Rating:
1 vote

Lick Creek Bridge

Photos 

Photo taken by Mike Daffron in April 2014

BH Photo #454584

Map 

Videos 

Lick Creek Bridge

Mike Daffron

Play video

Abandoned Bridges of Indiana # 3

Mike Daffron

Play video on YouTube

Description 

Has long been abandoned. No road on either side of bridge. To the east, travels through woods, sunken where road once was.

Facts 

Overview
Abandoned pony truss bridge over Lick Creek on abandoned county road
Location
Owen County, Indiana
Status
Derelict/abandoned
Design
Half-hip Pratt pony truss (Pinned, 4-panel)
Dimensions
Total length: 46.0 ft.
Deck width: 13.0 ft.
Also called
Old CR 1250W Lick Creek Bridge
Approximate latitude, longitude
+39.28910, -86.99800   (decimal degrees)
39°17'21" N, 86°59'53" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
16/500172/4348859 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Patricksburg
Inventory number
BH 67532 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Categories 

Abandoned (3,330)
Built during 1900s (6,752)
Half-hip Pratt pony truss (464)
Indiana (4,613)
Owen County, Indiana (83)
Pin-connected (3,682)
Pony truss (15,666)
Pratt pony truss (3,462)
Pratt truss (8,675)
Total length 25-50 feet (10,687)
Truss (31,120)
Wooden deck (5,993)

Update Log 

  • September 3, 2019: New video from Mike Daffron
  • August 19, 2019: New photos from Mike Daffron
  • April 1, 2018: New photos from Mike Daffron
  • June 11, 2017: Updated by Dave King: Added categories "Pin-connected", "Wooden deck"
  • June 11, 2017: New video from Mike Daffron
  • May 12, 2015: New photos from Mike Daffron
  • May 11, 2015: Updated by Tony Dillon: Added truss type and additional info
  • May 11, 2015: Added by Mike Daffron

Sources 

  • Mike Daffron - daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com
  • Tony Dillon - spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com

Comments 

Lick Creek Bridge
Posted September 3, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

I Love the moss on the deck !

Lick Creek Bridge
Posted August 20, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Most of what I'm seeing in the pics leads me to it being wrought iron Daniel. The next time I'm in the vicinity I will try to visit it in person.

Lick Creek Bridge
Posted August 20, 2019, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Daniel,

The floor beam truss supports are what are being referenced as cast. The fact that trussed floor beams are used (and still remain!) suggest an early bridge. My gut says early to mid 1880s.

Anyone have a guess as to the maker?

Regards,

Art S.

Lick Creek Bridge
Posted August 20, 2019, by Daniel

I don't see anything here that makes me think cast iron rather than steel. The general construction style looks far newer than 1870s to me.

The only component I see that might be cast is on the floor beam, holding the tension member down.

Lick Creek Bridge
Posted August 19, 2019, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Maybe I am seeing things, but it almost looks to me like the transverse floor beams might have some cast-iron components. If so, that might even put this thing back in the 1870s.

Lick Creek Bridge
Posted August 19, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Mike, I Love the family history !!!

Lick Creek Bridge
Posted August 19, 2019, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

My family have spent a lot of time on and around this old bridge. I used to transport my twin daughters across by having them wrap there arms around my neck while I crossed (one at a time, of course). They are grown now and can traverse it by themselves. My youngest boy would never take my help. He's going into the army next month and one of my daughters is getting married early next year. They are not getting so old that they didn't want to do a little "family hike", as we just recently went back for a visit.

Lick Creek Bridge
Posted August 19, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Abandoned and falling apart my two favorite things LOL

Lick Creek Bridge
Posted August 19, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Love this bridge!

The unusual built-up floor beams, lower connections and light verticals composed of back-to-back channels riveted together suggest an 1880's bridge to me.

Would be an ideal candidate to move to a park or trail!

Lick Creek
Posted May 11, 2015, by Mike Daffron (daffronmike [at] yahoo [dot] com)

My wife use to play on this bridge when she was a kid, otherwise would never have known of it's existence. Cannot be seen except in winter.