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Red Bridge

Photos 

HAARGIS photo

Enlarge

BH Photo #165554

Map 

Facts 

Overview
Lost Through truss bridge over Vermilion River on Backbone Road
Location
Vermilion County, Illinois
Status
Replaced by new bridge
History
Built 1884, replaced in 1975
Builder
- P.E. Lane of Chicago, Illinois
Design
Pin-connected, 12-panel Whipple through truss
Also called
Backbone Road Bridge
Approximate latitude, longitude
+40.08491, -87.59381   (decimal degrees)
40°05'06" N, 87°35'38" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
16/449375/4437350 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Danville SE
Inventory number
BH 45262 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • December 1, 2010: New photos from Mike Roegner
  • November 25, 2010: Updated by Robert Stephenson: Changed name to historical name
  • May 16, 2010: Added by Robert Stephenson

Sources 

Comments 

Red Bridge
Posted September 27, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nathan:

That was my theory as well. Too bad most of the bridges in the catalog are long gone.

Red Bridge
Posted September 27, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The pony in that catalog is pin-connected however. Perhaps they replaced an original pin-connected pony truss of this design "in-kind" sort-of, albeit with riveted connections.

Red Bridge
Posted September 27, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Apparently, P.E. Lane did use pony trusses with truncated top chords as seen on this bridge.

This brochure shows a P.E. Lane Bridge over the Neosho River in Chanute, Kansas that features such pony spans:

http://historicbridges.org/indiana/darden/pelane.pdf

Source: Nathan Holth http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=in...

Red Bridge
Posted July 25, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

While riveted connections were used as early as 1883 (1883 spans of the Rocks Village Bridge in MA) most examples were like that bridge found in the eastern USA. And I doubt any were continuous from that period. Not only is this pony likely an alteration, the extension of the top chord to meet the end post was likely a decorative detail. Structurally, the continuous pony has vertical end posts.

Red Bridge
Posted July 25, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

That is very possible. The USA has had some creative county engineers, so this might be another option. I have not seen anything exactly like this either.

Red Bridge
Posted July 24, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I'm almost thinking that this pony wasn't built like this...

That it might have just been moved here and modified into the structure. Either way, it's actually very interesting!

Red Bridge
Posted July 24, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

That makes sense. I was on a mobile device and did not inspect it as close as I should have.

Red Bridge
Posted July 24, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Well, I'm 99.5% sure that this pony was an addition. Don't think they knew what a riveted Warren even was back then. Just bizarre to think that it was basically molded into the through truss, and even the support underneath is atypical.

Red Bridge
Posted July 24, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Leave it to P.E. Lane to think outside the box.

Red Bridge
Posted July 24, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This was a beauty with very unique portal bracing.

Also the way that the Warren pony truss was incorporated directly into the through truss is something I haven't seen before.