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White Creek Bridge #1

Photos 

Overview

The bridge is sitting in Mill Race Park seems to either be waiting restoration, or it is currently preserved in place.

Photo taken by James McCray in Feburary 2009

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BH Photo #132870

Map 

Facts 

Overview
Lost Pratt through truss bridge in Mill Race Park in Columbus
Location
Columbus, Bartholomew County, Indiana
Status
Was told that bridge had been "recycled"
History
Originally located on CR 600S over White Creek; later moved to Mill Race Park
Design
Pinned,Pratt through truss.
Also called
Mill Race Park Bridge
County Bridge #198 (at original location)
Approximate latitude, longitude
+39.20726, -85.92679   (decimal degrees)
39°12'26" N, 85°55'36" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
16/592660/4340325 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Columbus
Inventory number
BH 39070 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Categories 

Bartholomew County, Indiana (62)
Built during 1900s (6,463)
Columbus, Indiana (21)
Indiana (4,253)
Lost (19,746)
Lost 2010 (401)
Lost during 2010s (2,252)
Pratt through truss (4,705)
Pratt truss (8,180)
Through truss (13,181)
Truss (29,881)

Update Log 

  • April 15, 2010: Updated by Anthony Dillon: Bridge has been removed
  • March 6, 2010: Updated by Anthony Dillon: Added history
  • March 31, 2009: Updated by Anthony Dillon
  • March 29, 2009: Updated by Anthony Dillon
  • February 2, 2009: Added by James McCray

Sources 

  • James McCray - jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com
  • Tony Dillon - spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com

Comments 

White Creek Bridge #1
Posted April 16, 2010, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Agreed - aside from this "recycling" event, Indiana actually seems to be one of the best states for historic bridge preservation.

White Creek Bridge #1
Posted April 16, 2010, by Anthony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I'm not sure what they had in mind back when they moved the bridge to Mill Race Park. One person told me they didn't think the city even owned the bridge, and that another entity was involved. Knowing Columbus' penchant for architecture, I just assumed it was placed there as a sculpture of sorts. I prefer to see bridges reused on trails or roadways, but at least it was safe.......OR SO I THOUGHT!

I'm just disappointed when I think about all the wonderful restorations that have happened in Indiana over the past few years. I feel certain that there are several communities with trail projects in the works that would have loved to have this nice little span.

I don't know any other way to understand this, other than it being classified as an enormous brain fart...........

White Creek Bridge #1
Posted April 16, 2010, by James McCray (jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com)

The loss of this bridge is really sad to me. Last year I was on my way to Indy. from Louisville, KY to take my wife to the airport and we decided to stop in Columbus to take pictures of the bridges there. I, in particular, wanted to stop in Mill Race park to take pictures of the covered bridge to add to my "bridge hunting" collection. When we got to Columbus, we took pictures of the suspension bridges and then went to the park to take pictures of the covered bridge. Then while we were there, to my surprise, my wife found a bridge all on her own!! That's the truss bridge that is now gone. Yoy would think that they would have more foresight if they went through the trouble to get the bridge from its original location and place it in the park for people to enjoy only to have it taken out. Wow.......hmmm......maybe they should now go ahead and take out the covered bridge and replace it with a gift shop that sells replicas of the covered bridge that was once there!

White Creek Bridge #1
Posted April 16, 2010, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I would like to nominate Columbus (OH or IN) for the inaugural Pennsylvania-esque Bridge Blastin' Trophy (PBBT).

The PBBT - the most prestigious of dubious awards. Given only to those entities that truly set the standard for historic bridge "recycling"

In all seriousness though, building some sort of attraction to replace a bridge is not unique to this particular example. The Amelia Earhart Bridge in Atchison, KS/Winthrop, MO will be memorialized with a display of some sort. http://www.bridgehunter.com/ks/atchison/amelia-earhart/ This was considered to be "mitigation".

White Creek Bridge #1
Posted April 15, 2010, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

So they are demolishing a cultural resource to make room for a "cultural center." Sounds like something Pennsylvania would do. Apparently, despite all the historic bridge preservation in Indiana, there is still a population of ignorant agencies who show a complete lack of common sense.

I did some brief research on the city. Columbus, Indiana is appropriately named, since it has much in common with Columbus, Ohio, in particular their knack for complete ignorance of historic bridges and a strange fetish for bizarre modern bridges that may seem eye catching at first (until you realize how often these European style modern bridges are being built in the USA) but which have no heritage value whatsoever.

The Columbus Indiana website has its two modern bridges listed among "10 things to see in Columbus before you die": http://columbus.in.us//static/index.cfm?contentID=723

Actually, I would rather die than be forced to look upon these modern abominations.

White Creek Bridge #1
Posted April 15, 2010, by Anthony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Basically, they just needed the space to put in a new cultural center of some type and the bridge was a casualty of ignorance.

White Creek Bridge #1
Posted April 15, 2010, by J.P.

were is the logic in this, i really don't understand, i was going to ask James to take me up to see this bridge one day. And the fact that it is gone is disappointing.

White Creek Bridge #1
Posted April 15, 2010, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Anthony: I am sorry, I am having a little difficulty understanding what you posted here. It sounded like you said that the bridge pictured above, which is shown sitting on concrete footings in an exhibit format (essentially a preserved state) was demolished for scrap metal because Columbus didn't have some sort of preservation funds. This does not make sense, because the bridge is in a preserved state and does not require any funds, and further, with the bridge being in a state of preservation as a non-functional exhibit, such a structure should never be demolished for any reason, especially since no live loading is on the bridge, and there is no river to obstruct the bridge if it collapsed under its own weight.

Such a scenario as outlined above would constitute one of the most stupid singular things I have ever observed on the face of this planet.

White Creek Bridge #1
Posted April 15, 2010, by Anthony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I was in Columbus recently and noticed construction going on in the location where the bridge had been sitting for several years. I contacted the Columbus Parks Department hoping for good news that the bridge was to be used in another location. Unfortunately, I was told that they had no place or funds for the little bridge and that it had been "recycled".

It saddens me that a town that prides itself on architecture can just throw away a century old landmark with as much architectural character as any building in town. Whats even worse is that they have ample money to develop a new Mill Race Center Complex, but not the small amount needed to simply move the bridge to another location. At worse it should have been dismantled and stored for future use instead of sentencing it to the dumpster.

A town that I have admired since I was a kid has now become less interesting.

Mill Race Park Truss Bridge
Posted March 29, 2009, by Anthony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

James

This bridge was originally over White Creek in the southern part of the county. When they were replacing it, they decided it would make a nice piece of art in the park. Maybe someday they will find it better served on a trail.