89.9 ft.
Deck width: 14.1 ft.
Vertical clearance above deck: 16.0 ft.
Approximate latitude, longitude
+37.23167, -94.92167   (decimal degrees)
37°13'54" N, 94°55'18" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
15/329529/4122302 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Hallowell
Average daily traffic (as of 2007)
10
Inventory numbers
KS 000111083006805 (Kansas local bridge number on the National Bridge Inventory)
BH 17557 (Bridgehunter.com ID)
Inspection report (as of July 2013)
Sufficiency rating: 16.9 (out of 100)
View more at BridgeReports.com

Update Log 

  • March 13, 2012: Updated by Robert Elder: Bridge is lost.
  • May 6, 2011: Updated by Robert Elder: Added new NBI info.

Sources 

  • Robert Elder - robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com

Comments 

Cherry Creek Bridge
Posted March 13, 2012, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Well, they might have taken the bridge out shortly after the KHRI photo was taken...would have definitely grown back over by now.

At first glance the plaque in the photo looks like it might be a Canton bridge.

Cherry Creek Bridge
Posted March 13, 2012, by julie bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

if that bridge was taken it was some time ago. i could call county. completely overgrown and sign totally rusted.

Cherry Creek Bridge
Posted March 13, 2012, by julie bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

if that bridge was taken it was some time ago. i could call county. completely overgrown and sign totally rusted.

Cherry Creek Bridge
Posted March 13, 2012, by julie bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

if that bridge was taken it was some time ago. i could call county. completely overgrown and sign totally rusted.

Cherry Creek Bridge
Posted March 13, 2012, by Anonymous

Not sure how widespread scrapping is these days. I know they got that one in Pennsylvania.

Regardless, scrappers need to be pursued seriously and prosecuted as they are stealing public property.

Cherry Creek Bridge
Posted March 13, 2012, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I will change the status to lost under the assumption that the bridge is not disassembled and in storage.

Cherry Creek Bridge
Posted March 13, 2012, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

That's a a shame to hear Julie.

Doubt that the county took it out after sitting abandoned for so many years, that other abutment might have collapsed. Otherwise, would suspect that scrappers got to it.

Cherry Creek Bridge
Posted March 13, 2012, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Julie: This is bad news, but at least we know for sure. You probably got down there just in time before the road gets overgrown. I tried in July of 2010, but there was just no way I could get through at that time of year.

Cherry Creek Bridge
Posted March 13, 2012, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Robert, following your itinerary. This bridge is no longer there although there are stone abutments intact on one side. Took my bicycle down the road to the dirt path. Will post photos later.

Am now in Erie, and researching that.

I am spending the day in Fort Scott, having dinner with the folks from the Riverfront Authority.

Cherry Creek Bridge
Posted July 11, 2010, by Cliff Darby (clif30 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

@ Robert

I got eaten alive by chiggers (we call them red bugs) while poking around the woods a month or so ago, and we stumbled upon a lost timber stringer bridge near an abandoned gravel pit. The coincidences of life.

Cherry Creek Bridge
Posted July 11, 2010, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I attempted to find this bridge on 3 July 2010. The road is now just an overgrown dirt path. As I did not feel like contending with poison ivy, snakes, and chiggers, the status of this bridge remains unknown.

Cherry Creek Bridge
Posted May 11, 2010, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

It should be possible to develop something that would scan for bridges buried in the woods, because metal would have largely different properties from the organic material composing the trees around them.

Being as HistoricBridges.org can usually barely afford to make a bridge trip, we won't be launching a satellite into space anytime soon however.

Cherry Creek Bridge
Posted May 11, 2010, by Anthony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Why am I not surprised......really

Cherry Creek Bridge
Posted May 11, 2010, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

You guys laugh, but this isn't that far from reality:

http://science.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=10/05/11/1643258

Cherry Creek Bridge
Posted May 11, 2010, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Anthony - that is a great idea. Just let me know when we should quit our day jobs to patent this.

Cherry Creek Bridge
Posted May 11, 2010, by Anthony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Robert, I was thinking that one of us should devise an attachment to go on the satellite that allows it to send a signal(maybe sonar). This could cut through the trees and bounce off of an extant bridge, and then be converted into a 3-D holographic image of said structure. Hmmmmmm....

Cherry Creek Bridge
Posted May 11, 2010, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Upon further review...NBI is still maintaining a page for this bridge, so that gives me a little more hope that it is extant. This bridge is a prime candidate for a bridgehunting expedition next time I can return to Kansas. The road to the bridge appears to be passible from both directions before disappearing into the timber. Thus, I am hoping that I can photograph the plaque, if it still exists.

Whoever thinks that there are no trees in Kansas has never tried to bridgehunt from aerial photographs!

Cherry Creek Bridge
Posted November 13, 2009, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I have found a bridge in Mercer County, Pennsylvania that is listed on historicbridges.org and appears to feature nearly identical portal bracing. http://www.historicbridges.org/truss/carlton/index.htm

The Pennsylvania Bridge was constructed by the Columbia Bridge Works. This bridge in Kansas features none of the distinctive features of the CBW however. It is not constructed of rolled members, and the plaque is not a traditional CBW plaque. A CBW bridge in this area is not out of the realm of possibility, however, as there is at least one CBW bridge in Kansas (Franklin County).

It would be interesting to check the county records (if they still exist), or at least be able to visit the bridge (if it still exists) and view the plaque.

Cherry Creek Bridge
Posted November 13, 2009, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks as always for the feedback, Anthony. I have been looking at Nathan Holth's excellent website historicbridges.org. There are some similar bridges in Crawford Co. Pennsylvania that were built by the Youngstown Bridge Co. in the 1890s. None of them are a perfect match however.

Cherry Creek Bridge
Posted November 13, 2009, by Anthony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I would have to agree with you on this one Robert. This bridge is almost certainly late 1880's-early 1890'S, and is likely wrought iron. I've not seen portal bracing on any other through truss that matches it, and the plaque being on the other side makes any possible identification tough. There is an entry date on the record of Jan. 1966, but I really don't think the picture is that old. It has definitely been abandoned for some time in the photo, and there is a good possibility that it may still exist.

Cherry Creek Bridge
Posted November 13, 2009, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I have found a picture of this bridge at http://khri.kansasgis.org/index.cfm?tab=details&in=021-0000-... This is a small, but ornate five panel, pin-connected Pratt through truss. Given the highly decorative portals, the bridge is almost certainly older then 1910 which seems to be the preferred default date in Kansas.

I have assumed that this bridge was probably lost, but the status of "abandoned" coupled with the fact that there is no UCEB on Google Earth gives me hope that we may have an "Elvis" bridge - a seemingly lost bridge that later reappears. It is hard to tell from Google Earth because the area around the bridge consists of heavy timber.

Any feedback on this bridge would be welcome. I am curious if anybody recognizes the design of the portal bracing. I have never seen one exactly like this.