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Volk Ford Bridge

Photos 

Photo taken by Anthony Dillon in November 2009

Enlarge

BH Photo #148877

Map 

Street View 

Facts 

Overview
Three-span stone arch bridge over Salt Creek on CR 1000 East
Location
Decatur County, Indiana, and Franklin County, Indiana
Status
Open to traffic
History
Built 1895
Design
Stone arch
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 23.0 ft.
Total length: 85.0 ft.
Deck width: 15.7 ft.
Recognition
Eligible for the National Register of Historic Places
Also called
Salt Creek County Line Bridge
Decatur County Bridge #80
Franklin County Bridge #140
Approximate latitude, longitude
+39.32086, -85.29685   (decimal degrees)
39°19'15" N, 85°17'49" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
16/646814/4353766 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
New Point
Inventory numbers
INNBI 1600061 (Indiana bridge number on the National Bridge Inventory)
BH 16056 (Bridgehunter.com ID)
Inspection (as of 09/2015)
Superstructure condition rating: Satisfactory (6 out of 9)
Substructure condition rating: Satisfactory (6 out of 9)
Appraisal: Functionally obsolete
Sufficiency rating: 76.6 (out of 100)
Average daily traffic (as of 2013)
230

Update Log 

  • September 4, 2016: New Street View added by Dana and Kay Klein
  • October 3, 2015: New photo from Janis Ford
  • December 4, 2010: Updated by Anthony Dillon: Added historic name
  • November 8, 2009: New photos from Anthony Dillon

Sources 

Comments 

Volk Ford Bridge
Posted March 5, 2011, by Richard Tekulve (CANOEINDIANA [at] YAHOO [dot] COM)

The bridge is also known locally as ''County Line Bridge'' since it divides Franklin and Decatur counties.

Salt Creek Bridge
Posted December 2, 2010, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

As long as we are on the subject of odd stone arch retrofits, here is a weird one in Michigan: http://www.historicbridges.org/other/adrianrr/

Salt Creek Bridge
Posted December 2, 2010, by Anthony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Haven't noticed any Indiana stone arches with tie rods, but this bridge does have unusual rods running outside of the arches and fastened by pairs to metal channels. Not sure what benefit these provide however.