Recent Indiana Comments

Post a comment Contact webmaster

Posted November 29, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Mike,

Are you saying this existing plate girder bridge is ALSO being relocated? What is your source of information for this? The construction plans for the relocation of the bowstring to this location appear to call out the demolition of the plate girder. Bach Steel is only doing the work relating to the bowstring and was not subcontracted for any relocation/demolition of the plate girder, so if this is happening the prime must be doing it, and it must be a last minute development? The plate girder bridge is also listed as having been built in 1905 per the project documents (which contradicts the ca. 1930 date given by Dr. James Cooper's database). Not sure which is correct. Here are excerpts from the Special Provision for the demolition:

PRESENT STRUCTURE REMOVE, STR. NO. 3

This work shall consist of removing the existing bridge carrying Water Street over Prides Creek, Pike County Bridge 297, as shown on the plans or as directed by the Engineer. Prior to the commencement of demolition and construction activities, the Contractor shall retain a qualified historian or architectural historian, as defined by the Indiana SHPO, to prepare documentation of Bridge 297, including digital photographs, a digital photo log, a written description of the bridge, a statement of significance of the bridge, and a sketch plan. After the final version of the documentation of Bridge 297 has been received by the three agencies noted above, demolition of the bridge may proceed.

Posted November 29, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The bridge has already been dismantled and restoration work can now commence. Photos courtesy Nels Raynor, Bach Steel. Bach Steel is doing the restoration work on this bridge. Ragle is the prime.

Posted November 29, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I have always been concerned about it remaining in use at that location, and seeing a few really large pickups crossing it while I was there kinda confirmed that. I wish there was a nice park with a creek it could go into but that doesn't appear to be a possibility in Petersburg.

Posted November 29, 2020, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

yip, I wish they would have fixed it up in old location, but... Petersburg is kinda dying, unfortunately. The McDonalds next door went under (!!), the old IGA is defunct. Don't know how much I69 contributed to it, but it sucks. Tornado went thru back in the 90s and tore it up. Hasn't been the same since

Posted November 29, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I'm still not sold on the location. I just hope they develope it into something decent!

Posted November 29, 2020, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Garrett! Good news! Bridge is supposed to be set in another location in Petersburg (not sure where), and the Iron Bridge Road bowstring is to be moved there. There is a picture of the bowstring being lifted up waiting it's relocation in the Pike County Dispatch (Yes, I will post it as soon as I can get it from my parents). If I were to guess, I think that this fellow will end up in Hornady Park about a mile west on Pike Street, just a guess though.

Posted November 29, 2020, by Garrett DiDomizio (garrettdidomizio [at] gmail [dot] com)

Looks like it will be moving soon with the destruction of the Petersburg bridge.

Posted November 29, 2020, by Garrett DiDomizio (garrettdidomizio [at] gmail [dot] com)

Sad it was demolished, but hopefully the new historic bridge that is supposed to be moved there will be well treated in the spot

Posted November 22, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

It's a heavier bridge... period

Posted November 22, 2020, by Luke

There's supposed to be another truss bridge visible in the image, given the "Twin Bridges" nickname.

Said truss isn't visible in your image.

Ergo, your image cannot be from Danville.

Posted November 22, 2020, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

Geographic place Danville (Ind.), Twin Bridges (Danville, Ind.)

Since they got the photo reversed I guess they could have made other mistakes but I am not convinced because you can't see the structure down to creek level in this photo.

Posted November 22, 2020, by Luke

It's definitely not this bridge based on substructure. It's probably another bridge on the same line in the area, as the caption on the IUB database reads "Bridge; Danville trip"

It, by context clues alone, can't be Danville, but it could be any bridge along the line headed into Indianapolis.

e.g. this substructure by the bridge in Avon: https://bridgehunter.com/photos/18/16/181695-L.jpg

Posted November 22, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

It's still not the same bridge. That is a heavier bridge and the substructure is completely different.

Posted November 22, 2020, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

After looking some more, I think the photo view point was from the west side on the road bridge looking up and east. By counting the vertical beams on the rail bridge it shows only about half of the rail bridge is in the picture.

Posted November 22, 2020, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

Something is wrong with the photo, yes. I think the negative may be reversed. From the light it appears to be the north side of the bridge, looking east. The road bridge would be out of frame to the right. Also there is a hand written number in the corner of the photo which is backward and in the right corner. If you mirror the image it is correct in the left corner. It says 28 and something that looks like a J or maybe it's just a line.

Posted November 19, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The 2nd photo has been incorrectly identified by the library as being of this span. It is much heavier than the one replaced by the concrete arches in 1906. Also, the original bridge featured substantial wingwalls that are not seen in the 2nd pic. Lastly, the still extant road bridge sat directly underneath it and would have likely been seen in the photo.

Posted November 16, 2020, by Anonymous

it would appear so, there is nothing stopping anybody from going accross. I myself did not want to though, the bridges do not seem to be in the best condition to be supporting excess weight.

Posted November 16, 2020, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

It's hard to imagine that those kids who were the Brown's children are 75,73 & 71 years old. I wonder if they ever think about their father's bridge?

Posted November 16, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Mr. Brown added that to the bridge after he moved it to his estate in the early 1960's. He also installed an electric eye that would sound an alarm in his house if somebody entered the bridge. Remnants of that system are still in place.

Posted November 16, 2020, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Does anybody know why an oxen yoke is hanging over the entrance to the bridge in some of the pictures?Looks stylish but i never saw one hanging on a covered bridge.Maybe superstition like horseshoes?

Posted November 16, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I've not heard anything recent about the bridge. I know there have been discussions in the past about moving it here or there, but nothing has ever come to fruition. I would assume that the relatives of D.W. Brown still own it but am not sure.

Posted November 16, 2020, by Garrett DiDomizio (garrettdidomizio [at] gmail [dot] com)

Anybody know if anything is currently going on with this bridge?

Posted November 16, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Unfortunately Stone Masonry is mostly a long-lost art.

Posted November 15, 2020, by Luke

Corrugated metal and/or concrete supplemental arches are often used to preserve arch rings.

In some cases, entire arches are encased in concrete for longevity's sake.

Posted November 15, 2020, by Anonymous

Looks as if there is a metal culvert beneath the arch. I wonder if that was laid in after it was built and grouted in as a reinforcement in a repair effort?

Posted November 15, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Mike Daffron, Yes ! I told Tony it was creepy and I Loved It !

Posted November 15, 2020, by Satolli Glassmeyer (info [at] HistoryInYourOwnBackyard [dot] com)

Here's a video I recently did on the bridge: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9C1BtY6i3_I

Posted November 15, 2020, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Ha! Grant, your nite-pic reminds me of the Jordy Verrill episode of "Creepshow"!

Posted November 15, 2020, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hey Grant. Is this bridge open again?

Posted November 9, 2020, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Well, that did sound ridiculous.

Posted November 9, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The Indiana State Preservation Officer scoffed at the county's rediculous plan to ship this beauty to Evansville and build a multi-million dollar slab here. Would not sign off on it.

Posted November 9, 2020, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

I Hope so! Fountain county has an excellent groups of bridges and it is certainly a must-see spot.

Posted November 9, 2020, by SCOTT Ash (sash5282 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Some work was done to the center pier so it must be staying put !

Posted November 7, 2020, by Tom Hoffman

I went looking for evidence of the old bridge today. On the south side the road is roped off with Posted No Trespassing! For the north side the old road appears to be the driveway to the last house before where the bridge was. So I don't know if anyone will ever have a chance to get to go near.

Posted November 7, 2020, by Tom Hoffman

I passed over the daggone UCEB today and noticed an old stone abutment to the east. It very well could have been that of an older metal truss bridge removed in the 30s. I don't remember word of any covered bridge on the Jackson/Bartholomew County line except the one paired with Reddington.

Posted November 6, 2020, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Good news! The park has informed me that they are only replacing the deck on the bridge. It may be closed for a while, but will reopen.

Posted November 4, 2020, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

I just received info that sez that this wonder may be permanently closed. Sure hope not, I will check into it.

Posted November 3, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Carl, love the new photos !

Posted October 31, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Just got word that Ft. Wayne Parks & Rec has this highly significant span on the books for design phase of rehab in 2021. They hope to bid for construction in 2022.

Posted October 31, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Good to see Ed... now if they will rehab it!

Posted October 31, 2020, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

Hey Tony! It looks like your cussing did some good. They must have just cut it down as there are still pine needles on the roof. Now if we can fix the siding.

Posted October 26, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I think you are correct Nathan. I'm not seeing any gusset plates.

Posted October 26, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I think this bridge might be welded instead of riveted, but it appears to date to when the dam was built in 1952.

Posted October 22, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Yeah, I'm not sure where the Massillon label came from, but I corrected the builders info.

Posted October 22, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Tom's suspicions were correct, per James Cooper's notes this bridge does indeed date to 1929.

https://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=i...

Posted October 22, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

According to James Cooper's notes, the through truss actually was built by Rochester and the pony truss is a Vincennes product. I am not sure why Massillon is listed on Bridgehunter?

https://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=i...

Posted October 22, 2020, by Garrett DiDomizio (garrettdidomizio [at] gmail [dot] com)

Still a fun little bridge to drive over. I usually do after church or after stopping at the nearby gas station.

Posted October 21, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Estimated new location: https://goo.gl/maps/553QQHwFtpjNpqx6A

38.209827, -86.118508

Posted October 21, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I must have missed this project in the INDOT Bidding, but it seems this bridge has already been restored and moved to Rice Island in Corydon! I field visited the bridge in May 28, 2019 and there was no sign of construction so this project began sometime after that. https://www.corydondemocrat.com/2020/10/21/bridge-65-gets-ne...

Posted October 20, 2020, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is a really cool project. I wish we would see more of this when railroad trusses are replaced, especially for rail trails. I also love how they managed to rebuild the partially scrapped span at this location as well.

Posted October 20, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

As of early October the other truss span is being assembled.

https://bernewitness.com/news/trail-bridge-construction-is-u...

Posted October 20, 2020, by Geoff Hubbs (geoffrey [dot] hubbs [at] att [dot] net)

I have requested the posts be merged.

Posted October 19, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)
Posted October 18, 2020, by Grant DiDomizio (grantdidomizio [at] gmail [dot] com)

Per INDOT,

https://www.in.gov/indot/2565.htm

Hereís hoping this lovely bridge can be preserved somehow! Driving by it in such a state these past months has been very saddening, and Iíd hate to see if gone forever.

Posted October 18, 2020, by Garrett DiDomizio (garrettdidomizio [at] gmail [dot] com)

I went there today, and looked for a moment to see if I could find the carving stone for the bridge, but I was unfortunately unsuccessful. My guess is that it was probably lost, or crumbled into the creek with the edge of the abutements. Overall, interesting to see the original covered bridge foundation. Wish I couldíve seen the bridge when it was around.

Posted October 16, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Well okay then... I missed these comments! Yes, the # of panels match so it could well be!

Posted October 16, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

To my knowledge it was simply replaced. If it was salvaged for reuse it's news to me. Should have been left alone.

Posted October 15, 2020, by Grant DiDomizio (grantdidomizio [at] gmail [dot] com)

Does anyone know what happened to this bridge?

Posted October 15, 2020, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Sure looks like it.

Posted October 15, 2020, by Grant DiDomizio (grantdidomizio [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge seems to look very similar to the removed Endicot Road Bridge and even has a slightly bent railing like that of the former bridge. Might they be the same bridge?

Posted October 15, 2020, by Grant DiDomizio (grantdidomizio [at] gmail [dot] com)

I did take a picture but I couldnít find it. These google map images are pretty up to date and accurate as to what the bridge looks like though!

Posted October 15, 2020, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

There is talk of an interstate connection of Bloomington and French Lick...Looks like it might go right through this area. Hope not. I'll keep my eyes and ears open

Posted October 15, 2020, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Cool! Did you get a pic?

Posted October 15, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

James Cooper lists an 1887 construction date for this bridge, rather than 1894. Based on style and roadway width, I tend to think his date makes more sense.

Posted October 13, 2020, by Satolli Glassmeyer (info [at] HistoryInYourOwnBackyard [dot] com)

Here's a video I recently did on the history of the bridge: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jF4kZR7IWwg

Posted October 11, 2020, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Cool view, too!

Posted October 11, 2020, by Garrett DiDomizio (garrettdidomizio [at] gmail [dot] com)

Still in nice condition, which is more than can be said for the railroad bridge next to it which seems to be rotting away. The bridge also seems to have become a hangout spot for teens.

Posted October 11, 2020, by Garrett DiDomizio (garrettdidomizio [at] gmail [dot] com)

Itís looking even worse now. Donít know if it will survive another winter.

Posted October 10, 2020, by Garrett DiDomizio (garrettdidomizio [at] gmail [dot] com)

It is a beautiful bridge and I am glad that I got to see it. Itís length alone will blow you away.

Posted October 10, 2020, by Garrett DiDomizio (garrettdidomizio [at] gmail [dot] com)

Itís a beautiful bridge that has been restored to very good condition. Bridge is also very long, as I found out when me and my brother ran and raced across it.

Posted October 10, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I'm not overly fond of the intended location... But yes, I will be happy to have it safe and see it without all the added junk!

Posted October 10, 2020, by Garrett DiDomizio (garrettdidomizio [at] gmail [dot] com)

Very interesting bridge to see. It is a very unique environment and I love it for its historic value and its relation to the notable William T Washer. I hope the county does save it for some future use.

Posted October 10, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Given the timing of when the bridge was built, it is likely that Columbia Bridge Co. (successors to CBW) failed just after being awarded the contract. Their agent likely saved his commissions by quickly working something out with WIBCo.

Posted October 10, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Grant,

I think there has been some holdup on this project due to railroad permitting. But do not worry, the bridge will look better than ever after its restoration!

Posted October 10, 2020, by Grant DiDomizio (grantdidomizio [at] gmail [dot] com)

Went on a late night drive to pay our respects to the bridge. It hasnít been removed yet, but guardrails have been placed on either side to stop entry as well as some of the treads being ripped up. I love the scenery and peaceful setting of the bridge. I hope that whatever is done next will help to restore this bridge to its former glory. It is truly a sight!

Posted October 7, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I've cussed that tree a few times.🤬🤬🤬

Posted October 7, 2020, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

Some recent photos. I don't think the trees growing so close to the bridge helps. Photos from Sept. 25, 2020

Posted October 7, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Yes, it's getting rather shabby.

The original move from out in the county was undertaken as a project by the building trades class at the local high school.

I don't know how much, if any, engineering was involved with the move. I do know I crossed it only a year or two prior to the move and it was beyond dilapidated.

It's definitely time for the county to step up and put some funding into it.

Posted October 6, 2020, by Michael D Wengler (timberframe1wengler [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge is in dire need of structural and cosmetic repairs! 10/7/2020

Posted October 5, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I was wondering that myself Art. A little out of my normal range and it would take some digging to possibly uncover the whole story. Anything is certainly possible as we have found in many other cases.

Posted October 4, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Tony,

What is your confidence that it had bowstrings as its original configuration. The pic with the Pratt and bowstring has what looks like a light Pratt but I think it may be the existing Pratt (note the horizontal strap at mid height).

Could it be that it started as a two span Pratt and when one span washed out, they temporarily put in the bowstring or did it start with bowstrings then just have spans swapped one at a time until today?

Thoughts?

Art S.

Posted October 3, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The Woodruff name goes back to the bowstring truss and the original landowner I do believe. Wasson may have been the LO when the Warren truss replaced the bowstring.

Posted October 3, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This one has Rochester Bridge Company written all over it.

Posted October 3, 2020, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hey Scott! I believe a deck-job would help this fellow out, eh?

Posted October 3, 2020, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Visited this bridge 10-3-20, too early in the fall, too late in the day. Also, too locked up. When was the name changed from Wasson Ford? I noted, while trying to find a southern entry, there was a cemetery just off 35 called Wasson Cemetery.

Posted October 2, 2020, by SCOTT Ash (sash5282 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Looking south towards Grissom AFB

Posted September 30, 2020, by Eric (Egrote [at] fecheliports [dot] com)

Grew up about a half mile from this gem. Yes one of the old mills was still standing and demolished around the same time in mid 80ís. To bad bridge was not left for pedestrian use.

Posted September 29, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I've not been able to turn up any more on this one yet. I feel like it is definitely pre 1900 based on the portals and extensive use of counters. The concrete abutments and piers indicate a possible relocation, as do the mixed size of the spans. State Road 101 (Fahlsing Road) did once have an older truss bridge, so I doubt there is any correlation here. It certainly is possible that Scipio Road was an earlier state road that was decommissioned.

I've used pics of maps before Bob, so I don't think there is much concern.

Posted September 29, 2020, by Bob

This appears to be it from a 1928 road map. It didn't show on my late 30's maps which probably just means it wasn't a main road anymore. (If a picture of a map section is a copyright issue let me know and I won't do it again)

Posted September 29, 2020, by Eric Dansker (arrigo35 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is great! I have wondered about this bridge ever since I first turned down Scipio Road from (old) US 24 years ago, on an "I wonder what's down this road" impulse. A few questions:

1) Was Indiana 101, or another numbered road, ever routed over this bridge?

2) It appears that the former route of Scipio Road north of the river is private property south of where it ends in a barrier. Is there perhaps a way to secure permission from the owner to walk along the former road down to the river? I considered knocking on the door of the house closest to the barrier but chose not to at that time.

3) Any information on that abandoned school building at the junction of Scipio and River Road?

4) Scipio runs diagonally north of Notestine Road. South of Notestine, aerial views show a faint diagonal line extending to the Hamm Interceptor Ditch. It appears that this line was once Scipio Road--any information on this? It appears that Scipio may have continued due south just west of the ditch.

Thanks!

Eric

Posted September 28, 2020, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

Sometime in the past the criteria for "River" was defined as 100 miles long. At that time many 'rivers' became creeks and that may be the case here.

Posted September 27, 2020, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Thanks Tony!

Took a short break from posting CBWs. Tonight was vertical endpost night :^)

Found the location of three of the O&M's Post through trusses and posted a new image of a B&O Fink in WV.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted September 27, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Very cool find!

It is indeed Hogan Creek, which like nearby Laughery Creek are rather sizable streams before their confluence with the Ohio River.

Posted September 27, 2020, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Beautiful day to take the new Liberty on a bridge trip. It was a little dry though...

Posted September 24, 2020, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

Despite this bridge being moved to a very viable location the bridge seems to be suffering both cosmetic and structural damage. Props have been added to support the bridge mid span. I am going to give it some close examination soon to find out what's going on.

Posted September 24, 2020, by David Case

I like how it says they painted the bridges by mixing linseed oil and white lead. Must not have hurt the brothers, they look to have lived a long life.

Posted September 21, 2020, by Roger Deschner (rogerdeschner [at] gmail [dot] com)

Perhaps the one span of the old Nine Span Bridge, that's now in storage awaiting a buyer, will wind up here. Not all that far away.

Posted September 18, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

If you want to see photos of the historic Indian Trail Bridge in its original location, please see full coverage here: https://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=t...

Full list of all bridge parts in storage is available here:

https://engineering.purdue.edu/CAI/SBRITE/Facilities/BCGalle...

Among the parts in storage here are parts of the collapsed I-35W Bridge.

Posted September 17, 2020, by Don Morrison

Aka

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Trail_Road%E2%80%93Bell...

If you want to keep old bridges around, it's a good idea to have folks trained to maintain them, I guess.

here's the original location

https://bridgehunter.com/mi/st-clair/77200066000B010/

Posted September 16, 2020, by Rick McOmber

James, You're right this is kind of the Groom Lake or boneyard of Indiana. Perhaps there are some secret Keystone or Phoenix columns made of titanium hidden in a storage building along with one of my favorite Indiana bridges (Salt Creek Bridge Old SR 158) that sadly disappeared.