Rating:
3 votes

Whitewater Creek Bridge

Map 

Street Views 

Facts 

Overview
Stringer bridge over Whitewater Creek on Local 19w6-24-3
Location
Butler County, Kansas
Status
Open to traffic
History
Built 1911
Design
Stringer
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 37.1 ft.
Total length: 76.1 ft.
Deck width: 14.8 ft.
Approximate latitude, longitude
+37.95028, -97.15222   (decimal degrees)
37°57'01" N, 97°09'08" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
14/662346/4201908 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Whitewater
Inventory numbers
KS 000080841005824 (Kansas local bridge number on the National Bridge Inventory)
BH 46797 (Bridgehunter.com ID)
Inspection (as of 02/2015)
Deck condition rating: Poor (4 out of 9)
Superstructure condition rating: Poor (4 out of 9)
Substructure condition rating: Poor (4 out of 9)
Appraisal: Structurally deficient
Sufficiency rating: 32.3 (out of 100)
Average daily traffic (as of 2015)
25

Update Log 

  • July 12, 2016: Updated by Robert Elder: Added category "Whitewater River (Kansas)"
  • November 5, 2010: Added by Robert Elder

Sources 

  • Robert Elder - robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com

Comments 

Whitewater Creek Bridge
Posted April 2, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Of course, I am assuming that the date of 1911 is correct.

Next time I am in the area, I will have to look underneath to see if floor beams are visible or if the underside is flat.

Whitewater Creek Bridge
Posted April 2, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Not to resurrect an old thread...

But short of looking underneath, I am relatively confident that this is an extremely old example of a concrete through girder. The "railings" look quite thick on this bridge, which makes me suspect that they may have a structural function. In other words, they were designed to do more than just keep a horseless carriage from falling into the Whitewater River.

If this is a through girder, it is among the oldest of its kind in Kansas, a state that built quite a few straight concrete through girders.

Whitewater Creek Bridge
Posted November 5, 2010, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yes, they do call the Ark City bridge a Steel Stringer - good catch. My reference to Concrete Stringer in this case was a typo.

Whitewater Creek Bridge
Posted November 5, 2010, by Matthew Lohry

I find that I have trouble telling the difference between design types with these concrete bridges. I can readily tell the difference between T-beams and stringers, but slabs and through-girders can be a bit more obscure. Take, for instance, the territorial Road Bridge in Hennepin County, MN.

http://bridgehunter.com/mn/hennepin/territorial-road/

This bridge is identified by the NBI as a concrete slab, which outwardly looks like a concrete through-girder. I know the differences between the two design types by definition and function, but it is difficult to tell them apart just by looking at them. Robert, the Cowley County, KS, bridge that you linked in your last comment is oddly classified as a steel stringer, but it looks just like the Territorial Road slab bridge from the outside. Perhaps the stringers are more toward the center, and the outer stringers are covered in concrete. So how do you tell just by looking? Maybe someone that has experience with these bridges can provide some insight?

Whitewater Creek Bridge
Posted November 5, 2010, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Matthew:

Good thought. I had not considered that it might also be a T-beam. Kansas seems to like to call these bridges concrete stringers. I have found a few other examples where they have done this, including this one

http://bridgehunter.com/ks/cowley/bh45647/

In the case of the Arkansas City Bridge, NBI calls it a concrete stringer, but I used the term "inclined concrete through girder" for the design description.

In my opinion, a concrete stringer should look like this modern UCEB: http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q=...

Whitewater Creek Bridge
Posted November 5, 2010, by Matthew Lohry

Robert,

This could also be a concrete T-beam bridge with concrete railings--someone may have possibly seen the beam portion of the T-beam structure down below and mistook them for stringers. The Coon Creek Bridge in Anoka County, MN, is a concrete T-Beam with this type of railing system.

http://www.bridgehunter.com/mn/anoka/coon-creek/

Whitewater Creek Bridge
Posted November 5, 2010, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This appears to be a Concrete Through Girder instead of a Concrete Stringer. If someone more familiar with concrete bridges could enlighten me, I would appreciate it.

The NBI considers this bridge to be possibly eligible for the NRHP and it is nearly 100 years old, so I figured that it would be worthy of adding to Bridgehunter.