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Posted January 23, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Tom,a headache bar can be installed at the intersection with Jackson Road and another one at the intersection with 150w.That way,no trucks can ever get on the bridge and ruin it.All covered bridges and truss bridges should have these due to incompetent truck drivers.

Posted January 23, 2020, by Tom Hoffman

Its about TIME to get those strong headache bars placed at the last driveway before the bridge.That way, any driver of large vehicles who sees the bars should realize that they're too low to fit under. Anyone making deliveries in a large truck should cross the US 41 bridge and take like the next left. Come On! Don't people know what low clearance signs mean? And whoever is driving a large truck for delivery should know the height of their vehicle and realize that low hanging objects could be anywhere. Its about time to get headache bars for the Jackson Bridge.

Posted January 23, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Heavily damaged AGAIN yesterday by an oversized truck. Driver was located and arrested for leaving the scene.

https://www.tribstar.com/news/jackson-covered-bridge-heavily...

Posted January 22, 2020, by Bob

The bridge was hit by an oversized load yesterday.

https://www.14news.com/2020/01/21/traffic-alert-hwy-southbou...

Posted January 18, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Melissa found an article confirming that Morrison (Columbia Bridge Works) was the builder.

Posted January 18, 2020, by Jen Savage (reoracer [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thank you for adding this cute little bridge. I have more photos I will add soon.

Posted January 17, 2020, by Scott Ash (sash5282 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This will be nice when itís done !

Posted January 17, 2020, by Scott Ash (sash5282 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Zero traffic !

Posted January 12, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Yes, we drove across it today after we walked Hazleton.

Posted January 12, 2020, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Alright, Melissa! Great to see this up and going. I am shocked, being it looked so pitiful last time I saw it!!

Posted January 12, 2020, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

My mom graduated from there in (I think) 1957. She and my dad still go every Friday on a "Winslow" get-together with other grads to a selected indy restaurant.

Posted January 12, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Mike Daffron, the photo from the yearbook is amazing. I love it.

Posted January 2, 2020, by Brigette S. Cook Jones (bscjones [at] msn [dot] com)

There were two bridges that crossed the White River at this location. Jim Grey is correct.

We need to remember that the National Road is not always synonymous with Washington St.

The National Road Covered Bridge was built by William Wernwag in 1834. This structure would stand until 1902. We need to remember that at the time of its construction, Indianapolis was only a mile square. So "Washington Street" did not extend outside of the city limits.

Eventually, Washington St did extend out to the White River, and it followed the path of the National Road. That is - it followed the National Road until you got to the river.

The approach to the Covered Bridge was at an angle to the river, so instead of heading straight west, the National Road angled sharply Northwest to meet the bridge entrance. This was the only way across the river. So as Washington St extended as the city grew - it followed the National Road.

However, in 1870 - 72, the first "Washington St" bridge was built across the White River, which took you straight west across the river. So there were two bridges at this crossing - the National Road bridge - a wooden, covered bridge, and the Washington St bridge an iron bridge. The road that angled Northwest from Washington St to meet the old National Road bridge was renamed Washington Ave. Both bridges terminated on the western side of the river - right next to each other.

These two bridges would exist together until 1902.

In 1902, it was determined that the Washington St bridge needed to be enlarged with a wider deck. However, the western terminus of the wooden covered bridge was in the way. So both bridges were torn down, and a larger Washington St bridge that traveled straight west replaced them both in 1904.

This was the bridge that was taken out in the flood of 1913.

Posted December 25, 2019, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

But still try to have a Merry Christmas!

Posted December 25, 2019, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Santa Claus took a crap down the old chimney in Greene County. Another casualty of age: being replaced. There will be no ponies left around here soon. Bah Humbug

Posted December 22, 2019, by Jen Savage (reoracer [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge just had work done on it this year. I did not get any photos of it while I was in the area today, but will at another time.

Posted December 21, 2019, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Bummer, but I'm not surprised. Vigo is not a shining star in the bridge-restoration department.

Posted December 21, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Best guess on the location? Somewhere a bit northeast of the South Ravine bridge (BH 71704).

Posted December 21, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Removed right around the turn of 2016/17:

https://www.tribstar.com/news/local_news/lake-le-fer-foot-br...

Posted December 21, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

After some digging, I think I have the answer.

This was known as the Providence Bridge. According to this book, it spanned a path between Sisters of Providence on the east side and St. Mary-of-the-Woods College on the west.

https://books.google.com/books?id=xvZ39oC1z6MC&pg=PA110&sour...

It was also removed in favor of a straight path across the ravine in 1989.

Incidentally...I have more bad news for you. One of those two interesting bridges in St. Mary's is now gone:

https://www.tribstar.com/news/local_news/lake-le-fer-foot-br...

No idea how far back this bridge dates, but here are some more vintage postcards that date back to the early 1900s that I managed to find while searching:

http://brisray.com/th/tpcards220.htm

Posted December 21, 2019, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

I imagine this is long gone, but there are at least two other interesting bridges in St Marys: the South Ravine Bridge and Le Fer Bridge. Both are now pedestrian bridges. I have been here several times, but not to look for bridges. This now goes on my to-do list.

Posted December 20, 2019, by Anonymous

IN gives $350K for New Harmony Bridge opening

https://www.14news.com/2019/12/20/gives-k-new-harmony-bridge...

Posted December 19, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Tom, you're quite welcome. I'm glad you're enjoying our finds. Tony and I are having a lot of fun finding them !

Posted December 19, 2019, by Tom Hoffman (tehoffm [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Melissa, you keep finding articles and info on bridges in areas where I've found UCEBs or nothing, and I can't help but wonder what the previous bridge was. I never saw any info on this bridge in Cooper's metal bridge book. Also I've asked around what was there before. Some said it was a metal bridge that was either struck by a vehicle, or destroyed by an overweight truck. But, I didn't know there was that bad an accident there. Four vehicles, and eleven people injured, what a mess! Lucky no one was killed. Now I'd like to learn more details of this bridge sometime, like year built, length, and design. Looks like it may have been a Camelback or Parker. As always, Thanks Melissa.

Posted December 17, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Tom, you're very welcome. I'm glad you enjoyed it.

Posted December 17, 2019, by Tom Hoffman

Thanks for finding this article Melissa! I never got to see this bridge, but do remember the article at the front page of Greensburg Daily News when I was like 12. These trucks called 2-ton definitely weigh more than 2 tons(like 14,000 empty). After this bridge collapsed, the engineering firm reduced weight limits on most older bridges in the county. Today Decatur County has no more historic metal trusses open for traffic. Thanks again Melissa.

Posted December 17, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

For Tom Hoffman

Posted December 15, 2019, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

I like the visual reference to the lamp posts and railings of 90 years ago. I have no fondness for the usual "Jersey Barrier" railings that blight so many modern bridges.

Posted December 15, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

I enjoy it.

Posted December 15, 2019, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yes, this is a modern bridge, BUT it is really cool. I will remove it if no one wants it on here. Beautiful area, nice park...

Posted December 14, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Love it

Posted December 14, 2019, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Used to go over this rickety-ass bridge a lot in high school on our way to the then-opened Secrest Ferry bridge. Quite the party destination back in the day.

Posted December 14, 2019, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Found more info on the SHAARD site. This was shown as demolished. I believe a bigger vehicle would make that a fact.

Posted December 14, 2019, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

You will see the Big Creek-Mann Road bridge in the back of the photo, just like you can see this bridge on Mann Road photo. Cool

Posted December 14, 2019, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

The SHAARD site lists this as demolished. Obviously not and thank goodness. I have noticed a few bridges on SHAARD that are considered demolished, like Rattlesnake Creek in Owen County and, until recently, Bruner Creek 1st street bridge. Anyone know why?

Posted December 13, 2019, by James McCray (jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com)

In the eternal wisdom of the great sage Michael Scott, "Thats what she said."

Posted December 12, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I mean sure it's more fun to say it the way the spelling would suggest. But the family name was actually pronounced as if another N was present.

And the true historic name at the time it was built was Pyeatt's Mill Bridge.

Posted December 12, 2019, by Jim (jd [dot] starnes8 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I live 3 miles from this bridge and grew up here for the last 54 years it has been pronounced the same way Webster's dictionary pronounces it. A local tradition is laying rubber on the Boner.

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/boner

Posted December 11, 2019, by Richard Tekulve (canoeindiana [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Actually this is called Otter Creek as it was once designated as the South Fork Vernon Fork Muscatatuck River until the early sixties. USGS maps have changed the name also along with the IN. board of geographic names did in May of 1961. Many features in Ripley County have longtime titles of Otter Creek labeled upon them.

Posted December 10, 2019, by Geoff Hubbs (geoffrey [dot] hubbs [at] att [dot] net)

Mike- I updated the railroad heritage

Posted December 10, 2019, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Sorry, Geoff. I think that I must have put the wrong location on the map because the street view you added was on the still-in-use bridge over Lattas directly off IN67 at Switz City. This bridge is actually parallel to CR250N just off IN231 West of Bloomfield. Map has been fixed. There is no street view

Posted December 8, 2019, by Bruce W Gensel (snhupmb [at] gmail [dot] com)

The bridge was originally part of county road 75 east, until 1960, when the property became a state park.There was a railing on both sides of the bridge some years back the park took both of them because people would climb and jump off the bridge into the creek. Tony could you tell me who you contacted at Indot

Posted December 7, 2019, by Tom Stahl (tjs3110 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I requested the county to inspect this bridge as it is used daily by school buses. The structure is in horrible condition. A disaster waiting to happen.

Posted December 3, 2019, by Jen Savage (reoracer [at] gmail [dot] com)

Found and added a really good old photo from 2014 from this (south/eastbound/girder) side of these really cool set of railroad bridges. Wish they were still there... use to purposely drive out in the country just to look at these.

Posted December 3, 2019, by Jen Savage (reoracer [at] gmail [dot] com)

Found and added a really good old photo from 2014 from this (north/westbound/tunnel) side of these really cool set of railroad bridges. Wish they were still there... use to purposely drive out in the country just to look at these.

Posted November 29, 2019, by Jen Savage (reoracer [at] gmail [dot] com)

I got some photos of this yesterday. It seems strangely out of place there, but is very cool with the obvious 2 sets of tracks. I will post the pictures here soon.

Posted November 29, 2019, by Jen Savage (reoracer [at] gmail [dot] com)

I got to run across this bridge today in the event I did there at Chain O Lakes. I got some photos, which I will post soon. It is a unique bridge, very interesting. I looked and did not see any plaque or any notation. I also found out the regulars there refer to this as "The Troll Bridge"...

Posted November 29, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

They were using the solid plaques by that time Art, so per the usual the news article was likely just off a "bit".

http://bridgehunter.com/in/floyd/blackiston-mill/ (pic #5)

Posted November 28, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Thanks Art !

Posted November 28, 2019, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Nice post/find Melissa!

Tony, I was going to say that it looked like a mid 1880ís King. Then I took a closer look and saw the plaques. Good call. Now my question: doing the math, based on the age of the bridge mentioned in the article and the date of a article, the bridge is from 1888. However, was WIBCo still using the upper open work plaque that late?

Regards,

Art S.

Posted November 27, 2019, by Tom Hoffman

I wonder what the length of each of the two spans was. I'm thinking they were over 200 feet.

Posted November 24, 2019, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Carroll County is a really sharp area. Hope you got to see most of the goodies!

Posted November 24, 2019, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

I've been taking lots pix of Covered Bridges lately. Mainly because there are several around me. Love the truss best, but Covered are pretty darn good too. I go wherever the Bridge-mobile takes me...

Posted November 24, 2019, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge is now closed to all. Billie Creek village is closed and there are no trespassing signs everywhere. Shame. This was a great place to take the kids. We had a lot of good times there!

Posted November 24, 2019, by Scott Ash (sash5282 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

It was a good day !

Posted November 23, 2019, by Anonymous

I think the Long Covered Bridge was destroyed in the 1913 flood though it's sister bridge at Salt Creek was only damaged. I think there was some rebuilding using the piers and abutments of the Long Bridge but I expect it was only temporary. The old US 52 bridge I remember is where the current bridge stands and if I remember correctly it was one of the IDOT's standard truss bridges which stood until the 1980's.

My guess was that a temporary bridge on the old covered bridge footings was in use as US 52 bridge until the truss bridge was built in the current bridge location in the late 1920's or 1930's.

BTW- The Long Covered bridge as well as the Salt Creek Covered Bridge were known by the locals as the "Twin Bridges".

Posted November 23, 2019, by William Arnold (joeandbeaa [at] gmail [dot] com)

US 52 was formed in 1926. This bridge replaced just a few years later. Maybe it was a casualty of the transition of Brookville Road into becoming part of the highway system?

Posted November 23, 2019, by William Arnold (joeandbeaa [at] gmail [dot] com)

US 52 was formed in 1926. This bridge replaced just a few years later. Maybe it was a casualty of the transition of Brookville Road into becoming part of the highway system?

Posted November 22, 2019, by Scott Ash (sash5282 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

It still exists !

Posted November 20, 2019, by Anonymous

Like Gartin Ford and Salt Creek in Decatur County, Indiana

Posted November 20, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Central States indeed built a good number of highway plate girders in their heyday. I've also seen several Chicago Bridge Company ones.

Posted November 20, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I added Jim Cooper's notes, he seems to indicate that this bridge company built a number of highway plate girders.

Posted November 20, 2019, by Bruce Bridges (railfan727 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge design is far more common on railroads than highways. Could this possibly be a former RR bridge that was purchased and moved to the site?

Posted November 16, 2019, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

There's more than corn in Indiana

Posted November 16, 2019, by Anonymous

In any other state, the sign would say "modern bridge ahead replaced historic bridge 5 years ago".

Posted November 16, 2019, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Bridge still here as of November 16, 2019

Posted November 16, 2019, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Bridge still here as of November 16, 2019.

Posted November 2, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Tom, I wish I had better photos of this bridge. I'm sure it was beautiful in its prime.

Posted November 1, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Tom, you're welcome, it's my pleasure.

Posted November 1, 2019, by Tom Hoffman

Another UCEB I crossed while making a delivery. I saw the 1972 plaque and looking at the area it looked like it could have been a two span thru truss. From what Melissa posted it turned out I was right. Man, an 1878 Whipple truss! That had to have been quite a bridge at time of construction. Too bad it had to take too many beatings from heavy vehicles. The gates have to be to close the road during flooding cause the area on both sides look like a flood area.

Posted November 1, 2019, by Tom Hoffman

Melissa, thanks for the info on this bridge as well. Another area I'd been too crossing a daggone UCEB to wonder what the previous bridge was. A spectacular two span Whipple truss that once existed. I guess people who don't know how to drive has been a problem for awhile.

Posted October 29, 2019, by Jeff Wieland (jjwieland [at] gmail [dot] com)

Clearance is currently 11'2", but trucks still hit it (like today).

Posted October 23, 2019, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Very cool. Also, the home on the east end of the old brick road have several horse and cattle....And a large camel! I will return and get best photos in the cooler months. Man! My to-do list is getting BIG

Posted October 23, 2019, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

The "Dixie Highway" was, like the Lincoln Highway a series of old and new roads linked together as national highway. It is very likely that the road existed before they named it as a part of The Dixie Highway.

Posted October 22, 2019, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Bridge still closed as of October 20, 2019

Posted October 22, 2019, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Checked this out and the brick pavement is actually the OLD New Ross Road. I'm supposing that the Old Dixie Highway is an even older version of the New Ross Road. I will return in the winter. The pix I took are crap, as I took them from 136 looking under the railroad bridge through pretty thick veg, but it shows the bridge still exists.

Posted October 21, 2019, by Jen Savage (reoracer [at] gmail [dot] com)

I remember some very brave school bus drivers maneuvering under this thing... It was narrow and short and had very tight turns on both ends. I know I have some photos of the underpass when it was still intact somewhere.

Posted October 21, 2019, by Jen Savage (reoracer [at] gmail [dot] com)

For the record, here is a photo of the original wooden covered bridge in Peru. The tollhouse on the left of the bridge is actually still there! You can also see a small bridge in front of (to the north of) the covered one, that went over the Wabash & Erie canal I am sorry, I do not know who to credit for this...

Posted October 21, 2019, by Jen Savage (reoracer [at] gmail [dot] com)

Just got a confirmation this bridge was taken down in 1984. I remember long lines of cars waiting for the C&O trains that went across the north end of this bridge....

Posted October 17, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The date was provided by INDOT when they listed the oldest bridges still under state jurisdiction. I'm not sure if it came from research or if perhaps the plaque from it still exists. Several other lost examples of this unique truss were dated from the same year.

Posted October 17, 2019, by Bruce W Gensel (snhupmb [at] gmail [dot] com)

Great picture of the Canoe Camp Bridge. How did you find out the year 1893?

Posted October 16, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Yeah, I get excited at historic bridges too but...

Posted October 16, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Yes and I drove by there several weeks ago but was behind on an agenda and didn't take the time to stop. Wish I had...

I did notice the new Green paint job!

Posted October 16, 2019, by Jen Savage (reoracer [at] gmail [dot] com)

I guess the bridge reopened this morning. Found this video, hope you can see it.... https://www.facebook.com/david.birnell/videos/28730647427261...

Posted October 16, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

A photo of the ribbon cutting is available here.

http://www.huntingtoncountytab.com/community/36291/now-open

Posted October 16, 2019, by Sam Plew (slodplew [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This is the Monon bridge, not the parallel Bloomington Southern/IC bridge. All IC bridges on this route were wooden trestles. Nearly all Monon bridges were steel girder on stone piers.

Posted October 16, 2019, by Tom Hoffman

Okay, it's been four years and nothing new on BH. Is there any word on how the rehabilitation went that year? Also, I wonder how the bridge looks now.

Posted October 16, 2019, by Jen Savage (reoracer [at] gmail [dot] com)

After some thinking, I do know exactly where this bridge is!!!! I will be out there Thanksgiving weekend and will have to get some new photos when I run across it!!

Posted October 16, 2019, by Jen Savage (reoracer [at] gmail [dot] com)

Well darn, I was at COL park last weekend. I am going to have to look for this next time I am out there. I run the trails there alot, am trying to remember if I have seen this at any point.

Posted October 13, 2019, by Tom Hoffman

The rails on this stone arch have been greatly restored instead of replaced by guardrail(except for one concrete spot). I don't think I've seen something like this done on a stone arch. Too many Decatur County stone arches have been horribly altered to a UCEB top. It makes me wonder who the county had fix the rails, and this person/company should do it to many more.

Posted October 11, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

It is so good to see this beauty making a comeback! I talked to the Boone County Engineer about installing off-structure headache bars on this and the Creek Road Bridge. He did inform me that even when complete, this bridge will remain closed until a nearby development is completed.

Posted October 11, 2019, by Jim Grey (mobilene [at] gmail [dot] com)

Here's a photo of the work in progress, courtesy Mark Finch.

Posted October 8, 2019, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

This great bridge just got removed today. On it's way to Brown County. I was at my crap-hole job while it was being removed. Will try to post a video asap.

Posted October 4, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I was at the bridge a few weeks ago and actually drove across it, but totally forgot to update the status so thank you for that Art!

As far as the name goes, the true historic name of the bridge is the Hursh Mill Bridge being built for the 1870's mill that stood next to it. The name Hurshtown is actually a misnomer because a town never developed at the location. The Hurshtown name is actually used in conjunction with the water reservoir that was built nearby. The Van Zile Road name has been used the longest simply because along with "Bridge #32" that is what the Allen County Highway Department has called it.

Posted October 2, 2019, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Tony,

Came across this YouTube video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qjks6pvu1JY

Assuming the July 2018 date on the video is correct, the bridge is open with a 10 ton load limit.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted October 1, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Thank you Nathan!

I wasn't sure if this was in his database and hadn't had time to check. I remember when this bridge collapsed.

Posted October 1, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Is this the bridge called the Honeytown Bridge? If so, here is the information from James Cooper's database:

Honeytown Bridge

Carries: Honeytown Rd./C.R. #39 Over: White River, E. Fork

County: Jackson(36), Bridge #: 83

Structure Length 325 feet. Clear Span: 159 feet. Structure Width 17 feet. Road Width (ft/in) 16/4

Panels: 11, Spans: 2

Built: 1882

Replaced: 1983 By: CPC I-beam

Built by the Wrought Iron Bridge Company of Canton, Ohio. Cut-stone abutments, piers, and wingwalls. Twenty-two feet and five inch truss depth, strengthened by a horizonal rod running through and attached to the interior verticals at mid-depth. The interior verticals consisted of I-beams reinforced with a plate riveted to each flange. Counter-braced in the three most central panels. U-bolted to the lower pins, eighteen-inch girder floor-beams carried runs of steel replacement stringers supporting a timber roadway.

Posted October 1, 2019, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Tony, guess on the builder?

Posted September 29, 2019, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Based on similar bridges (below), I would assume that this truss may have been built in the mid to late 1880s as a railroad bridge, before being moved for a pedestrian overpass south of campus; possibly as part of a double tracking project in the early 1900s.

http://bridgehunter.com/wi/washington/lammscapes-railroad/

http://bridgehunter.com/ia/boone/77840/

Posted September 29, 2019, by Barry (bllauver33 [at] gmail [dot] com )

Who owns abandoned railroad bridges over public rightofways, and what does it take to alter or remove one?