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US 24 (OLD) Cottonwood Creek bridge

Photos 

North side

Photo taken by James Norwood

Enlarge

BH Photo #161557

Map 

Street View 

Essay 

Written by James Norwood

Interesting location as Wabash River, TP&W Railroad, this old highway alignment, newer US 24 alignment, and long abandoned Wabash and Erie Canal all run beside each other here in this narrow confine that has a large hill immediately North of all. This site once had lumber mills in mid 1800's. Pennsylvania Railroad had a horrible train wreck near here that had passenger cars go into the adjacent river causing many deaths. Another catastrophe involved an Eastbound canal boat, or packet, named "Kentucky" was swept away into the river in June 1844 while the creek was swiftfully flowing damaging the canals crossing of this creek resulting in the death of 3. Cottonwood Creeks mouth is here where it goes into the Wabash River. Just East of here is Fitch's Glen, a local spot of historical significance that can be looked up via Google.

Facts 

Overview
Closed-spandrel arch bridge over Cottonwood Creek on former section of US 24 on different alignment
Location
Cass County, Indiana
Status
Closed to all traffic
Future prospects
Available for reuse
History
Bridge is on former alignment of US 24. Currently used by utility companies for access to poles.
Design
Closed-spandrel arch
Dimensions
Span length: 48.0 ft.
Total length: 48.0 ft.
Deck width: 20.0 ft.
Approximate latitude, longitude
+40.75655, -86.43200   (decimal degrees)
40°45'24" N, 86°25'55" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
16/547945/4511887 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Lucerne
Elevation
600 ft. above sea level
Inventory number
BH 44810 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Categories 

Arch (11,978)
Available for reuse (210)
Cass County, Indiana (91)
Closed (2,647)
Closed-spandrel arch (3,943)
Deck arch (11,218)
Have street view (26,553)
Indiana (4,880)
Owned privately (1,675)
Span length 25-50 feet (15,474)
Total length 25-50 feet (11,047)

Update Log 

  • March 31, 2014: New Street View added by Brent Tindall
  • April 8, 2010: Essay added by James Norwood

Sources