Rating:
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Monon - Tippecanoe River Bridge

Photos 

Photo courtesy of the Indiana State Department of Natural Resource, Division of Historic Preservation and Archaeology.

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View more info about Indiana historic bridges from the SHAARD database

BH Photo #156312

Map 

Description 

A very unique span that was removed after the railroad line was abandoned. It is interesting to note that this bridge was constructed long before the Oakdale Dam made Lake Freeman possible. Back then it was simply the Tippecanoe River it crossed and the limestone piers entire length could be viewed. Of course after the river had the dam put in, the water level increased, hiding much of the "tallness" of the piers. I recommend following the link to the "bygone Monon" page that can be found below, to view the bridge in it's early days.

Essay 

Written by James Norwood

See Sources below for link to see this bridge in historic photos.

Facts 

Overview
Lost Deck truss bridge over Tippecanoe River and access roads on former Monon Railroad in Monticello
Location
Monticello, White County, Indiana, and Carroll County, Indiana
Status
Lost
History
Built ca. 1895, demolished ca. 1986
Railroads
- Chicago, Indianapolis, & Louisville Railway (CIL)
- Monon Railroad (MON)
Design
Pin-connected Pratt deck truss with polygonal lower chords
Also called
L&N Railroad Bridge
Approximate latitude, longitude
+40.73054, -86.75558   (decimal degrees)
40°43'50" N, 86°45'20" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
16/520639/4508873 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Monticello South
Inventory number
BH 42288 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • July 30, 2016: New photos from Tony Dillon
  • August 10, 2012: Updated by J.P.: Added category "Railroad"
  • January 27, 2011: New photo from Jacob P. Bernard
  • January 24, 2011: New photo from Jacob P. Bernard
  • March 20, 2010: New photo from Ed Hollowell
  • March 16, 2010: Updated by James Norwood: corrected builder info
  • February 26, 2010: Updated by Anthony Dillon: Added new information
  • April 10, 2009: Essay added by James Norwood

Sources 

  • James Norwood
  • Bygone place of the Monon Monticello page - Scroll down page to see this bridge with many trains as well as the Tioga Bridge. Recent pics of remains of bridge abutments are on Monticello page 2
  • Tony Dillon - spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com
  • Ed Hollowell - erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com
  • Jacob P. Bernard

Comments 

Monon Railroad Tippecanoe River Bridge
Posted January 29, 2011, by Anthony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The Monon Bridge had polygonal lower chords while the other deck truss had conventional parallel lower chords.

Monon Railroad Tippecanoe River Bridge
Posted January 29, 2011, by Anonymous

Looks like the same bridge to me.

Monon Railroad Tippecanoe River Bridge
Posted January 28, 2011, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

Well the current photo #4 is the Monon bridge and in the background you can see the Tioga Rd. bridge which is still there.

Monon Railroad Tippecanoe River Bridge
Posted January 27, 2011, by Anthony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Thanks for the heads-up James! I figured you would be in the know.

Monon Railroad Tippecanoe River Bridge
Posted January 27, 2011, by James Norwood

You are correct Anthony, that is not the Monon bridge. It is however the former Pennsylvania Railroad bridge over the same river that formerly sat near downtown Monticello. It was located beside where today the current Toledo Peoria and Western Railroad bridge resides. I can't remember which side it was, but I remember seeing some pics of the old structure(from pic 4)being removed with the new aka current bridge clearly seen in the same photo. The newer bridge was of course damaged in the 1974 tornado outbreak that heavily damaged White County, but was quickly repaired by then owner Penn Central. Good eye. James

Monon Railroad Tippecanoe River Bridge
Posted January 24, 2011, by Anthony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Picture #4 is not the same bridge, as it doesn't have the polygonal lower chord. Not sure if there were any other deck truss RR spans nearby (apparently if the post card is correct there was!). This is a question for Mr. Norwood to answer.